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I have this tkinter GUI, and I need to get the values from the entries and compare. self.hystInt.get() is the way to access the string in the string variable in the Entry. *I have to write this for every variable so it ends up looking really ugly.

if (self.hystInt.get().isdigit() and int(self.hystInt.get()) >= 200 and int(self.hystInt.get()) <= 500):
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how many entries do you have? Table driven design might be more appropriate than repeating ugly code blocks. –  Nick Dandoulakis Nov 1 '10 at 21:06
2  
while the genesis of this code may have been a tkinter program, the question really has nothing to do with tkinter. I recommend removing the tkinter tag. The question and answer is equally valid for any objects that require a get() to retrieve the value. –  Bryan Oakley Nov 1 '10 at 21:17
    
A possibility here is to use Python more advanced descriptors to get the variables authomatically "get" and "set" with an " = " statement - like the "property" built in function allows you to do - but I'd specialize the getters and setters in this case to account for the validation as well. Feel free do direct message me if you want to go this way. –  jsbueno Nov 1 '10 at 22:46
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

At the very least you can use Python's unusual comparison syntax like this:

if (self.hystInt.get().isdigit() and (200 <= int(self.hystInt.get()) <= 500)):
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I think the original code is more readable. This code requires one to stop and mentally parse the code. –  Bryan Oakley Nov 1 '10 at 21:16
2  
@Bryan: just when you don't know Python and are too used with other programing Languages. The logic way e learn back in school, with Math uses the same syntax as Python allows: x < y < z -- and it is clearly more readble than (x < y) and (y < z) which was the only parseable way back when C was invented. –  jsbueno Nov 1 '10 at 22:42
    
@jsbueno: I agree that in some circumstances it is easier to read, especially when it is of the form x < y < z. However, in this case there are too many syntactic character plus and and clause that make it hard to scan the line IMO. –  Bryan Oakley Nov 1 '10 at 23:13
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def validate(num):
    try:
        return 200 <= int(num) <= 500
    except ValueError:
        return False

Simple is good!

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2  
+1 for the Python way, Better to ask forgiveness than permission. –  Davy8 Nov 1 '10 at 21:38
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Do this.

try:
    hystInt= int(self.hystInt.get())
    if 200 <= hystInt <= 500:
        Valid.
    else:
        Out of bounds.
except ValueError, e:
    Not even a number.
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How about a temporary variable? I think the real problem (both in in readability and (very!) marginally in performance) is that you're calling the get() method three times.

histint = self.hystInt.get()
if (histint.isdigit() and 
    (200 <= int(histint) <= 500))
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To reduce the tedious coding you could do something along these lines:

valid_hystInt = lambda self, low, high: (
    self.hystInt.get().isdigit() and (low <= int(self.hystInt.get()) <= high)
)

class Class:
    hystInt = HystInt() # or whatever

    def some_method(self):
        if valid_hystInt(self, 200, 500):
            pass # use it

or possibly the even more general:

valid_int_field = lambda field, low, high: (
    field.get().isdigit() and (low <= int(field.get()) <= high)
)

class Class:
    hystInt = HystInt() # or whatever

    def some_method(self):
        if valid_int_field(self.hystInt, 200, 500):
            pass # use it
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