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How do you give a C# Auto-Property a default value? I either use the constructor, or revert to the old syntax.

Using the Constructor:

class Person 
{
    public Person()
    {
        Name = "Default Name";
    }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

Using normal property syntax (with a default value)

private string name = "Default Name";
public string Name 
{
    get 
    {
        return name;
    }
    set
    {
        name = value;
    }
}

Is there a better way?

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24  
It's misleading, it even says in the IntelliSense, "Sets the default value for a property", but on MSDN it says, "A DefaultValueAttribute will not cause a member to be automatically initialized with the attribute's value. You must set the initial value in your code.", Urg! –  Chris Feb 22 '10 at 5:11
14  
This is one of the few places where vb.net has the clear upper hand, they can set default values for properties in the definition. –  Blindy Aug 9 '10 at 8:35
3  
Why do you not want to back the property with an initialized field? This is how the compiler implements automatic properties anyway. Also an explicit field has the advantage that you can declare it readonly. –  finnw Nov 9 '10 at 12:52
3  
@finnw IMO it's about improving code readability. –  Keith Nov 17 '11 at 2:26
3  
This is the only thing I love VB.NET over C#. Public Property MyName As String = "Default Name" –  Alex Yeung Dec 3 '12 at 7:21

17 Answers 17

up vote 461 down vote accepted

In C# 5 and earlier, to give auto implemented properties a default value, you have to do it in a constructor.

The ability to have auto property initializers is scheduled for inclusion in C# 6.0 (the next version of VB.Net will have it as well). The C# syntax will be:

public int X { get; set; } = x; // C# 6 or higher
share|improve this answer
54  
you are incorrect. abstract classes can have constructors. –  Darren Kopp Mar 1 '11 at 18:31
9  
abstract classes usually have protected constructors, actually. –  Ludovic Jul 29 '11 at 19:06
12  
abstract classes usually have whatever accessibility you give to them. if you don't specify a constructor you always have a default public constructor –  Darren Kopp Jul 29 '11 at 23:04
13  
Constructors to abstract classes should never be given public access since they can never be instantiated. To do so would be a FxCop violation (hopefully you're using it) and a violation of .NET Framework Design Guidelines - amazon.com/Framework-Design-Guidelines-Conventions-Libraries/dp/… –  Dave Black Feb 8 '12 at 14:16
6  
@HankSchultz no, object initializer is just sugar the compiler does. what actually is emitted is this: var person = new Person(); persion.Name = "My Value"; Constructor always runs first –  Darren Kopp Jun 19 '13 at 23:07

Though the intended use of the attribute is not to actually set the values of the properties, you can use reflection to always set them anyway...The unintended consequences are not clear to me at the moment (e.g. if some Microsoft coder set the meta tag incorrectly, but actually defaulted it to something else in the constructor could you override that?)

Anyway...

public class DefaultValuesTest
{    
    public DefaultValuesTest()
    {               
        foreach (PropertyDescriptor property in TypeDescriptor.GetProperties(this))
        {
            DefaultValueAttribute myAttribute = (DefaultValueAttribute)property.Attributes[typeof(DefaultValueAttribute)];

            if (myAttribute != null)
            {
                property.SetValue(this, myAttribute.Value);
            }
        }
    }

    public void DoTest()
    {
        var db = DefaultValueBool;
        var ds = DefaultValueString;
        var di = DefaultValueInt;
    }


    [System.ComponentModel.DefaultValue(true)]
    public bool DefaultValueBool { get; set; }

    [System.ComponentModel.DefaultValue("Good")]
    public string DefaultValueString { get; set; }

    [System.ComponentModel.DefaultValue(27)]
    public int DefaultValueInt { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer
5  
This should get upvoted, as it actually helped me! –  Marcel Oct 13 '11 at 13:35
1  
Yes,It's the answer:[System.ComponentModel.DefaultValue(GiveAnyTypeOfDefaultValueHere)] –  WAP Guy Feb 10 '12 at 5:44
5  
+1 for ingenuity, but this can be really slow. Imagine newing a bunch of items in an inner loop without realizing the constructors use reflection... –  Patrick M Nov 1 '12 at 20:04
1  
If the base class uses a static constructor to load the attributes and values into a dictionary, there's no overhead on each class! –  Gayot Fow Jul 4 '13 at 19:16
7  
U're recommending really bad thing. It is quite slow and introduces reflection to quite simple class. If it wasn't so slow it would be okay to use some kind of il-weaving with such attribute (PostSharp, Fody, etc), but the performance... –  Grigory Aug 21 '13 at 13:03

When you inline an initial value for a variable it will be done implicitly in the constructor anyway.

I would argue that this syntax is best practice:

class Person 
{
    public Person()
    {
        //do anything before variable assignment

        //assign initial values
        Name = "Default Name";

        //do anything after variable assignment
    }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

As this gives you more clear control of the order values are assigned.

share|improve this answer
9  
It's only best practice if constructors need to initialize in different ways (across multiple constructors). If they all initialize the same way, isn't what you are suggesting bad practice if I also want Person(string name), and then later I add property int ID and I have yet another constructor Person(string name, int id)? Violation of open to extension, closed to modification. I argue that it's best practice to initialize in line so long as all constructors initialize the member the same way. –  dbobrowski Sep 13 '12 at 19:12
    
@dbobrowski if I has multiple constructors I'd use public Person(string name, int id) : this() syntax, but you have a point. This gives you more fine control of exactly when properties are initialised at the cost of the inline option's simpler maintainability. –  Keith Mar 8 '13 at 16:35
1  
@Keith I'd prefer public Person():this("Default Name"), rather than setting Name twice. –  ANeves Jan 31 at 17:43

DefaultValueAttribute ONLY work in the vs designer. It will not initialize the property to that value.

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6  
+1: [DefaultValue] is used to tell the designed what the default value is. If, in the properties window, you set the value to this default, then the value is not written to the generated code. Similarly, non-default values are shown in bold in the properties window. Of course, this only works if [DefaultValue] actually has the correct value. It does nothing to enforce this. –  Roger Lipscombe May 9 '10 at 19:08
5  
DefaultValueAttribute is not just for the designer. However, a "default value" is not the same as an "initial value". –  Ben Voigt Jun 3 '11 at 2:11

Sometimes I use this, if I don't want it to be actually set and persisted in my db:

class Person
{
    private string _name; 
    public string Name 
    { 
        get 
        {
            return string.IsNullOrEmpty(_name) ? "Default Name" : _name;
        } 

        set { _name = value; } 
    }
}

Obviously if it's not a string then I might make the object nullable ( double?, int? ) and check if it's null, return a default, or return the value it's set to.

Then I can make a check in my repository to see if it's my default and not persist, or make a backdoor check in to see the true status of the backing value, before saving.

Hope that helps!

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22  
return _name ?? "Default Name"; probably even is more clear that your –  abatishchev Aug 9 '10 at 8:11
10  
@abatishchev: though that is not the same. crucibles code would return "Default Name" if the string is "" or null, but using your approach would return "Default Name" only in case it is null. Also, it is discussible whether "??" or "IsNullOrEmpty" is more clear. –  phresnel Dec 16 '10 at 13:28
6  
@phresnel: If property value can be "" and it's the same as null then you're right. Otherwise "" is meaningful value and my code is better –  abatishchev Dec 17 '10 at 6:51

little complete sample:

private bool bShowGroup ;
[Description("Show the group table"), Category("Sea"),DefaultValue(true)]
public bool ShowGroup
{
    get { return bShowGroup; }
    set { bShowGroup = value; }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Must add "System.ComponentModel" to the uses for this to work. –  Cipi Aug 23 '10 at 8:58
2  
+1 Simpler response, better way to do it in my humble optinion! –  daitangio Apr 29 '11 at 9:01
19  
That won't work. DefaultValueAttribute is just a serialization hint, it will not set ShowGroup to true because the default value for any boolean is false. –  Boris B. Jul 29 '11 at 13:05

You should not add a default to the constructor; this will mean that in the creation of the object the property will have to be assigned to twice (once as null, then again in the constructor). If you require a default value for a property it should broken out as a normal property (or possibly deferred to a builder in a creational pattern).

One other option is to do what ASP.Net does and define defaults via an attribute:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.componentmodel.defaultvalueattribute.aspx

But again, I would simply break out the property as this is the clearest and most efficient option.

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My solution is to use a custom attribute that provides default value property initialization by constant or using property type initializer.

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Property, AllowMultiple = false, Inherited = true)]
public class InstanceAttribute : Attribute
{
    public bool IsConstructorCall { get; private set; }
    public object[] Values { get; private set; }
    public InstanceAttribute() : this(true) { }
    public InstanceAttribute(object value) : this(false, value) { }
    public InstanceAttribute(bool isConstructorCall, params object[] values)
    {
        IsConstructorCall = isConstructorCall;
        Values = values ?? new object[0];
    }
}

To use this attribute it's necessary to inherit a class from special base class-initializer or use a static helper method:

public abstract class DefaultValueInitializer
{
    protected DefaultValueInitializer()
    {
        InitializeDefaultValues(this);
    }

    public static void InitializeDefaultValues(object obj)
    {
        var props = from prop in obj.GetType().GetProperties()
                    let attrs = prop.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(InstanceAttribute), false)
                    where attrs.Any()
                    select new { Property = prop, Attr = ((InstanceAttribute)attrs.First()) };
        foreach (var pair in props)
        {
            object value = !pair.Attr.IsConstructorCall && pair.Attr.Values.Length > 0
                            ? pair.Attr.Values[0]
                            : Activator.CreateInstance(pair.Property.PropertyType, pair.Attr.Values);
            pair.Property.SetValue(obj, value, null);
        }
    }
}

Usage example:

public class Simple : DefaultValueInitializer
{
    [Instance("StringValue")]
    public string StringValue { get; set; }
    [Instance]
    public List<string> Items { get; set; }
    [Instance(true, 3,4)]
    public Point Point { get; set; }
}

public static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var obj = new Simple
        {
            Items = {"Item1"}
        };
    Console.WriteLine(obj.Items[0]);
    Console.WriteLine(obj.Point);
    Console.WriteLine(obj.StringValue);
}

Output:

Item1
(X=3,Y=4)
StringValue
share|improve this answer

Starting with C# 6.0, We can assign default value to auto-implemented properties.

public string Name { get; set; } = "Some Name";

We can also create read-only auto implemented property like:

public string Name { get; } = "Some Name";

See: C# 6: First reactions , Initializers for automatically implemented properties - By Jon Skeet

share|improve this answer
class Person 
{    
    /// Gets/sets a value indicating whether auto 
    /// save of review layer is enabled or not
    [System.ComponentModel.DefaultValue(true)] 
    public bool AutoSaveReviewLayer { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer
17  
Welcome to Stack Overflow! Just so you know, bumping up an old question like this is generally frowned upon unless you have some good new information. However, in this case, several others have already posted about the DefaultValue attribute. If someone else has already posted what you were going to say, it's more appropriate to upvote them by clicking on the up arrow above the number next to their answer. –  fire.eagle May 26 '11 at 19:34
7  
@fire: Commenting requires 50 reputation. Voting also requires reputation, IIRC. –  Ben Voigt Jun 3 '11 at 2:12
1  
-1 as this does not initializes the property to the default value. –  Gyum Fox Aug 7 at 8:03

Have you tried using the DefaultValueAttribute or ShouldSerialize and Reset methods in conjunction with the constructor? I feel like one of these two methods is necessary if you're making a class that might show up on the designer surface or in a property grid.

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3  
No, those only work in the designer, not in "real life". –  Hans Kesting Jul 26 '10 at 14:21
1  
@Hans: They do work "in real life", but only for setting a default value (this affects xml serialization, for example). What's wanted here is not a "default value" but an "initial value". –  Ben Voigt Jun 3 '11 at 2:09

Personally, I don't see the point of making it a property at all if you're not going to do anything at all beyond the auto-property. Just leave it as a field. The encapsulation benefit for these item are just red herrings, because there's nothing behind them to encapsulate. If you ever need to change the underlying implementation you're still free to refactor them as properties without breaking any dependent code.

Hmm... maybe this will be the subject of it's own question later

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2  
@Joel: data binding and other reflection-based tools often expect properties rather than fields. –  Chris Farmer Sep 3 '08 at 3:59
8  
You cannot refactor a field into an auto property without breaking the calling code. It might look the same same but the generated code is different. With auto properties the calling code calls get_propname and set_propname behind the covers, whereas it just access the field directly if it's a field. –  David Reis Jul 28 '09 at 23:37
1  
Yes, this is very old- I've since revised my position: stackoverflow.com/questions/205568/… –  Joel Coehoorn Jul 28 '09 at 23:53
    
You cannot access a field across AppDomain boundaries, either -- only a property or method. –  Jacob Krall Nov 6 '09 at 18:00
    
And you cannot declare a field in an interface only a property –  yoel halb Aug 7 '13 at 2:22

To clarify, yes, you need to set default values in the constructor for class derived objects. You will need to ensure the constructor exists with the proper access modifier for construction where used. If the object is not instantiated, e.g. it has no constructor (e.g. static methods) then the default value can be set by the field. The reasoning here is that the object itself will be created only once and you do not instantiate it.

@Darren Kopp - good answer, clean, and correct. And to reiterate, you CAN write constructors for Abstract methods. You just need to access them from the base class when writing the constructor:

Constructor at Base Class:

public BaseClassAbstract()
{
    this.PropertyName = "Default Name";
}

Constructor at Derived / Concrete / Sub-Class:

public SubClass() : base() { }

The point here is that the instance variable drawn from the base class may bury your base field name. Setting the current instantiated object value using "this." will allow you to correctly form your object with respect to the current instance and required permission levels (access modifiers) where you are instantiating it.

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I think this would do it for ya givng SomeFlag a default of false.

private bool _SomeFlagSet = false;
public bool SomeFlag
{
    get
    {
        if (!_SomeFlagSet)
            SomeFlag = false;        

        return SomeFlag;
    }
    set
    {
        if (!_SomeFlagSet)
            _SomeFlagSet = true;

        SomeFlag = value;        
    }
}
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public Class ClassName{
    public int PropName{get;set;}
    public ClassName{
        PropName=0;  //Default Value
    }
}
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[DefaultValue(false)]
private bool MyProperty { get; set; }

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.componentmodel.defaultvalueattribute%28v=vs.110%29.aspx

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1  
this attribute has already been noted in a previous answer, make sure you read those first... –  sweaver2112 Nov 25 at 15:53

initialize in line, using constructors to initialize is bad practice and will lead to more breaking changes later.

share|improve this answer
    
-1 Are you referring to declaring the value of a variable in the same line as its definition? Since we're talking about properties here, that doesn't apply. –  doppelgreener Apr 26 '13 at 0:25

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