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I have implemented in my app the mitigation to CSRF attacks following the informations that I have read on some blog post around the internet. In particular these post have been the driver of my implementation

Basically those articles and recommendations says that to prevent the CSRF attack anybody should implement the following code:

1) Add the [ValidateAntiForgeryToken] on every action that accept the POST Http verb

[HttpPost]
[ValidateAntiForgeryToken]
public ActionResult SomeAction( SomeModel model ) {
}

2) Add the <%= Html.AntiForgeryToken() %> helper inside forms that submits data to the server

<div style="text-align:right; padding: 8px;">
    <%= Html.AntiForgeryToken() %>
    <input type="submit" id="btnSave" value="Save" />
</div>

Anyway in some parts of my app I am doing Ajax POSTs with jQuery to the server without having any form at all. This happens for example where I am letting the user to click on an image to do a specific action.

Suppose I have a table with a list of activities. I have an image on a column of the table that says "Mark activity as completed" and when the user click on that activity I am doing the Ajax POST as in the following sample:

$("a.markAsDone").click(function (event) {
    event.preventDefault();
    $.ajax({
        type: "post",
        dataType: "html",
        url: $(this).attr("rel"),
        data: {},
        success: function (response) {
            // ....
        }
    });
});

How can I use the <%= Html.AntiForgeryToken() %> in these cases? Should I include the helper call inside the data parameter of the Ajax call?

Sorry for the long post and thanks very much for helping out

EDIT:

As per jayrdub answer I have used in the following way

$("a.markAsDone").click(function (event) {
    event.preventDefault();
    $.ajax({
        type: "post",
        dataType: "html",
        url: $(this).attr("rel"),
        data: {
            AddAntiForgeryToken({}),
            id: parseInt($(this).attr("title"))
        },
        success: function (response) {
            // ....
        }
    });
});
share|improve this question
    
The David Hayden link now 404s, it appears that he's migrated his blog to a new CMS, but didn't migrate all the old content over. –  Cupcake Jan 2 '13 at 17:20

12 Answers 12

up vote 118 down vote accepted

I use a simple js function like this

AddAntiForgeryToken = function(data) {
    data.__RequestVerificationToken = $('#__AjaxAntiForgeryForm input[name=__RequestVerificationToken]').val();
    return data;
};

Since every form on a page will have the same value for the token, just put something like this in your top-most master page

<%-- used for ajax in AddAntiForgeryToken() --%>
<form id="__AjaxAntiForgeryForm" action="#" method="post"><%= Html.AntiForgeryToken()%></form>  

Then in your ajax call do (edited to match your second example)

$.ajax({
    type: "post",
    dataType: "html",
    url: $(this).attr("rel"),
    data: AddAntiForgeryToken({ id: parseInt($(this).attr("title")) }),
    success: function (response) {
        // ....
    }
});
share|improve this answer
3  
Nice, I like the encapsulation of the token fetching. –  jball Nov 2 '10 at 1:18
    
Yeah, that's nice since a lot of times you do ajax posts you don't even have a form on the page to get the token from –  JeremyWeir Nov 2 '10 at 1:21
    
@jayrdub: thanks for your response! Where do I have to place the small js function? I have placed inside a js file of common function and either in the master page but Chrome give me an error when I use it. It says Unexpected token (. Please see my question edit to see how I am using it. –  Lorenzo Nov 2 '10 at 1:50
1  
@Lorenzo, put your custom data inside the call to AddAntiForgeryToken, like so: data: AddAntiForgeryToken({ id: parseInt($(this).attr("title")) }), –  jball Nov 2 '10 at 2:15
1  
How bad an idea would it be to use ajaxSend or override ajax to always augment data with the anti-forgery token? Maybe adding some check to make sure that the url is destined for your server. –  ta.speot.is Jul 4 '13 at 6:14

I like the solution provided by 360Airwalk, but it may be improved a bit.

The first problem is that if you make $.post() with empty data, jQuery doesn't add a Content-Type header, and in this case ASP.NET MVC fails to receive and check the token. So you have to ensure the header is always there.

Another improvement is support of all HTTP verbs with content: POST, PUT, DELETE etc. Though you may use only POSTs in your application, it's better to have a generic solution and verify that all data you receive with any verb has an anti-forgery token.

$(document).ready(function () {
    var securityToken = $('[name=__RequestVerificationToken]').val();
    $(document).ajaxSend(function (event, request, opt) {
        if (opt.hasContent && securityToken) {   // handle all verbs with content
            var tokenParam = "__RequestVerificationToken=" + encodeURIComponent(securityToken);
            opt.data = opt.data ? [opt.data, tokenParam].join("&") : tokenParam;
            // ensure Content-Type header is present!
            if (opt.contentType !== false || options.contentType) {
                request.setRequestHeader( "Content-Type", opt.contentType);
            }
        }
    });
});
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 you are right, i've not thought of the empty post call issue. thanks for the input. you were right about that we do not use delete/put yet in our project. –  360Airwalk Sep 19 '12 at 15:37
1  
+1 for saving me from having to add the function to all the jQuery.Ajax calls –  Dragos Durlut Oct 9 '12 at 7:40
1  
+1 Just as a note for posterity, the jQuery documentation for .ajaxSend() states "As of jQuery 1.8, the .ajaxSend() method should only be attached to document." api.jquery.com/ajaxsend –  RJ Cuthbertson Aug 28 at 19:22
    
Thank you, @RJCuthbertson, I modified the code. –  Bronx Sep 5 at 1:27

i was just implementing this actual problem in my current project. i did it for all ajax-POSTs that needed an authenticated user.

First off i decided to hook my jquery ajax calls so i do not to repeat myself too often. this javascript snippet ensures all ajax (post) calls will add my request validation token to the request. Note: the name __RequestVerificationToken is used by the .Net framework so i can utilize the standard Anti-CSRF features as shown below.

$(document).ready(function () {
    securityToken = $('[name=__RequestVerificationToken]').val();
    $('body').bind('ajaxSend', function (elm, xhr, s) {
        if (s.type == 'POST' && typeof securityToken != 'undefined') {
            if (s.data.length > 0) {
                s.data += "&__RequestVerificationToken=" + encodeURIComponent(securityToken);
            }
            else {
                s.data = "__RequestVerificationToken=" + encodeURIComponent(securityToken);
            }
        }
    });
});

In your Views where you need the token to be available to the above javascript just use the common HTML-Helper. You can basically add this code whereever you want. I placed it within a if(Request.IsAuthenticated) statement:

@Html.AntiForgeryToken() // you can provide a string as salt when needed which needs to match the one on the controller

In your controller simply use the standard ASP.Net MVC Anti-CSRF mechanism. I did it like this (though i actually used Salt).

[HttpPost]
[Authorize]
[ValidateAntiForgeryToken]
public JsonResult SomeMethod(string param)
{
    // do something
    return Json(true);
}

With Firebug or a similar tool you can easily see how your POST requests now have a __RequestVerificationToken parameter appended.

share|improve this answer
    
good solution. thx. –  hennson Jul 5 '12 at 9:49

Don't use Html.AntiForgeryToken. Instead, use AntiForgery.GetTokens and AntiForgery.Validate from Web API as described in Preventing Cross-Site Request Forgery (CSRF) Attacks.

share|improve this answer
    
For controller action methods that model bind a server model type to the posted AJAX JSON, having the content type as "application/json" is required for the proper model binder to be used. Unfortunately, this precludes using form data, required by the [ValidateAntiForgeryToken] attribute, so your method is the only way I could find to make it work. My only question is, does it still work in a web farm or multiple Azure web role instances? Do you @Edward, or anyone else know if this is a problem? –  Richard B May 15 '13 at 22:27
    
@Edward Brey Can you please elaborate on why we shouldn't use it? –  Odys Feb 11 at 22:43
1  
@Odys: There's nothing inherently wrong with Html.AntiForgeryToken, but it has downsides: requires a form, requires jQuery, and assumes undocumented Html.AntiForgeryToken implementation details. Still, it's fine in many contexts. My statement "Don't use Html.AntiForgeryToken" probably comes off too strong. My meaning is that it's not intended to be used with Web API, whereas the more flexible AntiForgery.GetTokens is. –  Edward Brey Feb 11 at 22:59
    
thx! I had to change it a bit to make it work for an MVC5 controller, but this was the solution –  jao Aug 25 at 8:15

I know there are a lot of other answers, but this article is nice and concise and forces you to check all of your HttpPosts, not just some of them:

http://richiban.wordpress.com/2013/02/06/validating-net-mvc-4-anti-forgery-tokens-in-ajax-requests/

It uses HTTP headers instead of trying to modify the form collection.

Server

//make sure to add this to your global action filters
[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Class)]
public class ValidateAntiForgeryTokenOnAllPosts : AuthorizeAttribute
{
    public override void OnAuthorization( AuthorizationContext filterContext )
    {
        var request = filterContext.HttpContext.Request;

        //  Only validate POSTs
        if (request.HttpMethod == WebRequestMethods.Http.Post)
        {
            //  Ajax POSTs and normal form posts have to be treated differently when it comes
            //  to validating the AntiForgeryToken
            if (request.IsAjaxRequest())
            {
                var antiForgeryCookie = request.Cookies[AntiForgeryConfig.CookieName];

                var cookieValue = antiForgeryCookie != null
                    ? antiForgeryCookie.Value 
                    : null;

                AntiForgery.Validate(cookieValue, request.Headers["__RequestVerificationToken"]);
            }
            else
            {
                new ValidateAntiForgeryTokenAttribute()
                    .OnAuthorization(filterContext);
            }
        }
    }
}

Client

var token = $('[name=__RequestVerificationToken]').val();
var headers = {};
headers["__RequestVerificationToken"] = token;

$.ajax({
    type: 'POST',
    url: '/Home/Ajax',
    cache: false,
    headers: headers,
    contentType: 'application/json; charset=utf-8',
    data: { title: "This is my title", contents: "These are my contents" },
    success: function () {
        ...
    },
    error: function () {
        ...
    }
});
share|improve this answer
2  
The attribute from the article you linked too combined with Bronx's response is the ultimate DRY solution to this problem. –  TugboatCaptain Apr 2 at 0:47
1  
Great find. I edited your answer to include the code snippets so the answer stands on its own, but I hope people will read the rest of the article as well. This appears to be a very clean solution. –  Tim Medora Apr 17 at 21:24
    
thanks Tim, it is an excellent idea, its frustrating when a link goes dead and the answer becomes worthless. I've started doing this on all my new answers. –  viggity Jul 29 at 13:58

You can do this also:

$("a.markAsDone").click(function (event) {
event.preventDefault();
$.ajax({
    type: "post",
    dataType: "html",
    url: $(this).attr("rel"),
    data: $('<form>@Html.AntiForgeryToken()</form>').serialize(),
    success: function (response) {
        // ....
    }
});

});

This is using Razor, but if you're using WebForms syntax you can just as well use <%= %> tags

share|improve this answer

I think all you have to do is ensure that the "__RequestVerificationToken" input is included in the POST request. The other half of the information (i.e. the token in the user's cookie) is already sent automatically with an AJAX POST request.

E.g.,

$("a.markAsDone").click(function (event) {
    event.preventDefault();
    $.ajax({
        type: "post",
        dataType: "html",
        url: $(this).attr("rel"),
        data: { 
            "__RequestVerificationToken":
            $("input[name=__RequestVerificationToken]").val() 
        },
        success: function (response) {
            // ....
        }
    });
});
share|improve this answer
1  
After many hours experimenting with jQuery AJAX posting from within an MVC (Razor) page this was the simplest answer of all that worked for me. Just include your own data fields (or the viewModel I suppose) after the token as a new piece of data (but within the original data object). –  Ralph Bacon Sep 7 '13 at 13:29
    
How would I implement this if the AJAX function was in a .html page and not a Razor page? –  Bob the Builder Aug 13 at 10:29
    
If your html page doesn't have a server supplied AntiForgeryToken it's all moot anyhow. If it does (not sure how you're getting one in that case, but assuming you are), then the above would work just fine. If you're attempting to create a simply webpage that will post a request to a server expecting said token, and the server did not generate said page, then you're out of luck. That's essentially the point of the AntiForgeryToken... –  jball Aug 13 at 20:22

I aware it's been some time since this question was posted, but I found really useful resource, which discusses usage of AntiForgeryToken and makes it less troublesome to use. It also provides jquery plugin for easily including antiforgery token in AJAX calls:

Anti-Forgery Request Recipes For ASP.NET MVC And AJAX

I'm not contributing much, but maybe someone will find it useful.

share|improve this answer
    
That post is like a mile long! I'm sure it's great but tl;dr –  BritishDeveloper Apr 27 '12 at 14:25
    
Too bad, because it nicely covers subject. It not only tells you how to use the feature, but explains what problem it fixes and give you context to understand how to use it correctly. When it comes to security I think in-depth understanding is important. –  slawek Apr 27 '12 at 17:34
1  
If it's important it should be written in a way that encourages people to read it ;) –  BritishDeveloper Apr 30 '12 at 8:26

1.Define Function to get Token from server

@function {

    public string TokenHeaderValue()
    {
        string cookieToken, formToken;
        AntiForgery.GetTokens(null, out cookieToken, out formToken);
        return cookieToken + ":" + formToken;                
    }

}

2.Get token and set header before send to server

var token = '@TokenHeaderValue()';    

       $http({
           method: "POST",
           url: './MainBackend/MessageDelete',
           data: dataSend,
           headers: {
               'RequestVerificationToken': token
           }
       }).success(function (data) {
           alert(data)
       });

3. Onserver Validation on HttpRequestBase on method you handle Post/get

        string cookieToken = "";
        string formToken = "";
        string[] tokens = Request.Headers["RequestVerificationToken"].Split(':');
            if (tokens.Length == 2)
            {
                cookieToken = tokens[0].Trim();
                formToken = tokens[1].Trim();
            }
        AntiForgery.Validate(cookieToken, formToken);
share|improve this answer

Further to my comment against @JBall's answer that helped me along the way, this is the final answer that works for me. I'm using MVC and Razor and I'm submitting a form using jQuery AJAX so I can update a partial view with some new results and I didn't want to do a complete postback (and page flicker).

Add the @Html.AntiForgeryToken() inside the form as usual.

My AJAX submission button code (i.e. an onclick event) is:

//User clicks the SUBMIT button
$("#btnSubmit").click(function (event) {

//prevent this button submitting the form as we will do that via AJAX
event.preventDefault();

//Validate the form first
if (!$('#searchForm').validate().form()) {
    alert("Please correct the errors");
    return false;
}

//Get the entire form's data - including the antiforgerytoken
var allFormData = $("#searchForm").serialize();

// The actual POST can now take place with a validated form
$.ajax({
    type: "POST",
    async: false,
    url: "/Home/SearchAjax",
    data: allFormData,
    dataType: "html",
    success: function (data) {
        $('#gridView').html(data);
        $('#TestGrid').jqGrid('setGridParam', { url: '@Url.Action("GetDetails", "Home", Model)', datatype: "json", page: 1 }).trigger('reloadGrid');
    }
});

I've left the "success" action in as it shows how the partial view is being updated that contains an MvcJqGrid and how it's being refreshed (very powerful jqGrid grid and this is a brilliant MVC wrapper for it).

My controller method looks like this:

    //Ajax SUBMIT method
    [ValidateAntiForgeryToken]
    public ActionResult SearchAjax(EstateOutlet_D model) 
    {
        return View("_Grid", model);
    }

I have to admit to not being a fan of POSTing an entire form's data as a Model but if you need to do it then this is one way that works. MVC just makes the data binding too easy so rather than subitting 16 individual values (or a weakly-typed FormCollection) this is OK, I guess. If you know better please let me know as I want to produce robust MVC C# code.

share|improve this answer

AntiforgeryToken is still a pain, none of the examples above worked word for word for me. Too many for's there. So I combined them all. Need a @Html.AntiforgeryToken in a form hanging around iirc

Solved as so:

function Forgizzle(eggs) {
    eggs.__RequestVerificationToken =  $($("input[name=__RequestVerificationToken]")[0]).val();
    return eggs;
}

$.ajax({
            url: url,
            type: 'post',
            data: Forgizzle({ id: id, sweets: milkway }),
});

When in doubt, add more $ signs

share|improve this answer

Slight improvement to 360Airwalk solution. This imbeds the Anti Forgery Token within the javascript function, so @Html.AntiForgeryToken() no longer needs to be included on every view.

$(document).ready(function () {
    var securityToken = $('@Html.AntiForgeryToken()').attr('value');
    $('body').bind('ajaxSend', function (elm, xhr, s) {
        if (s.type == 'POST' && typeof securityToken != 'undefined') {
            if (s.data.length > 0) {
                s.data += "&__RequestVerificationToken=" + encodeURIComponent(securityToken);
            }
            else {
                s.data = "__RequestVerificationToken=" + encodeURIComponent(securityToken);
            }
        }
    });
});
share|improve this answer

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