Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to use protobuff in a Java application to facilitate serialization and I have a question about this quote from the Google web site

Protocol Buffers and O-O Design Protocol buffer classes are basically dumb data holders (like structs in C++); they don't make good first class citizens in an object model. If you want to add richer behaviour to a generated class, the best way to do this is to wrap the generated protocol buffer class in an application-specific class. Wrapping protocol buffers is also a good idea if you don't have control over the design of the .proto file (if, say, you're reusing one from another project). In that case, you can use the wrapper class to craft an interface better suited to the unique environment of your application: hiding some data and methods, exposing convenience functions, etc. You should never add behaviour to the generated classes by inheriting from them. This will break internal mechanisms and is not good object-oriented practice anyway.

from: http://code.google.com/apis/protocolbuffers/docs/javatutorial.html

What does it mean when it says to wrap the created class?

share|improve this question
    
look at design pattern wrapper, aka adapter en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adapter_pattern –  none Nov 1 '10 at 15:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Perspective 1

You write a .proto file and give it to protoc that generates the Builder code. They are suggesting not to add any methods to the generated code. If at all you want some custom behavior to be added to the generated code then WRITE YOUR OWN CLASS WRAPPING the generated code.

For e.g let us say the protoc generated class is MyMessageBuilder. And you wanted to add a method that can take XML input and spitout the protobuff specific message out. You would write a XmlToMyMessageBuilder as below. Here XmlToMyMessageBuilder, your class is wrapping the generated code and adding custom behavior fromXml().

public class XmlToMyMessageBuilder
{
private final MyMessageBuilder protoBuilder;

public MyMessage fromXml(byte[] input()
{
protoBuilder.setXXX();
}
}

This is a general good programming principle.

Perspective 2

By providing a intermediary you can also DECOUPLE your code from the underlying serialization mechanism. This allows you to switch the serializer implementations (say you want to serialize a payload where all the data is in string format...where JSON seriazation with compression is a better alternative) with low impact. You could do something like this

public interface MySerializer
{
boolean serialize(MyDomainObject input);
}

public PBBasedSerializer implements MySerializer
{
private final MyMessageBuilder protoBuilder;
...
}

public JsonBasedSerializer implements MySerializer
{
private final JSONSerializer jsonSerializer;
...
}
share|improve this answer

It means that you would implement your own class that contains a protocol buffer object as a private field.

Protocol buffer classes are generated from .proto files. These generated classes have all methods to directly manipulate the fields they contain. But they don't have methods that serve higher level operations than just modifying a field.

Your wrapper class can then provide a richer or more restricted interface to users of your API. As any modification of the protocol buffer needs to go through the wrapping object, you have full control about what operations you want to support.

share|improve this answer
    
Well the generated messages are immutable so we can't change the fields, can we? –  Kostia Dombrovsky Mar 30 '11 at 14:37
    
It you want to modify contents, use the builders instead. –  MForster Mar 30 '11 at 15:20

What does it mean when it says to wrap the created class?

They're handing you a class, wrap it with a child class purpose built for what you're doing. Don't interact with a raw class instance from the library.

share|improve this answer
4  
Stop with the "Master Wu" garbage answers that aren't answers. I'm tired of seeing them flagged. –  Bill the Lizard Nov 1 '10 at 19:08
    
@Bill: I object. The Master Wu answers were all actually rather insightful and topical. (as well as entertaining) They approached treating programming as a Zen Art (as it should be), rather than "wahts teh codez?" that frequently happens on SO. –  abelenky Nov 1 '10 at 20:41
2  
@abelenky: A lot of people disagree. None of the answers that I deleted actually answered a question. We have a higher standard than just "entertaining" here on SO. If it had just been one or two answers it probably would have flown, but this really isn't the place for a novelty account that serves no purpose. –  Bill the Lizard Nov 1 '10 at 20:51
2  
@abelenky: Also, please feel free to flag "wahts teh codez?" style questions for deletion as well. –  Bill the Lizard Nov 1 '10 at 20:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.