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I try to learn jQuery. I watch a Lynda training video in which there is the following code

$("document").ready(function() {
        $("form :checked").css("border", "3px solid red");
    });

The above code works correctly on ie and opera but it doesn't work on firefox and webkit (chrome,safari).

The version of the jquery is 1.3.2 .What is the problem with above? How can I achieve cross browser compatibility with form selectors?

Edit: The html code is the following

 <h1>
        Example Form Document</h1>
<form action="" method="post">

<table class="style1">
<tbody>
    <tr>
        <td class="style2">
            First Name</td>
        <td>
            <input id="FirstName" type="text" /></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td class="style2">
            Last Name</td>
        <td>
            <input id="LastName" type="text" /></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td class="style2">
            Disabled Element</td>
        <td>
            <input id="Text1" type="text" disabled="disabled"/></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td class="style2">
            Gender</td>
        <td>
            <input id="Male" type="radio" checked="checked"/>M<input id="Female" type="radio" />F</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td class="style2">
            What products are you interested in?</td>
        <td>
            <input id="Checkbox1" type="checkbox" checked="checked"/><label for="Checkbox1">Widgets</label><br />
            <input id="Checkbox2" type="checkbox" /><label for="Checkbox1">Hibbity Jibbities</label><br />
            <input id="Checkbox3" type="checkbox" checked="checked"/><label for="Checkbox1">SplashBangers</label><br />
            <input id="Checkbox4" type="checkbox" /><label for="Checkbox1">Whatzits</label></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td class="style2">
            Comments:</td>
        <td>
            <textarea id="Comments" cols="40" name="S1" rows="5"></textarea></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td class="style2">
            Optional life story file</td>
        <td>
            <input id="File1" type="file" /></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td class="style2">&nbsp;
            </td>
        <td>&nbsp;
            </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td class="style2">&nbsp;
            </td>
        <td>
            <input id="Submit1" type="submit" value="submit" /> <input id="Reset1" 
                type="reset" value="reset" /></td>
    </tr>
</tbody></table>

</form>
share|improve this question
1  
Can you show the HTML as well? –  Pekka 웃 Nov 1 '10 at 16:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Other browsers don't let you style the border of checkboxes...

The logic is correct, just not applying the styles in Firefox/Webkit.

http://jsfiddle.net/vVN6x/

Note that the margins work in the sample, but not the borders (unless you are in IE)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @scunliffe. It would be interesting to learn why Gecko and Webkit developers don't support some styling on checkboxes. –  Sotiris Nov 1 '10 at 16:40
2  
@Sotiris, it's because Gecko and Webkit call operating-system level library functions to render form elements, and these library functions generally only accept a limited set of parameters compared to what css would allow. Since the browser doesn't directly handle these renderings, it also doesn't have much control over them. –  Ben Lee Nov 1 '10 at 16:50
    
@Ben Lee really great answer. Thank you for this additional info –  Sotiris Nov 1 '10 at 17:00

The standard way to do this cross-browser is to fake it. Create an image sprite that contains all your custom-looking inputs (for your example, that would be two squares -- one with a 1-pixel solid black border and one with a 3-pixel solid red border). Then write a javascript snippet that goes through the DOM once it's loading, hiding all inputs and replacing them with styled spans. The styled spans will show the correct image sprite. Then attach even handlers to each of these spans so that clicking on them changes the state of the underlying hidden inputs (and also changes the class name of the span to show a different sprite associated with its new state).

For a detailed explanation and code samples, see here: http://ryanfait.com/resources/custom-checkboxes-and-radio-buttons/

And someone wrote a jQuery-compatible library to facilitate this: http://customformelements.net/features.php

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks AND for this answer. Great logic behind the implementation and simple. I really like it and I will use it for sure in the near future. Thanks again –  Sotiris Nov 1 '10 at 17:02

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