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set -e (or a script starting with #!/bin/sh -e) is extremely useful to automatically bomb out if there is a problem. It saves me having to error check every single command that might fail.

How do I get the equivalent of this inside a function?

For example, I have the following script that exits immediately on error with an error exit status:

#!/bin/sh -e

echo "the following command could fail:"
false
echo "this is after the command that fails"

The output is as expected:

the following command could fail:

Now I'd like to wrap this into a function:

#!/bin/sh -e

my_function() {
    echo "the following command could fail:"
    false
    echo "this is after the command that fails"
}

if ! my_function; then
    echo "dealing with the problem"
fi

echo "run this all the time regardless of the success of my_function"

Expected output:

the following command could fail:
dealing with the problem
run this all the time regardless of the success of my_function

Actual output:

the following output could fail:
this is after the command that fails
run this all the time regardless of the success of my_function

(ie. the function is ignoring set -e)

This presumably is expected behaviour. My question is: how do I get effect and usefuless of set -e inside a shell function? I've found the same question asked outside Stack Overflow but no suitable answer.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You will need to call your function in a sub shell (inside brackets ()) to achieve this.

I think you want to write your script like this:

#!/bin/sh -e

my_function() {
    echo "the following command could fail:"
    false
    echo "this is after the command that fails"
}

(my_function)

if [ $? -ne 0 ] ; then
    echo "dealing with the problem"
fi

echo "run this all the time regardless of the success of my_function"

Then the output is (as desired):

the following command could fail:
dealing with the problem
run this all the time regardless of the success of my_function
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2  
My experiments show that using a subshell (my_function) call doesn't help here. You have just moved my_function execution out of the if statement and this has helped. I reopened this question here stackoverflow.com/questions/5754845/set-e-in-a-function . Please take a look if you know the correct answer. I appreciate it. –  agsamek Apr 22 '11 at 11:16
1  
When running the script above I only get this single line of output: the following command could fail:. The script seems to quit completely on the false command which makes it impossible to implement error handling. Tried it using bash and dash. –  Daniel Alder Sep 24 '14 at 11:59

From documentation of set -e:

When this option is on, if a simple command fails for any of the reasons listed in Consequences of Shell Errors or returns an exit status value >0, and is not part of the compound list following a while, until, or if keyword, and is not a part of an AND or OR list, and is not a pipeline preceded by the ! reserved word, then the shell shall immediately exit.

In your case, false is a part of a pipeline preceded by ! and a part of if. So the solution is to rewrite your code so that it isn't.

In other words, there's nothing special about functions here. Try:

set -e
! { false; echo hi; }
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There's no pipeline. It's a compound command as opposed to a simple command. –  Dennis Williamson Nov 2 '10 at 1:21
    
There is a pipeline, although a degenerate one. If you check with the standard (particularly "2.10.2 Shell Grammar Rules"), you'll see that a pipeline consists of at least one command (which may be simple, compound of func.def.) preceded by optional bang sign. There's no other way to introduce a negation except pipeline. –  Roman Cheplyaka Nov 2 '10 at 6:21
    
Now, to be part of is really ambiguous. One might expect (and I did) that this refers to immediate parts. In this interpretation false would be a part of the brace group, and the brace group would be a part of the pipeline, but false would not be a part of the pipeline. But apparently all implementations I have share another opinion -- where a part of a statement may be embedded however deeply in this statement. –  Roman Cheplyaka Nov 2 '10 at 6:27
    
s/compound of func.def./compound or func.def./ –  Roman Cheplyaka Nov 2 '10 at 6:34
    
Any link to the documentation of set -e? –  Dmitri Zaitsev Apr 27 at 11:47

I know this isn't what you asked, but you may or may not be aware that the behavior you seek is built into "make". Any part of a "make" process that fails aborts the run. It's a wholly different way of "programming", though, than shell scripting.

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Join all commands in your function with the && operator. It's not too much trouble and will give the result you want.

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Yes, I realise I can do this, but I don't like it. It's messy, too easy to miss one when modifying the function later, and gets complicated when dealing with other shell constructs and with control flow. The whole point of set -e is to avoid having to do this. I will accept the answer "there is no such mechanism" though! –  Robie Basak Nov 1 '10 at 21:06

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