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My code right now has O(N) insertion time, and O(1) removal time. I need to change this around. I am trying to implement O(1) insertion time and O(N) deletion time.

Legend:

nItems = number of items/objects. Initially is set 0.

queArray is my array of long integers.

Here are my two methods. Insertion method does all the sorting work. Delete method just one line - to delete the first element in the array which happens to be the smallest number thanks to our Insert method.

If I were to change insertion time to O(1) would I need to give "sorting task" to remove method? It's a priority queue after all and we have to sort it, otherwise it would be just a regular queue with numbers in random order.

Please, any help would be nice!!!

public void insert(long item) {
    int j;
    if(nItems==0) // if no items,
        queArray[nItems++] = item; // insert at 0
    else {
        for(j=nItems-1; j>=0; j--) { // start at the end
            if( item > queArray[j] ) // if new item larger,
                queArray[j+1] = queArray[j]; // shift upward
            else // if smaller,
                break; // done shifting
        } // end for

        queArray[j+1] = item; // insert it
        nItems++;
    } // end else (nItems > 0)
} 

public long remove() // remove minimum item
{ return queArray[--nItems]; }
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you want O(1) insertion time and O(N) removal time, simply add new elements unsorted to the end of your internal array, and do an O(N) linear search through your list for removals, shifting the rest of the array down one.

Or for a better implementation, you may want to consider a Fibonacci heap.

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I'm not certain you can achieve O(1) insertion time for an array-based priority queue. You could get O(log n) by using a min/max heap structure.

Here's an implementation of that using a List<> internally (but that could be swapped to an array implementation easily enough.

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace HeapADT
{
    public class Heap<T> : ICollection, IEnumerable<T>
        where T : IComparable<T>
    {
        #region Private Members
        private readonly List<T> m_Items;
        private readonly IComparer<T> m_Comparer;
        #endregion

        #region Constructors
        public Heap()
            : this(0)
        {}

        public Heap( int capacity )
            : this( capacity, null )
        {}

        public Heap( IEnumerable<T> items )
            : this( items, null )
        {}

        public Heap( int capacity, IComparer<T> comparer )
        {
            m_Items = new List<T>(capacity);
            m_Comparer = comparer ?? Comparer<T>.Default;
        }

        public Heap( IEnumerable<T> items, IComparer<T> comparer )
        {
            m_Items = new List<T>(items);
            m_Comparer = comparer ?? Comparer<T>.Default;
            BuildHeap();
        }
        #endregion

        #region Operations
        public void Add( T item )
        {
            m_Items.Add( item );

            var itemIndex = Count - 1;

            while( itemIndex > 0 )
            {
                var parentIndex = ParentIndex(itemIndex);
                // are we a heap? If yes, then we're done...
                if( m_Comparer.Compare( this[parentIndex], this[itemIndex] ) < 0 )
                    return;
                // otherwise, sift the item up the heap by swapping with parent
                Swap( itemIndex, parentIndex );
                itemIndex = parentIndex;
            }
        }

        public T RemoveRoot()
        {
            if( Count == 0 )
                throw new InvalidOperationException("Cannot remove the root of an empty heap.");

            var rootItem = this[0];
            ReplaceRoot(RemoveLast());
            return rootItem;
        }

        public T RemoveLast()
        {
            if( Count == 0 )
                throw new InvalidOperationException("Cannot remove the tail from an empty heap.");

            var leafItem = this[Count - 1];
            m_Items.RemoveAt( Count-1 );
            return leafItem;
        }

        public void ReplaceRoot( T newRoot )
        {
            if (Count == 0)
                return; // cannot replace a nonexistent root

            m_Items[0] = newRoot;
            Heapify(0);
        }

        public T this[int index]
        {
            get { return m_Items[index]; }
            private set { m_Items[index] = value; }
        }
        #endregion

        #region Private Members
        private void Heapify( int parentIndex )
        {
            var leastIndex = parentIndex;
            var leftIndex  = LeftIndex(parentIndex);
            var rightIndex = RightIndex(parentIndex);

            // do we have a right child?
            if (rightIndex < Count) 
                leastIndex = m_Comparer.Compare(this[rightIndex], this[leastIndex]) < 0 ? rightIndex : leastIndex;
            // do we have a left child?
            if (leftIndex < Count) 
                leastIndex = m_Comparer.Compare(this[leftIndex], this[leastIndex]) < 0 ? leftIndex : leastIndex;

            if (leastIndex != parentIndex)
            {
                Swap(leastIndex, parentIndex);
                Heapify(leastIndex);
            }
        }

        private void Swap( int firstIndex, int secondIndex )
        {
            T tempItem = this[secondIndex];
            this[secondIndex] = this[firstIndex];
            this[firstIndex] = tempItem;
        }

        private void BuildHeap()
        {
            for( var index = Count/2; index >= 0; index-- )
                Heapify( index );
        }

        private static int ParentIndex( int childIndex )
        {
            return (childIndex - 1)/2;
        }

        private static int LeftIndex( int parentIndex )
        {
            return parentIndex*2 + 1;
        }

        private static int RightIndex(int parentIndex)
        {
            return parentIndex*2 + 2;
        }
        #endregion
        #region ICollection Members
        public void CopyTo(Array array, int index)
        {
            m_Items.CopyTo( (T[])array, index );
        }

        public int Count
        {
            get { return m_Items.Count; }
        }

        public bool IsSynchronized
        {
            get { return false; }
        }

        public object SyncRoot
        {
            get { return null; }
        }
        #endregion

        #region IEnumerable Members
        IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
        {
            return GetEnumerator();
        }

        public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
        {
            return m_Items.GetEnumerator();
        }
        #endregion
    }
}
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An unsorted linked list sounds like it fits the requirements stated (although they seem a bit silly for most practical applications). You have constant insertion time (stick it at the end or beginning), and linear deletion time (scan the list for the smallest element).

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There is no way to implement a O(1) insertion method and keep you array sorted. If you pass your sorting to the delete method the fast you can do is a O(N log(n)) with quick sort or something. Or you can do a O(log n) algorithm in the insert method like LBushkin suggest.

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