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I want to know how does the "Did you mean : ..." of Wikipedia works and if there's a way, like with the API, to use it? Because I want to get the corresponding page from my input but this one could include errors. Example . Is there a query that returns directly the suggestion?

Thank you for your help.

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An interesting fact is that sometimes same search query gets you different 'did you mean' if you are on different projects (even if they are of the same language) – BenMQ Jul 19 '13 at 5:20
    
Suggestions are based on probabilities given by other users who made the same spelling mistake. This forum gives a simple example of how a machine learning algorithm could calculate these probabilities. – Paul Rougieux Sep 1 '15 at 11:58
up vote 3 down vote accepted

(I am not sure of Wikipedia's implementation details, but this is one way to do it)
It probably uses a phonetic algorithm, such as Soundex and matches it against a precomputed database.
PHP offers some phonetic algorithms built in if you want to play with them.

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This comes under "information retrieval" in computer science. Lucene is the open source library implementing these concepts and could be the library you are looking for. For more details on information retrieval you can search Google. For specifics on how "Did you mean" can be implemented using Lucene, go through the below links

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You can use the Google API to get the appropriate Wikipedia article: http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/services/search/web?v=1.0&q=site:en.wikipedia.org%20Stanfrod%20univeristy

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