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I'm facing a hard problem:

Imagine I have a map of an entire country, represented by a huge matrix of Cells. Each cell represents a 1 square meter of territory. Each Cell is represented as a double value between 0 and 1 that represents the cost of traversing the cell.

The map obviously is not fittable in memory.

I am trying to wrap my mind arround a way to calculate the optimal path for a robot, from a start point to a end position. The first idea I had was to make a TCP-like moving window, with a minimap of the real map arround the moving robot, and executing the A* algorithm inside there, but I'm facing some problems with maps with huge walls, bad pathfinding, etc...

I am searching the literature about A*-like algorithms and I could not visualize an approximation of what would be a good solution for this problem.

I'm wondering if someone has faced a similar problem or can help with a idea of a possible solution!

Thanks in advance :)

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3 Answers

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Since I do not know exact data, here's some information that could be useful:

  • A partial path of a shortest path is itself a shortest path. I.e. you might split up your matrix into submatrices and find (all) shortest paths in there. Note that you do not have to store all results: You e.g. can save memory by not saving a complete path but just the information: Path goes from A to B. The intermediate nodes might be computed later again or stored in a file for later. You might even be able to precompute some shortest paths for certain areas.

  • Another approach is that you might be able to compress your matrix in some way. I.e. if you have large areas consisting only of one and the same number, it might be good to store just that number and the dimensions of that area.

  • Another approach (in connection to precompute some shortest paths) is to generate different levels of detail of your map. Considering a map of the USA, this might look the following: The coarsest level of detail contains just the cities New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas, Philadelphia, Houston und Phoenix. The finer the levels get, the more cities they contain, but - on the other hand - the smaller area of your whole map is shown by them.

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Having different levels of detail would be a nice idea. If I understood correctly, a 9x9 matrix could be divided in a 3x3 matrix where each cell itself its a 3x3 matrix, and its value is determined by an heuristic function. As with A*, the heuristic function should not overestimate the cost, or it won't find the optimal path. What puzzles me is how should I position the start and end points when I calculate the path inside every submatrix? –  CatOsMandros Nov 1 '10 at 17:16
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Does your problem have any special structure, e.g., does the triangle inequality hold/can you guarantee that the shortest path doesn't jog back and forth? Do you want to perform the query many times? (If so you can do pre-processing that will amortize over multiple queries.) Do you need the exact minimum solution, or will something within an epsilon factor be OK?

One thought was that you can coarsen the matrix - form 100 meter by 100 meter squares, and determine the shortest path distances through the 100 \times 100 squares. Now this will fit in memory (about 1 Gigabyte), you can run Dijkstra, and then expand each step through the 100 \times 100 square.

Also, have you tried running a forward-backward version of Dijkstra's algorithm? I.e., expand from the source and search forthe sink at the same time, and stop when there's an intersection.

Incidentally, why do you need such a fine level of granularity?

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The problem has not any special structure, its just the special case of a matrix with a weight on every node. The query should only be performed once, and the exact solution would be nice but it should be computationally reasonable, so a good-enough solution is OK. The idea is the same that phimuemue expressed, but a low-memory algorithm should be used. The problem is wich one? –  CatOsMandros Nov 1 '10 at 21:32
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Here are some ideas that may work

You can model your path as a piecewise linear curve. If you have 31 line segments then your curve is fully described by 60 numbers. Each of the possible curves have a cost, so the cost is a function on the following form

cost(x1, x2, x3 ..... x60)

Now your problem is to find the global optimum of a function of 60 variables. You can use standard methods to do this. One idea is to use genetic algorithms. Another idea is to use a monte carlo method such as parallel tempering

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parallel_tempering

Whenever you have a promising path then you can use it as a starting point to find a local minimum of the cost function. Maybe you can use some interpolation to make your cost function is differentiable. Then you can use Newtons method (or rather BFGS) to find local mimima of the cost function.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Local_minimum

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BFGS

Your problem is somewhat similar to the problem of finding reaction paths in chemical systems. Maybe you can find some inspiration in the book "Energy Landscapes" by Davis Wales.

But I also have some questions:

  • Is it necessary for you to find the optimal path, or are you just looking for an path that is OK?
  • How much computer power and time do you have at hand?
  • Can the robot make sharp turns, or do you need extra physics modelling to improve the cost function?
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> Is it necessary for you to find the optimal path, or are you just looking for an path that is OK? the exact solution would be nice but it should be computationally reasonable, so a good-enough solution is OK –  CatOsMandros Nov 7 '10 at 9:51
    
How much computer power and time do you have at hand? Kinda limited, but time is not a constraint, so it doesnt matter... –  CatOsMandros Nov 7 '10 at 9:52
    
Can the robot make sharp turns, or do you need extra physics modelling to improve the cost function? I don't have to care about that:) . –  CatOsMandros Nov 7 '10 at 9:54
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