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From a web service (WCF), I want an endpoint to take 10 seconds to finish.

Is there a way I can do a thread.sleep(10); on the method?

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System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(10000); –  Arjan Einbu Jan 2 '09 at 15:37
    
Please clarify your question - why wouldn't you be able to just make your method sleep? –  Jon Skeet Jan 2 '09 at 15:38
    
I can't seem to find the Thread method, let me fully qualify it sorry! –  Blankman Jan 2 '09 at 15:38
    
Thread is not a method, it's a class in the System.Threading namespace, as shown by Arjan in the first comment. Sleep is a static method on the Thread class. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Jan 2 '09 at 15:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You could create a wrapper method which does the appropriate sleep.

Thread.Sleep(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10))
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seconds, not minutes –  Dmitri Nesteruk Jan 2 '09 at 16:58
    
@nesteruk, thanks. I updated the answer –  JaredPar Jan 2 '09 at 18:20
    
System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(10000) –  Michael Haren Jan 2 '09 at 18:26
    
Just note that this wills leep roughly 10seconds. The Sleep timer precision can be multiple thread slices ~50ms on slower machines. –  CodingBarfield Apr 15 '13 at 6:29

Start a new thread that sleeps for 10 sec, then return, that way the time that the methos takes to run won't add to the 10 seconds

using System.Threading;

public static WCF(object obj) 
    {
        Thread newThread = 
            new Thread(new ThreadStart(Work));
        newThread.Start();

        //do method here

        newThread.Join();
        return obj;

    }

    static void Work()
    {
        Thread.Sleep(10000);
    }
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If you mean without changing the code on the other (Server-side) end of the WCF call, (since if you can change the code there then the answer is obvious),

then no..

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If this is just for testing, you could have the proxy class point to a web proxy that simulates the timeout. Using Fiddler you could script the request/response to be delayed by 10 seconds and then have the proxy class use Fiddler to make web service requests by setting the "Proxy" property:

IWebProxy proxy = new WebProxy("http://localhost:8888", true);
webService.Proxy = proxy;
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