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I just started programming so pointers and arrays confuse me. This program just assigns random numbers from 0 - 9 into array and prints them out

(#include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <time.h>)

int function(int *num[]){                         
     int i;
     for(i=0; i<10; i++){
          srand((unsigned)time(NULL));
          *num[i] = rand()%10;                     
          printf("%d", *num[i]);
     }
     return 0;
}

int main(){
     int num[10];
     function(&num);              // incompatable pointer type (how do i fix this?)
     return 0;
}

Thankyou

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5  
You might want to move the srand((unsigned)time(NULL)); outside the for() loop. –  No one in particular Nov 2 '10 at 1:52

4 Answers 4

Change your code to read something like this:

int function(int num[]){                          
     int i; 
     for(i=0; i<10; i++){ 
          srand((unsigned)time(NULL)); 
          num[i] = rand()%10;                      
          printf("%d", num[i]); 
     } 
     return 0; 
} 

int main(){ 
     int num[10]; 
     function(num);
     return 0; 
}

In main(), you are allocating an array of 10 integers. The call to function(num) passes the address of this array (technically, the address of the first element of the array) to the function() function. In a parameter declaration, int num[] is almost exactly equivalent to int *num (I'll let you ponder on that one). Finally, when you access the elements of num[] from within the function, you don't need any extra *. By using num[i], you are accessing the i'th element of the array pointed to by num.

It may help to remember that in C, the following are exactly the same:

num[i]
*(num+i)
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2  
No one has said this yet, but he should actually change it to int function(int num[], size_t len). Safety, people! –  Chris Lutz Nov 2 '10 at 2:13

You don't need to pass in a pointer to your array. Just pass in the array. I have fixed your pointer code below.

Also, you should not reset the seed (srand) through every iteration through the for loop.

int function(int num[]){                          
     int i; 
     srand((unsigned(time(NULL));
     for(i=0; i<10; i++){ 
          num[i] = rand()%10;                      
          printf("%d", num[i]); 
     } 
     return 0; 
}

int main(){ 
     int num[10]; 
     function(num);  
     return 0; 
} 
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-1 - This doesn't answer the actual programming issue he has with pointers. –  David Pfeffer Nov 2 '10 at 1:43

It all depends on what you want to achieve in the end.

(1) If your function function is intended to be used with arrays of run-time size, then you have to pass a pointer to the first element of the array. That is achieved by the following equivalent declarations

int function(int *num)

or

int function(int num[])

Inside the function you have to access the passed array as

num[i] = rand() % 10;  

And you call your function as

function(num); 

Of course, when the array size is a run-time value, it makes sense to pass that size to the function as well, meaning that your function should have the following interface

int function(int num[], size_t n)

And implement it for an array of size n, instead of hardcoding 10 directly into your implementation.

(2) If your function function is intended to be used with arrays of fixed compile-time size (10 in this case), then the better approach would be to pass a pointer to the entire array. It is achieved by the following declaration

int function(int (*num)[10])

Inside the function you have to access the passed array as

(*num)[i] = rand() % 10;  

And you call your function as

function(&num); 

So it is either (1) or (2).

What you currently have in your code looks like a mix of these two approaches. More precisely, you code looks like an attempt to implement the second approach, but it is missing some important parentheses :)

Most answers given to you so far suggest using the first approach. However, seeing that the array size is actually a compile-time constant in your case, I would suggest sticking with the second approach.

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Use either int *num or int num[], don't use both together as you have right now (int *num[]). An array is passed to a function as a pointer to the first element, i.e. int *num, which is equivalent to int num[].

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