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I have a variable that is an object :

Foo x;

And I need to call a function that requires a Foo*. How can I convert from Foo to Foo*.

I know this wont work :

Foo* y = &x;
o->setFoo(y);

Because "x" is a local variable, so it will be destroyed and the pointer I gave will point to nothing.

How can I do ?

Note : I can't modify the function or the type of the variable a !

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1  
Arrrrr. Killing programs with pointers and no ownership. –  Loki Astari Nov 1 '10 at 18:39
1  
Will o take ownership of the memory pointed at? –  Bill Nov 1 '10 at 18:43
4  
Do yourself a favor NOW and read about RAII, shared_ptr, unique_ptr, scoped_ptr. Search SO for them. –  Steve Townsend Nov 1 '10 at 18:51

4 Answers 4

If the appropriate copy constructor is defined,

o->setFoo(new Foo(x));

But then o's destructor should delete x (and setFoo probably should too if it'.\s already set).

Note: defining a destructor is not enough.
The copy constructor/assignment operator also need to be defined and:

  • Should be disabled
  • or Understand what they point at and perform a deep copys
  • or understand shared ownership and track how many owners the pointer has.

See Rule of 4 for explanation.

If you can't touch the class definition of o at all, then you'll need to be very careful about the memory allocation/deallocation so you don't leak memory.

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1  
+1 for taking x into account. –  log0 Nov 1 '10 at 18:52
    
Nice to have the destructor delete it. BUT that advice alone is not correct and potentially dangerous. Add more info so I can delete mine. –  Loki Astari Nov 1 '10 at 19:27
    
@Martin What specifically would you like me to add? There's a lot of ground that could be covered... –  user470379 Nov 1 '10 at 19:37
    
Adding a destructor that deletes a pointer is going to cause a heck of a lot of problems unless you also define the other standard methods!! –  Loki Astari Nov 1 '10 at 19:42

You should allocate on the heap with the new keyword:

Foo* y = new Foo;
o->setFoo(y);

though you will need to manage the deletion of the Foo later on, otherwise you get memory leak.

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To give the most accurate answer to this, information about whether o is expected to manage the life cycle of the provided Foo, and if not the life cycle of o needs to be provided.

First, this could work fine, it depends on what o is going to do with the provided Foo.

I know this wont work :

Foo* y = &x;
o->setFoo(y);

Because "x" is a local variable, so it will be destroyed and the pointer I gave will point to nothing.

Ok, so lets say o is of type Bar

1 Bar manages Foo - ie. will delete the Foo.

Bar will be destroyed, in doing so it should do something so that Foo will be deleted Depending on what you need to do with Foo to configure it you could go for simple

{
 std::auto_ptr<Bar> o = new Bar();
 o->setFoo(new Foo());
 o->DoStuff();
}

or a bit more complex

{
 std::auto_ptr<Foo> y = new Foo(...);
 y->config();
 o->setFoo(y.release());
}

2 Bar doesn't manage Foo - ie. try and delete the Foo

If Bar doesn't manage the Foo then thats your job, but it is likely that Bar should be destroyed before Foo

2.1 lets assume Bar is only used in the current scope
Here Bar will be destroyed before Foo

{
 Foo y;
 std::auto_ptr<Bar> o = new Bar();
 o->setFoo(&y);
 o->DoStuff();
}

2.2 lets assume Bar is only used within an inner scope

SomeFunc( Foo *y );
{
 std::auto_ptr<Bar> o = new Bar();
 o->setFoo(y);
 o->DoStuff();
}

{
 Foo y;
 SomeFunc( &y );
}

2.3 lets assume you have Bar that will be used in different scopes

std::auto_ptr<Foo> y = new Foo();
std::auto_ptr<Bar> o = new Bar();

{
 o->setFoo(y.get());
}
{
 o->DoStuff();
}

and then further examples could be provided based on how you deal with Foo for multiple Bar, including containers etc.

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You can allocate the object of class Foo dynamically using new, e.g.

o->setFoo(new Foo);

Note that you have to take into account the ownership of this object, because if setFoo doesn't delete it you'll have a memory leak.

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