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This is a sneaky general question masquerading under the guise of a very specific problem. To cover my shame the specific switch statement I'm wondering if there's a better alternative to is:

switch(somestring)
{
    case "Left":
         //a series of distinct instructions on a 'left' command
         //specifically subtract one from an index and overwrite the data
         //at that index with the data at the current index but
         //only if the current index is even.
         break;
    case "Right":
         //a series of distinct instructions on a 'right' command
         //specifically add one to an index and overwrite the data
         //at that index with the data at the current index but
         //only if the current index is odd.
         break;
    case "Up":
         //a series of distinct instructions on an 'up' command
         //specifically subtract two from an index and overwrite the data
         //at that index with the data at the current index but
         //only if the current index is greater than two.
         break;
    case "Down":
         //a series of distinct instructions on a 'down' command
         //specifically add two to an index and overwrite the data
         //at that index with the data at the current index but
         //only if the current index is less than seven.
         break;
}

As you can see there are many subtle differences in the code which make each operation distinctive enough that I can't see a way to collapse all the operations into a single operation without making it nasty and complex.

And now onto the sneaky generalised part of the question. I received some advice that switch statements in C# were a code smell and should always be refactored. In some cases I heartily agree that there are better ways of doing things, dictionaries, polymorphism etc. Sometimes, though I feel a switch is useful and appropriate. I think this is one of those times.

Am I wrong? If so why, and in the specific case mentioned what should I do about it? Feel free to go into how I am wrong in a deeper and more general sense.

Of course, if I am right, that is good too...

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switch doesn't work (IIRC) on strings. –  KevinDTimm Nov 1 '10 at 16:21
9  
someone should tell the switch statements I have that use strings ;) –  One Monkey Nov 1 '10 at 16:25
    
@KevinDTimm: wrong language. You're thinking Pascal/Delphi. –  Chris Lively Nov 1 '10 at 16:28
    
Too bad we can't downvote comments. –  Joel Etherton Nov 1 '10 at 16:29
    
@Joel - why do you think I posted it as a comment :( BTW, I hated the thought of posting that comment so I looked it up on the MS site and found all their examples were int only. Mea Culpa (but shame on MS too!) –  KevinDTimm Nov 1 '10 at 16:32

5 Answers 5

up vote 17 down vote accepted

I received some advice that switch statements in C# were a code smell and should always be refactored.

I disagree with this statement. Personally, I feel that every language feature does have its valid usage scenarios.

Switch statements often deserve to be looked into - they can easily become a portion of your code with a code smell, especially since it's often easy to introduce repeated code, or difficult to maintain code within a switch.

However, there are perfectly valid use cases for switch statements.

That being said, I would still look for refactoring opportunities. In this case, it sounds like the "body" of each switch block could be refactored into a single method, which took two parameters: an offset plus a predicate. Your switch statement could then be a single line of code plus a break per option, which would dramatically simplify the code. This would require a method like:

void UpdateIndex(int currentIndex, int offset, Func<int, bool> condition)
{
    if (condition(currentIndex))
    {
        data[currentIndex + offset] = data[currentIndex];
    }
}

Your switch statement would then simplify to:

switch(something)
{
    case "Left": // I would also consider using an enum if appropriate instead of magic strings here...
        UpdateIndex(currentIndex, -1, i => i % 2 == 0);
        break;
    case "Right":
        UpdateIndex(currentIndex, 1, i => i % 2 == 1);
        break;
    case "Up":
        UpdateIndex(currentIndex, -2, i => i > 2);
        break;
    case "Down":
        UpdateIndex(currentIndex, 2, i => i < 7);
        break;
    default:
        throw new YourExceptionHere(...);
}

The above code doesn't "smell" to me - it's fairly easy to understand, as each condition is short and testable, and there is no duplicated code.

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Strikes me that defining the enum would allow you to just call UpdateIndex(currentIndex, somethingEnum, condition) and lose the switch altogether. However I also think the original switch is pretty clear. The RWTF here is the string constants, not the switch. –  annakata Nov 1 '10 at 16:36
    
@annakata: Yeah - though, in the original switch, you've got a fair amount of duplicated code. The enum could push this into the method, but at some point, you'll need a switch. The enum could handle the offset, but not the conditions... I agree the switch on string is probably worse than the switch, which was why I added that comment. –  Reed Copsey Nov 1 '10 at 16:39
    
Really thorough and useful, thanks! –  One Monkey Nov 1 '10 at 16:43

Have you considered using a Dictionary<string, Action> ? I have found this a good way to elimate switches in my code.

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Wow. I have never even seen the Action delegate thing before and while googling that I found out about anonymous methods which I've also never had call to use. Interesting commentary! –  One Monkey Nov 1 '10 at 16:31
3  
+1 - I like the dictionary approach, but it's also potentially more complicated than the switch. If there are potentially many options, however, I think it's a nicer alternative. If the options are few and fixed, I personally prefer a switch. –  Reed Copsey Nov 1 '10 at 16:41

There are many ways to refactor this, but I wouldn't say that the switch statement is code smell in and of itself.

One refactoring example is to break each command into a class. Have the switch statement be a factory that produces the correct object to run the operation... You could even bring in the plugin framework in case you decide that you might need to add things like "go backwards!" or to provide alternate handling of what "left" is.

But that may just add a whole lot of "enterprisey" code for exactly zero benefit and a worse smell. ;)

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The classic "law of diminishing returns" problem... worth considering. –  One Monkey Nov 1 '10 at 16:42
2  
+1 for the last sentence. Often, "simple" is better than "clever." –  Wonko the Sane Nov 1 '10 at 17:16

I don't think switch statements are always a code smell.

If the statements you are putting into the cases are small and restricted to a specific set of tests (which they are in this case), you should be fine.

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Consider refactoring to a design pattern such as Command. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Command_pattern#C.23

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Interesting. I certainly shall consider it. –  One Monkey Nov 1 '10 at 16:41
    
Agree with statements about switch statements and code smells. From wikipedia - "In computer programming, code smell is any symptom in the source code of a program that possibly indicates a deeper problem". –  john Nov 1 '10 at 17:36

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