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Few blob's have been duplicated in my database(oracle 11g), performed XOR operations on the blob using UTL_RAW.BIT_XOR. After that i wanted to count the number of set bits in the binary string, so wrote the code above.

During a small experiment, i wanted to see what is the hex and the integer value produced and wrote this procedure..

SQL> declare
2
3 vblob1 blob;
4
5 BEGIN
6
7 select leftiriscode INTO vblob1 FROM irisdata WHERE irisid=1;
8
9 dbms_output.put_line(rawtohex(vblob1));
10
11
12 dbms_output.put_line(UTL_RAW.CAST_TO_binary_integer(vblob1));
13
14
15 END;
16 /

OUTPUT: HEXVALUE:

0F0008020003030D030C1D1C3C383C330A3311373724764C54496C0A6B029B84840547A341BBA83D
BB5FB9DE4CDE5EFE96E1FC6169438344D604681D409F9F9F3BC07EE0C4E0C033A23B37791F59F84F
F94E4F664E3072B0229DA09D9F0F1FC600C2E380D6988C198B39517D157E7D66FE675237673D3D28
3A016C01411003343C76740F710F0F4F8FE976E1E882C186D316A63C0C7D7D7D7D397F016101B043
0176C37E767C7E0C7D010C8302C2D3E4F2ACE42F8D3F3F367A46F54285434ABB61BDB53CBF6C7CC0
F4C1C3F349B3F7BEB30E4A0CFE1C85180DC338C2C1C6E7A5CE3104303178724CCC5F451F573F3B24
7F24052000202003291F130F1B0E070C0E0D0F0E0F0B0B07070F1E1B330F27073F3F272E2F2F6F7B
2F2E1F2E4F7EFF7EDF3EBF253F3D2F39BF3D7F7FFED72FF39FE7773DBE9DBFBB3FE7A76E777DF55C
5F5F7ADF7FBD7F6AFE7B7D1FBE7F7F7DD7F63FBFBF2D3B7F7F5F2F7F3D7F7D3B3F3B7FFF4D676F7F
5D9FAD7DD17F7F6F6F0B6F7F3F767F1779364737370F7D3F5F377F2F3D3F7F1F2FE7709FB7BCB77B
0B77CF1DF5BF1F7F3D3E4E7F197F571F7D7E3F7F7F7D7F6F4F75FF6F7ECE2FFF793EFFEDB7BDDD1F
FF3BCE3F7F3FBF3D6C7FFF7F7F4FAF7F6FFFFF8D7777BF3AE30FAEEEEBCF5FEEFEE75FFEACFFDF0F
DFFFF77FFF677F4FFF7F7F1B5F1F5F146F1F1E1B3B1F3F273303170F370E250B

INTEGER VALUE: 15

There was a variance between the hex code and the integer value produced, so used the following python code to check the actual integer value.

print int("0F0008020003030D030C1D1C3C383C330A3311373724764C54496C0A6B029B84840547A341BBA83D
BB5FB9DE4CDE5EFE96E1FC6169438344D604681D409F9F9F3BC07EE0C4E0C033A23B37791F59F84F
F94E4F664E3072B0229DA09D9F0F1FC600C2E380D6988C198B39517D157E7D66FE675237673D3D28
3A016C01411003343C76740F710F0F4F8FE976E1E882C186D316A63C0C7D7D7D7D397F016101B043
0176C37E767C7E0C7D010C8302C2D3E4F2ACE42F8D3F3F367A46F54285434ABB61BDB53CBF6C7CC0
F4C1C3F349B3F7BEB30E4A0CFE1C85180DC338C2C1C6E7A5CE3104303178724CCC5F451F573F3B24
7F24052000202003291F130F1B0E070C0E0D0F0E0F0B0B07070F1E1B330F27073F3F272E2F2F6F7B
2F2E1F2E4F7EFF7EDF3EBF253F3D2F39BF3D7F7FFED72FF39FE7773DBE9DBFBB3FE7A76E777DF55C
5F5F7ADF7FBD7F6AFE7B7D1FBE7F7F7DD7F63FBFBF2D3B7F7F5F2F7F3D7F7D3B3F3B7FFF4D676F7F
5D9FAD7DD17F7F6F6F0B6F7F3F767F1779364737370F7D3F5F377F2F3D3F7F1F2FE7709FB7BCB77B
0B77CF1DF5BF1F7F3D3E4E7F197F571F7D7E3F7F7F7D7F6F4F75FF6F7ECE2FFF793EFFEDB7BDDD1F
FF3BCE3F7F3FBF3D6C7FFF7F7F4FAF7F6FFFFF8D7777BF3AE30FAEEEEBCF5FEEFEE75FFEACFFDF0F
DFFFF77FFF677F4FFF7F7F1B5F1F5F146F1F1E1B3B1F3F273303170F370E250B",16)

Answer:

611951595100708231079693644541095422704525056339295086455197024065285448917042457
942011979060274412229909425184116963447100932992139876977824261789243946528467423
887840013630358158845039770703659333212332565531927875442166643379024991542726916
563271158141698128396823655639931773363878078933197184072343959630467756337300811
165816534945075483141582643531294791665590339000206551162697220540050652439977992
246472159627917169957822698172925680112854091876671868161705785698942483896808137
210721991100755736178634253569843464062494863175653771387230991126430841565373390
924951878267929443498220727531299945275045612499928105876210478958806304156695438
684335624641395635997624911334453040399012259638042898470872203581555352191122920
004010193837249388365999010692555403377045768493630826307316376698443166439386014
145858084176544890282148970436631175577000673079418699845203671050174181808397880
048734270748095682582556024378558289251964544327507321930196203199459115159756564
507340111030285226951393012863778670390172056906403480159339130447254293412506482
027099835944315172972281427649277354815211185293109925602315480350955479477144523
387689192243720928249121486221114300503766209279369960344185651810101969585926336
07333771272398091

To get the set-bit count I have written the following code in C:

int bitsoncount(unsigned x)
{
    unsigned int b=0;
    if(x > 1)
    	b=1;	
    while(x &= (x - 1))
    	b++;	
    return b;
}

When I tried the same code in python it did not work. I am new to python through curiosity I'm experimenting, excuse me if am wrong.

def bitsoncount(x):
b=0;
if(x>1):
b=1;
while(x &= (x-1)):

I get an error at the last line, need some help in resolving this and implementing the logic in python :-)

I was interested in checking out the set bits version in python after what i have seen!

Thank You, Chaitanya

Related question: Best algorithm to count the number of set bits in a 32-bit integer?

share|improve this question

Python 2.6 or 3.0:

def bitsoncount(x):
    return bin(x).count('1')

Example:

>>> x = 123
>>> bin(x)
'0b1111011'
>>> bitsoncount(x) 
6

Or

Matt Howells's answer in Python:

def bitsoncount(i):
    assert 0 <= i < 0x100000000
    i = i - ((i >> 1) & 0x55555555)
    i = (i & 0x33333333) + ((i >> 2) & 0x33333333)
    return (((i + (i >> 4) & 0xF0F0F0F) * 0x1010101) & 0xffffffff) >> 24
share|improve this answer
1  
While this is great, I wish you could find a way to avoiding use lambda's in answers for beginners. Function def's are so much clearer for beginners to read. The second line of code helps them see the body and the intent. And it gives them a place to put docstrings. – S.Lott Jan 2 '09 at 19:46
1  
btw, @gnud's version is 4 times slower then bin(x).count('1'). – J.F. Sebastian Jan 10 '09 at 11:28
2  
gmpy.popcount() is quiet fast dalkescientific.com/writings/diary/archive/2008/07/03/… (the link is from stackoverflow.com/questions/109023/… thread) – J.F. Sebastian Jan 12 '09 at 13:38
1  
My very basic benchmark shows bin(x).count('1') about 23% faster than Matt Howell's function. It's a lot more understandable too. – FoxyLad Oct 11 '12 at 4:41
1  
@FoxyLad: As I said in the comment above bin()-based variant was 1.5 times faster on my machine. In addition bin() supports long integers as required by the question unlike Matt's answer, see the assert statement in the code. Matt's answer is provided for people sent from google that are interested in bit-twiddling hacks. – J.F. Sebastian Oct 11 '12 at 12:13

what you're looking for is called the Hamming Weight.

in python 2.6/3.0 it can be found rather easily with:

bits = sum( b == '1' for b in bin(x)[2:] )
share|improve this answer

What version of Python are you using? First off, Python uses white space not semicolon's, so to start it should look something like this...

  def bitsoncount(x): 
      b=0
      while(x > 0):
          x &= x - 1   
          b+=1
      return b
share|improve this answer
    
This code is wrong. bitsoncount(2) must be 1. Your code returns 2. – J.F. Sebastian Jan 2 '09 at 19:19
    
Thanks Sebastian. I didn't understand what the algorithm did, I was just trying to show the correct use of white space in Python, but it is fixed now. – Alex Jan 2 '09 at 19:44

The direct translation of your C algorithm is as follows:

def bitsoncount(x):
    b = 0
    while x > 0:
        x &= x - 1
        b += 1
    return b
share|improve this answer
    
I've simplified the code a bit; hope you don't mind. – J.F. Sebastian Jan 2 '09 at 18:50
    
Well -- now it's no longer a direct translation of his code -- I didn't go for simple =) – gnud Jan 2 '09 at 19:00

Maybe this is what you mean?

def bits_on_count(x):
    b = 0
    while x != 0:
        if x & 1: # Last bit is a 1
            b += 1
        x >>= 1 # Shift the bits of x right
    return b

There's also a way to do it simply in Python 3.0:

def bits_on_count(x):
  return sum(c=='1' for c in bin(x))

This uses the fact that bin(x) gives a binary representation of x.

share|improve this answer

Try this module:

import sys
if sys.maxint < 2**32:
    msb2= 2**30
else:
    msb2= 2**62
BITS=[-msb2*2] # not converted into long
while msb2:
    BITS.append(msb2)
    msb2 >>= 1

def bitcount(n):
    return sum(1 for b in BITS if b&n)

This should work for machine integers (depending on your OS and the Python version). It won't work for any long.

share|improve this answer

How do you like this one:

def bitsoncount(x):
    b   = 0
    bit = 1
    while bit <= x:
        b += int(x & bit > 0)
        bit = bit << 1

    return b

Basically, you use a test bit that starts right and gets shifted all the way through up to the bit length of your in parameter. For each position the bit & x yields a single bit which is on, or none. Check > 0 and turn the resulting True|False into 1|0 with int(), and add this to the accumulator. Seems to work nicely for longs :-) .

share|improve this answer

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