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I am using a simple regex to replace break tags with newlines:

br_regex = /<br>/;
input_content = input_content.replace(br_regex, "\n");

This only replaces the first instance of a break tag, but I need to replace all. preg_match_all() would do the trick in PHP, but I'd like to know the JavaScript equivalent.

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1  
As you don't need to match a regex pattern, you should be using str_replace() in PHP instead of preg_match_all() for your example: $str = str_replace('<br>', "\n", $str); –  scronide Jan 2 '09 at 19:30
    
You should really change title saying preg_replace and not preg_match_all, this is confusing and doesn't help when searching –  iBobo Jul 1 '10 at 17:15
    
Good point. Taken care of. –  chipotle_warrior Jul 8 '10 at 17:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 52 down vote accepted

Use the global flag, g:

foo.replace(/<br>/g,"\n")
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1  
you beat me by 1 second. –  Triptych Jan 2 '09 at 16:09
7  
float like a butterfly, sting like VB.. –  annakata Jan 2 '09 at 16:12
1  
@annakata what does that mean? –  Pineapple Under the Sea Sep 5 '12 at 15:51
5  
@XuqiciAcerto @JordanArseno The quote is Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee and as VB is pronounced as VeeBee, it closely resembles bee therefore being closer to the original quote. Also because this is a coding/programming Q&A website, and not an insect website, he uses VB (Visual Basic) instead of bee (flying honeymachine) –  GeenHenk Mar 14 '13 at 9:24
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Ahhhh... jokes are always better when explained, eh? –  Matt Fletcher May 19 at 12:03

JS idiom for non-Regexp global replace:

input_content.split('<br>').join('\n')
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I worker perfect for me. I do prefer this solutions than others. Easier to remember. Thank you –  Alex Moleiro Feb 28 at 14:26

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