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What is a recommended way to overload the output stream operator? The following can not be done. It is expected that compilation will fail if the operator << is not defined for a type T.

template < class T >
inline std::ostream& operator << (std::ostream& os, const std::vector<T>& v) 
{
    os << "[";
    for (std::vector<T>::const_iterator ii = v.begin(); ii != v.end(); ++ii)
    {
        os << " " << *ii;
    }
    os << " ]";
    return os;
}

EDIT: It does compile, the problem was unrelated and was in the namespace. Thanks for assistance.

share|improve this question
    
Can you elaborate on the namespace problem and its solution? An overloaded function like this in the global namespace won't be found by ADL when the argument type is from std, and you can't put it in std. How did you solve it? –  Jeremy W. Murphy Sep 8 '13 at 8:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Did you actually try this code? It works fine on gcc with a small tweak std::vector<T>::const_iterator, needs to be declared as typename std::vector<T>::const_iterator

You may be better off with using std::copy and std::ostream_iterator.

EDIT: types, dependent types and typename Can't fit it all in the comments, so here goes (btw. this is my understanding and I could be off by a country mile - if so please correct me!)...

I think this is best explained with a simple example..

Let's assume you have a function foo

template <typename T>
void foo()
{
  T::bob * instofbob; // this is a dependent name (i.e. bob depends on T)
};

Looks okay, and typically you may do this

class SimpleClass
{
  typedef int bob;
};

And call

foo<SimpleClass>(); // now we know that foo::instofbob is "int"

Again, seems self explanatory, however some nuser comes along and does this

class IdiotClass
{
  static int bob;
};

Now

foo<IdiotClass>(); // oops, 

What you have now is an expression (multiplication) as IdiotClass::bob resolves to a non-type!

To the human, it's obvious that this is stupid, but the compiler has no way of differentiating between types vs. non-types, and by default in C++ (and I think this is where compilers differ), all qualified dependent names (i.e. T::bob) will be treated as non-type. To explicitly tell the compiler that the dependent name is a real type, you must specify the typename keyword -

template <typename T>
void foo()
{
  typedef typename T::bob *instofbob; // now compiler is happy, it knows to interpret "bob" as a type (and will complain otherwise!)
};

This applies even if it is a typedef. i.e.

template <typename T>
void foo()
{
  typedef typename T::bob local_bob;
};

Is that any clearer?

share|improve this answer
    
Why would std::copy be a better way of streaming out in case of a generic vector? With std::copy a dedicated long line should be written just to stream out a vector. However with output stream operator it is easier to do: std::cout << "Assignments = " << assignmentIds << std::endl;. I would like to print a vector always inside braces "[" + vector + "]", and that would require one more line with just "]" if std::copy is used. –  Leonid Nov 2 '10 at 13:34
    
It does compile without typename after solving the original problem. Is there any use of specifying typename in this context even if it does compile apart from slight risk of having a misinterpreted type? –  Leonid Nov 2 '10 at 13:44
    
@Leonid, yes that would be great that someones explain the concept of dependent name. –  Stephane Rolland Nov 2 '10 at 14:00
    
@Leonid, in the case of the trivial vector example above, agreed the std::copy operation appears to be verbose, but consider now that you decide to change the formatting, and you want it to be separated by a ',' in some instances and by a ' ' in others, how would you have that with a single global operator<<? Now let's imagine that someone else is re-using your code, and wants to do something different? I'd be very wary of such global operators... –  Nim Nov 2 '10 at 14:08
    
@Leonid, as to your second point, if your compiler is happy and you're happy that you're never going to have to re-compile your code in another compiler then I wouldn't bother; but for the sake of one key word "typename", if you are ever in the position of moving between compilers, you can save yourself some headache trying to understand the rather verbose compiler error messages you get as a result of leaving it out! It's your call... –  Nim Nov 2 '10 at 14:13

This is what you want:

template < class T >
std::ostream& operator << (std::ostream& os, const std::vector<T>& v) 
{
    os << "[";
    for (typename std::vector<T>::const_iterator ii = v.begin(); ii != v.end(); ++ii)
    {
        os << " " << *ii;
    }
    os << "]";
    return os;
}

You forgot the std:: on the first ostream

You put an extra space after [ in os << "[".

and you need typename before std::vector<T>::const_iterator

share|improve this answer
template<typename T> ostream &operator<<(ostream &s,vector<T> t) { 
  s<<"["; 
  for(unsigned int i = 0; i < t.size(); i++)
    s<<t[i]<<(i==t.size()-1?"":",");
  return s<<"]"<<endl; 
}
share|improve this answer
    
can someone tell me, why I cannot <pre><code> tag this piece of code ? –  smartnut007 Nov 2 '10 at 12:39
    
because SO uses a modified version of "markdown". Indent by 4 spaces for formatted code. –  Steve Jessop Nov 2 '10 at 12:46
1  
warning: signed in compared to unsigned int :( –  Inverse Nov 2 '10 at 14:37

this compile for me on visual studio 2003. surely youshould use the keyword typename before the const std::vector<T> and I don't think the inline keyword has sense, IMHO templates are really close to inlining.

#include <ostream>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

template < class T >
std::ostream& operator << (std::ostream& os, typename const std::vector<T>& v) 
{
    os << "[ ";
    for (typename std::vector<T>::const_iterator ii = v.begin(); ii != v.end(); ++ii)
    {
        os << " " << *ii;
    }
    os << "]";
    return os;
}

void Test()
{
    std::vector<int> vect;
    vect.push_back(5);
    std::cerr << vect;
}

Edit: I have added a typename also before the std::vector<T>::const_iterator as Nim suggested

share|improve this answer
1  
Inlining is orthogonal to templatizing. –  sbi Nov 2 '10 at 12:39
2  
@Konrad inline is not required for templates. The ODR allows to omit it. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 2 '10 at 23:20
1  
@Konrad the C++ Standard says "The keyword typename shall be applied only to qualified names, but those names need not be dependent.". C++03 in addition enforces "The keyword typename shall only be used in template declarations and definitions", but C++0x is going to remove that. That all said, std::vector<T> definitely is a dependent name. Still you don't need typename here, because the compiler can lookup std::vector at parse time and see that it is a class template (and thus know that std::vector<T> is a type). –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 2 '10 at 23:24
1  
What he actually wanted to write is const typename ... or typename ... const instead of typename const ... though, the last of which is syntactically illegal. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 2 '10 at 23:50
1  
@Konrad vector<T> isn't qualified, but std::vector<T> is. For the inline thing, see 3.2 the bullet list at the very end (I don't have the standard here currently), mentioning among other things classes inline functions and also function/class templates. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 3 '10 at 11:53

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