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I wrote this class to compress and expand number lists to sequence strings, including step values when the the step value is greater than 1. The code still feels clunky. Are there libraries that can do something like this? Possibly simpler code?

import re

class Foo( object ):

    def __init__( self, num_list ):
        self.num_list = sorted( list( set( [ int(n) for n in num_list ] ) ) )
    # end def __init__

    def gen_seq_data( self ):
        self.seq_data       = list()
        index_offset        = None
        backward_step_value = None
        forward_step_value  = None
        sub_list            = list()
        sub_list_step_value = None
        for index, num in enumerate( self.num_list ):

            if index - 1 < 0:
                backward_step_value = None
            # end if
            else:
                backward_step_value = num - self.num_list[ index - 1 ]
            # end else

            try:
                forward_step_value = self.num_list[ index + 1 ] - num
            # end try
            except IndexError:
                forward_step_value = None
            # end except

            if backward_step_value is None:
                sub_list.append( num )
            # end if
            elif backward_step_value == forward_step_value:
                sub_list.append( num )
                if forward_step_value is None:
                    self.seq_data.append( ( sub_list_step_value, sub_list ) )
                # end if
            # end if
            elif backward_step_value == sub_list_step_value:
                sub_list.append( num )
                if sub_list:
                    self.seq_data.append( ( sub_list_step_value, sub_list ) )
                # end if
                sub_list = list()
            # end elif
            else:
                if sub_list:
                    self.seq_data.append( ( sub_list_step_value, sub_list ) )
                # end if
                sub_list = [ num ]
                if forward_step_value is None:
                    self.seq_data.append( ( sub_list_step_value, sub_list ) )
                # end if
            # end else

            try:
                sub_list_step_value = sub_list[ -1 ] - sub_list[ -2 ]
            # end try
            except IndexError:
                sub_list_step_value = None
            # end except
        # end for
    # end def gen_seq_object

    def format_elements( self ):
        format_elements = list()
        for step, num_list in self.seq_data:
            if step is None:
                format_elements.append( '%s' % ( num_list[ 0 ] ) )
            # end if
            elif step == 1:
                format_elements.append( '%s-%s' % ( num_list[ 0 ], num_list[ -1 ] ) )
            # end elif
            else:
                format_elements.append( '%s-%sx%s' % ( num_list[ 0 ], num_list[ -1 ], step ) )
            # end else
        # end for
        return format_elements
    # end def format_range

    def format_range( self ):
       return ','.join( self.format_elements() )
    # end def format_range

    def expand_range( self ):
        num_list = list()
        for r_token in self.format_range().split( ',' ):
            if r_token.isdigit():
                num_list.append( int( r_token ) )
            # end if
            elif '-' in r_token:
                if 'x' in r_token:
                    start, end, step = re.split( r'[-|x]', r_token )
                    num_list.extend( range( int( start ), int( end ) + 1, int( step ) ) )
                # end if
                else:
                    start, end = r_token.split( '-' )
                    num_list.extend( range( int( start ), int( end ) + 1 ) )
                # end else
           # end elif
        # end for
        return num_list
    # end def expand_range

# end class Foo

Input/output:

data = [ 1, 4, 5, 6, 10, 15, 16, 17, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 27, 28, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 56, 63, 66, 69, 72 ]

foo = Foo( data )
foo.gen_seq_data()

print data

print foo.format_range()
1,4-6,10,15-18,20-26x2,27,28,30-50x5,56,63-72x3

print foo.expand_range()
[1, 4, 5, 6, 10, 15, 16, 17, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 27, 28, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 56, 63, 66, 69, 72]
share|improve this question
    
Please fix your indentation. Your code is formatted incorrectly. Please (1) edit the question, (2) read the formatting instructions on the right side of the page and (3) avoid posting every piece of code you own. What problem do you have? What's the smallest piece of code that shows this problem? –  S.Lott Nov 2 '10 at 1:54
3  
@user494203: Throw away "# end if" etc lines; they are monstrously useless, especially the ones that occur just before elif and else. If you do that, people may be more inclined to read your code and suggest further unclunkings. –  John Machin Nov 2 '10 at 2:31
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2 Answers

One. Remove all #END comments. They are monstrously useless. Your indentation speaks for itself. Use it.

Two. Don't make this a class. It isn't a distinct object with distinct responsibilities. It's just an algorithm. Made up of functions. At best it's a class with all static methods.

Three. Never do this

    for index, num in enumerate( self.num_list ):
        if index - 1 < 0:
            backward_step_value = None
        # end if
        else:
            backward_step_value = num - self.num_list[ index - 1 ]
        # end else

If the first element is special, then treat it separately.

backward_step_value = self.num_list[0]
for num in self.num_list[1:]:

You rarely need the index for something like this. Indeed, the only reason for having the index appears to be to treat the first element specially.

Finally, this is a "reduction". Use a generator function

def reduce_list( some_list ):
    v= min(some_list)
    low, high = v, v
    for v in sorted(some_list)[1:]:
        if v == high+1: 
            high= high+1
        else:
            yield low, high
     yield low, high

That might yield your list of contiguous ranges. You can then format those.

format_elements( reduce_list( some_list ) )
share|improve this answer
    
This solution doesn't achieve the most tricky part of the OP's solution, namely identifying not just continuous ranges, but ranges with a fixed step of > 1. –  jchl Nov 2 '10 at 10:30
    
@jchl: Correct. The point wasn't to fix their code. The point was to provide a way to revise the code to be less "clunky". Including the step as a variable instead of 1 shouldn't be too hard to do as an extension to this. –  S.Lott Nov 2 '10 at 11:23
add comment

The following solution handles non-contiguous ranges, and also preserves the behavior of ignoring ranges of length 2.

def reduce_list(seq):
    l = sorted(set(seq))
    low = high = l[0]
    step = None
    for v in l[1:]:
        if step is None or v - high == step:
            # Extend the current range.
            step = v - high
            high = v
        elif high - low == step:
            # The current range only has two values.  Yield the
            # first value, and start a new range comprising the
            # second value and the current value.
            yield low, low, None
            step = v - high
            low = high
            high = v
        else:
            # Yield the current range, and start a new one.
            yield low, high, step
            low = high = v
            step = None
    if high - low == step:
        # The final range has only two values.  Yield them
        # individually.
        yield low, low, None
        step = None
        low = high
    yield low, high, step

def format_element(low, high, step):
    if step is None:
        assert low == high
        return "%s" % (low,)
    elif step == 1:
        return "%s-%s" % (low, high)
    else:
        return "%s-%sx%s" % (low, high, step)

def format_list(seq):
    return ','.join(format_element(*e) for e in seq)

Here's some test code:

def test( *args ):
    print args, "==", format_list(reduce_list(args))

test(1)
test(1, 2)
test(1, 2, 3)
test(0, 10)
test(0, 10, 20)
test(0, 10, 11, 12, 14, 16)
test(0, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64)
test(0, 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 9, 10)
test(0, 1, 3, 6, 10, 15, 21, 28)

which outputs:

(1,) == 1
(1, 2) == 1,2
(1, 2, 3) == 1-3
(0, 10) == 0,10
(0, 10, 20) == 0-20x10
(0, 10, 11, 12, 14, 16) == 0,10-12,14,16
(0, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64) == 0-4x2,8,16,32,64
(0, 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 9, 10) == 0,1,3,4,6,7,9,10
(0, 1, 3, 6, 10, 15, 21, 28) == 0,1,3,6,10,15,21,28
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your help. These are great solutions. –  Bip Nov 4 '10 at 21:08
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