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Is there a way to correctly concatenate three arbitrary XPath expressions to result in a new valid XPath expression?

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@user488963: To answer this, XPath expression examples are needed. –  user357812 Nov 1 '10 at 18:02
    
.//a[@class='no-hover hint']/b/text() .//a[@class='no-hover hint-2']/b/text() .//a[@class='no-hover hint'-3]/b/text() there is three expressions –  user488963 Nov 1 '10 at 18:12
    
i am using java –  user488963 Nov 1 '10 at 18:17
    
Good question, +1. See my answer for many examples. –  Dimitre Novatchev Nov 1 '10 at 18:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Update: The OP has indicated in a comment that the three expressions select text nodes.

In this case using the union operator (|) seems most appropriate.


Is there a way to correctly concatenate three arbitrary XPath expressions to result in a new valid XPath expression?

There are many possible ways to do this and some of these may benefit from knowing the return type of the evaluation.

One of the combinator that always "works" (although maynot always be meaningful) is:

concat(Expr1, Expr2, Expr3)

Other examples:

number(Expr1) + number(Expr2) + number(Expr3)

boolean(Expr1) or boolean(Expr2) or boolean(Expr3)

In case the expressions are guaranteed to select a node-set, then this expression (the union of the node-sets) would also combine them:

Expr1 | Expr2 | Expr3

In XPath 2.0 this expression should always work (concatenation to a sequence of items):

Expr1 , Expr2 , Expr3

or this one:

  if(boolean(Expr1))
    then Expr2
    else Expr3
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+1 Very good answer. Also, expression are in question's comments. –  user357812 Nov 1 '10 at 18:42
    
@Alejandro: Thanks, added an update. –  Dimitre Novatchev Nov 1 '10 at 18:48

Sure. If they are disjoint, then you place them together separated with an "or" statement. If they are additive, then you can just do a (.net) Path.Combine() on them.

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