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I have two tables in SQL and I need to be able to do a join based off of the timestamp in table B that is earlier than or equal to the timestamp in table A.

So, here is some fake data for two tables and the desired output:

Closed Cases (Table A)

| id | resolution |         timestamp          |
------------------------------------------------
|  1 |     solved | 2006-10-05 11:55:44.888153 |
|  2 |     closed | 2007-10-07 12:34:17.033498 |
|  3 |    trashed | 2008-10-09 08:19:36.983747 |
|  4 |     solved | 2010-10-13 04:28:14.348753 |

Classification (Table B)


| id |    value    |         timestamp          |
-------------------------------------------------
|  1 |    freshman | 2006-01-01 12:02:44.888153 |
|  2 |   sophomore | 2007-01-01 12:01:19.984333 |
|  3 |      junior | 2008-01-01 12:02:28.746149 |

Desired Results

| id | resolution |         timestamp          |    value    |
--------------------------------------------------------------
|  1 |     solved | 2006-10-05 11:55:44.888153 |    freshman |
|  2 |     closed | 2007-10-07 12:34:17.033498 |   sophomore |
|  3 |    trashed | 2008-10-09 08:19:36.983747 |      junior |
|  4 |     solved | 2010-10-13 04:28:14.348753 |      junior |

So, I know the code needs to look like the following, I just can't figure out what to do with the ON portion of the JOIN ($1 and $2 are variables that will be passed in):

SELECT case.id, case.resolution, case.timestamp, class.value
  FROM closed_cases AS case
  LEFT JOIN classifications AS class ON ???
  WHERE case.timestamp BETWEEN $1 AND $2;

I know I could use a sub-select, but this will be operating on at least a few thousand rows, probably more, and I need it to be really fast; so I was hoping for a simple clause that could do it.

share|improve this question
    
I think you'll need your sub-select. Have you tested the performance and found it unacceptable? –  Beth Nov 1 '10 at 16:08
    
if the version of SQL you're using supports windowing analytical functions you should be able to do it without a sub-select, but some versions of SQL don't support them. For a single sub-select on a few thousand rows, performance shouldn't be too bad. (The sub-select will be on the classification table - will this really have more than a few thousand rows?) –  Mark Bannister Nov 1 '10 at 16:19
    
@Mark - Actually, come to think of it, the classification table should have way less rows than that as I'll be checking to see if the data has actually changed from the most current version. So I guess the sub-select would have worked just fine, but I think adding the end time is a far cleaner solution. –  Topher Fangio Nov 1 '10 at 16:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you can make changes to the table structures, I recommend changing the classification table to include an end date as well as a start date - it will be much easier to join to the table that way.

If not, I suggest the following:

SELECT case.id, case.resolution, case.timestamp, class.value
  FROM closed_cases AS case
  LEFT JOIN (select c.*, 
                    (select min(timestamp)
                     from classifications c1
                      where c1.timestamp > c.timestamp) timeend
             from classifications c) AS class 
  ON case.timestamp >= class.timestamp and 
     (case.timestamp < class.timeend or class.timeend IS NULL)
  WHERE case.timestamp BETWEEN $1 AND $2;

EDIT - with the end date on classification:

SELECT case.id, case.resolution, case.timestamp, class.value
  FROM closed_cases AS case
  LEFT JOIN classifications AS class 
  ON case.timestamp >= class.timestamp and case.timestamp < class.timeend
  WHERE case.timestamp BETWEEN $1 AND $2;
share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain briefly how changing the table structure to include the end date would help? I could theoretically do this by always setting the current end date to be some time really far in the future and updating the previous entry's end date to be the current entries start date. –  Topher Fangio Nov 1 '10 at 16:16
    
@Topher - additional query added; no sub-select is required, and the query should be sargable. –  Mark Bannister Nov 1 '10 at 16:23
    
+1/Accepted - Thanks for the help Mark! I'll just add the end time to make life easier. –  Topher Fangio Nov 1 '10 at 16:32

change the time stamp and use an int as a key to connect the tables. this will work much faster then comparing date

table 1 field1 field2 field3 ConnectorField

table2 field1 field2 field3 ConnectorField

and all you need to do is select * from table1 T1 inner join table2 T2 on T1.ConnectorField = T2.ConnectorField

share|improve this answer
    
This solution requires that the OP can change the structure of the existing database, and will prevent changes to the date ranges of classifications against existing cases. –  Mark Bannister Nov 1 '10 at 16:01
    
It doesn't matter whether or not I use an integer (aren't timestamps stored as integers anyway), this still doesn't solve the problem of "closest to". I would still need to do the join based off of exactly one integer in table B that is less than or equal to the integer in table A. –  Topher Fangio Nov 1 '10 at 16:03
    
@Topher, probably i didn't understand the specification. –  none Nov 2 '10 at 11:08
SELECT case.id, case.resolution, case.timestamp, class.value
  FROM closed_cases AS case
  LEFT JOIN classifications AS class 
  ON case.timestamp >= class.timestamp
  WHERE case.timestamp BETWEEN $1 AND $2;
share|improve this answer
    
This will return all classifications after the case timestamp for each case, instead of just the applicable classification - so for the example provided, you would see 11 rows returned instead of the 4 required. –  Mark Bannister Nov 1 '10 at 15:59
    
@Mark Mannister - Exactly. I need only the 4 rows (I'm going to do a count and group them later). –  Topher Fangio Nov 1 '10 at 16:02

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