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I recently posted one of my favourite interview whiteboard coding questions in "What's your more controversial programming opinion", which is to write a function that computes Pi using the Leibniz formula.

It can be approached in a number of different ways, and the exit condition takes a bit of thought, so I thought it might make an interesting code golf question. Shortest code wins!

Given that Pi can be estimated using the function 4 * (1 - 1/3 + 1/5 - 1/7 + ...) with more terms giving greater accuracy, write a function that calculates Pi to within 0.00001.

Edit: 3 Jan 2008

As suggested in the comments I changed the exit condition to be within 0.00001 as that's what I really meant (an accuracy 5 decimal places is much harder due to rounding and so I wouldn't want to ask that in an interview, whereas within 0.00001 is an easier to understand and implement exit condition).

Also, to answer the comments, I guess my intention was that the solution should compute the number of iterations, or check when it had done enough, but there's nothing to prevent you from pre-computing the number of iterations and using that number. I really asked the question out of interest to see what people would come up with.

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locked by Shog9 Apr 3 '15 at 16:41

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2  
When the answer is shorter than the program to compute it, there's not much point in golfing, is there? – JB. Jan 2 '09 at 18:32
1  
Computing the numerical value of Pi using the Leibniz formula is a complete wate of time due to its low rate of convergence (as mentioned in the wiki article you linked to). It's akin to teaching Bubblesort in a Uni CS course. – Mitch Wheat Jan 3 '09 at 1:56
4  
If someone asked me this in an interview I'd ask for a new question. The value of Pi is constant. Dumb question and a waste of interview time. Seriously an organization that thinks BS like this is a valid interview question... – jcollum Jan 3 '09 at 19:44
1  
@jcollum, and seriously a programmer who failed to produce the answer isn't worth any further questioning. – Jimmy Jan 9 '09 at 22:09
1  
also, at jcollum, it is not a perfectly known constant as it is irrational, so it is worth being able to compute it. This particular method may not be the most efficient but your statement is also 'Dumb'. – Cor_Blimey Oct 13 '12 at 19:59

46 Answers 46

C++

double LeibnizPi( double tolerance )
{
    double sum = 1.0;
    for( int plus_div = 5, minus_div = -3, limit = 10 / tolerance; plus_div < limit ; plus_div += 4, minus_div -= 4 )
        sum += 1./plus_div + 1./minus_div;
    return 4 * sum;
}
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After noting that

(= (- (/ 4 n)
      (/ 4 (+ n 2)))
   (/ 8 n (+ n 2)))

or, in a more familiar notation:

4    4      8
- - --- = ------
n   n+2   n(n+2)

Common Lisp, with a do* loop (62 essential characters):

(do* ((n 1 (+ n 4))
      (p 8/3 (+ p (/ 8 n (+ n 2)))))
     ((< (- pi p) 1e-6)
      p)

with a tail recursive function (70 essential characters):

(defun l (n p)
  (if (< (- pi p) 1e-6)
      p
      (l (+ n 4)
          (+ p (/ 8 n (+ n 2))))))
(l 1 0)

and with the extended loop (86 essential characters):

(loop for n from 1 by 4
      sum (/ 8 n (+ n 2)) into p
      until (< (- pi p) 1e-6)
      finally (return p))

all under the presumption that preliminary checks how far we have to go to get the desired accuracy are cheating.

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double d = 1; double s = 1; double pi = 0;

while(4.0 / d > 0.000001){
    pi += s*4.0/d;
    d+=2;
    s = -s;        
}
printf("%f\n", pi);
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Java

    double pi=0,s=-1,i=1;
    for (;i<1E6;i+=2)pi+=((1d/i)*(s=-s)); 
    pi*=4;
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VB 117 chars:

Function Pi()
  Dim t = 0D
  For n = 0 To 1000000
    t += Math.Pow(-1, n) / (2 * n + 1)
  Next
  Return 4 * t
End Function

VB LINQ 115 chars (omitting the unnecessary line continuation):

Function Pi()
  Return 4 * Enumerable.Range(0, 1000000) _
             .Sum(Function(n) Math.Pow(-1, n) / (2 * n + 1))
End Function

And then call:

Sub Main()
  Console.WriteLine("{0:n5}", Pi)
End Sub
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Another VB solution, using the rather cool aggregation syntax:

Public ReadOnly Pi As Double = 4 * Aggregate i In Enumerable.Range(0, 100000) _
                                   Select (-1) ^ i / (i * 2 + 1) Into Sum()

Expression only: 74 characters without unnecessary whitespaces.

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Erlang, ~126 chars:

-module (pi).
-export ([pi/0]).

pi() -> 4 * pi(0,1,1).
pi(T,M,D) ->
	A = 1 / D,
	if A > 0.00001 
	          -> pi(T+(M*A), M*-1, D+2);
	    true  -> T
	end.
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Here's mine in C++, probably the longest way of doing it :P

double pi(){
   bool add = true;
   double rPi = 0;
   for(long i = 1; i < 99999999; i=i+2)
   {
            double y = (double) i;
            double x = (double) 1;
            if(add)
            {
                   rPi = rPi + (x/y);
                   add = false;
            }
            else
            {
                    rPi = rPi - (x/y);
                    add = true;
            }
   }
            return (rPi * (double) 4);
   }
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I just sort of wrote this right after reading interview question in the topic on controversial opinion. It ain't pretty but it took me about 3-4 minutes and I am checking for accuracy in each loop. C++. I'll wake up tomorrow and post a solution that doesn't suck :)

double get_pi(int acc)
{

  double pi;
  double dynamicpart;
  int operationCoeff = 1;
  int denom = 3;
  while(1)
  { 
      dynamicpart =
         1/denom + operationCoeff*(denom+2);
      pi = 4*(1-dynamicpart);
      if(!(pi*acc*10-(int)pi*acc*10)) break;
)
      denom+=2;
      operationCoeff = -operationCoeff;
  }



}
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Uh....as a general rule in numeric processing one should sum series from the smallest term toward the largest to avoid trouble with loss of precision. So in

fortran77

stripped down (248 characters)

      function pi(n)
      pi=0.
      t=10**(-n-0.5)
      i=int(4/t)
      i=i/2
      s=-1.                     
      do 1 j=i*2+1,1,-2
         pi = pi + s/j
         s=-s
 1    continue
      pi=abs(pi)*4              
      return
      end

With a scaffold and comments (600 characters)

      program leibnitz

      n=5
      p=int(pi(n)*10.**n)/10.**n
      write(6,*)p 

      stop
      end

c     Returns pi computed to <n> digits by the leibniz formula
      function pi(n)
      pi=0.
c     find the smallest term we need by insuring that it is too small to
c     effect the interesting digits.
      t=10**(-n-0.5)
      i=int(4/t)
      i=i/2
      s=-1.                     ! sign of term, might be off by one, but
      do 1 j=i*2+1,1,-2
         pi = pi + s/j
         s=-s
 1    continue
      pi=abs(pi)*4              ! we fix the sign problem here
      return
      end

output:

   3.1415901

It seems to work for arbitrary number of digits up to 6ish where the precision of real runs out. It is not optimized for speed or for minimum number of operations.

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Java

void pi(){
	double x=1,y=1,d=1;
	for(;x<1E6;) { y=-y;d+=y/((2*x++)+1); }
	System.out.println(d*4);
}
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Python 3 (40 bytes)

sum(8/(n*(n+2))for n in range(1,5**8,4))

This version uses optimization from @Svante's answer.

print +7 bytes

print(sum(8/(n*(n+2))for n in range(1,5**8,4)))

Python 2.x +1 byte

sum(8./(n*(n+2))for n in range(1,5**8,4))

print +6 bytes

print sum(8./(n*(n+2))for n in range(1,5**8,4))

http://codepad.org/amtxUxKp

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Lua, 46 characters

p=4 for i=3,9^6,4 do p=p-8/i/(i+2)end print(p)
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PHP, 99 chars

$output =

${!${''}=function(){$pi=1;for($i=0;$i<pow(10,6);$i++){$pi+=($i%2?1:-1)/(3+$i*2);}return $pi*4;}}();

var_dump($output);

I guess there is some pretty tricks i don't know to reduce this answer ! Took the one-line output trick from this post.

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R - 27 chars

sum(4/seq(1,1e6,2)*c(1,-1))
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1 Character: . Written in "MySuperDuperDomainSpecificLanguageThatOnlyReturnsThisOneAnswerAndNothingElse".

Yes this is meant as a joke, but seriously unless you disallow DSLs then EVERY Code Golf contest could be won by some goober who writes his own language that uses one character to return just that one result...

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