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I'm having this problem with my AJAX, where it's not working in IE, but it is working in FF. I got a majority of the following code off the w3schools website, so I don't see why it would be wrong. Can anyone help me out?

<script type="text/javascript">
    function checkRefresh(str)
    {
        if (str=="") {
            document.getElementById("lastCallID").innerHTML="";
            return;
        }

        if (window.XMLHttpRequest) {
            // code for IE7+, Firefox, Chrome, Opera, Safari
            xmlhttp=new XMLHttpRequest();
        } else {
            // code for IE6, IE5
            xmlhttp=new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
        }

        xmlhttp.onreadystatechange = function() {
            if (xmlhttp.readyState==4 && xmlhttp.status==200) {
                if (document.getElementById("lastCallID").innerHTML < xmlhttp.responseText) {
                    GoPopUp();  
                } else {
                    setTimeout('checkRefresh()',15000)
                }
            }
        }
        xmlhttp.open("GET","getnewid.php",true);
        xmlhttp.send();
    }
</script>

THANKS!

EDIT: As far as I can tell, it's not working in IE6 -8. Basically what the idea is, is that the ajax calls a script which runs a php page which gets the most recent ID in a database. Then it compares the ID from the php page, to the ID on the main page. If the ID from the Ajax request is greater than what is on the page, then it starts a function which starts a jquery popup to alert the user that there is a new database entry and gives them the option to refresh. in IE 6,7,8 That popup never starts, so I can only imagine that the ajax is not working correctly to grab the new ID. The refresh function works when I call it, that's why I think it's the ajax that's the issue. But in case you're curious, here is the GoPopUp function

var GoPopUp = function(){
            $('#PopNewCall').fadeIn('slow');
            PageRefreshTimer();

        }

        //Function which refreshes page after a certain number of seconds with no user Inputs
        var PageRefreshTimer = function(){
            setTimeout("location.reload(true);",30000); //1,000 = 1 second
        }

        //Function which refreshes page after user has clicked refresh
        var RefreshNow = function(){
            setTimeout("location.reload(true);",0);
        }
share|improve this question
3  
what exactly is it doing/not doing? anyway you can elaborate on the details... –  adam Nov 2 '10 at 14:34
    
And which version(s) if IE is it not working in? –  Paul D. Waite Nov 2 '10 at 14:35
    
"I got a majority of the following code off the w3schools website, so I don't see why it would be wrong" - people should seriously promotejs.com instead of crappy w3schools –  galambalazs Nov 2 '10 at 14:36
    
It'd be useful for you to provide a vague idea of where the code is failing as well. –  Derek Adair Nov 2 '10 at 14:39
    
As far as I can tell, it's not working in IE6 -8. Basically what the idea is, is that the ajax calls a script which runs a php page which gets the most recent ID in a database. Then it compares the ID from the php page, to the ID on the main page. If the ID from the Ajax request is greater than what is on the page, then it starts a function to refresh the page. in IE 6,7,8 It doesn't refresh the page, so I can only imagine that the ajax is not working correctly to grab the new ID. The refresh function works when i call it, that's why I think it's the ajax that's the issue –  Bill Nov 2 '10 at 14:41

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

For a simple cross-browser solution, I would suggest using jQuery.
jQuery AJAX API can be found at http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.ajax/

share|improve this answer

Here's a function I like to use for getting an XMLHttpRequest object cross browser.

function getRequestObject() {
    var options = [
        function () { return new XMLHttpRequest() },
        function () { return new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP") },
        function () { return new ActiveXObject("Msxml2.XMLHTTP.6.0") }
    ];

    for (var i = 0, il = options.length; i < il; i++) {
        try { return options[i]() } catch(e) {}
    }
}

var xhr = getRequestObject();
if (!xhr) { return; } // :(

// use xhr here
xhr.open("GET", "/foo/bar");
share|improve this answer
    
Not really sure that's making sense to me... where would I put the if statement: if (document.getElementById("lastCallID").innerHTML < xmlhttp.responseText) { GoPopUp(); } else { setTimeout('checkRefresh()',15000) } –  Bill Nov 2 '10 at 14:35
    
Well your question was kind of vague so this was the only answer I could think of. My code gives you an XMLHTTPRequest object in IE5.5+. That's all. –  August Lilleaas Nov 2 '10 at 15:22

i don't see the failure in your code, but: is there any reason to not use one of the great, existing frameworks like twobirds, jquery, mootools or prototypejs to do ajax-stuff? if you try to write this on your own, supporting all browsers (or at least the big ones) you'll get to hell and spend a lot of time (time that you could use to develop or refine other things)

EDIT: as answer to your comment: i don't know what exactrly you're trying to do, but it looks like you're periodically repfeshing 'getnewid.php' to 'lastCallID'. it would be like this (don't know what 'GoPopUp()' is for, just calling it after every update in this case):

var refreshInterval = setInterval(function() {
     $('#lastCallID').load('getnewid.php', function(){ GoPopUp(); });
}, 15000);
share|improve this answer
    
There is no particular reason as to why I'm not using jquery. If I use a framework, jquery would be the one because I'm already using that in another part of the site. The main reason I didn't use jquery was because I found the tutorial on w3schools for the ajax and I assumed it would work haha... How would I transform what I have to jquery? –  Bill Nov 2 '10 at 14:37
    
@Phil: please see my edit, i don't undertand what exactly you're trying to do. –  oezi Nov 2 '10 at 14:47
    
.. I added a little background about what I'm trying to do above (under my quetsion) the Ajax is calling getnewid.php which runs a script to get the new ID from a database (which is updated periodically) it then compares the ID it got last with the one that's loaded in the page. If the last ID is > than one in the page it means there is a new entry. GoPopUp is then called which creates a small jquery popup to tell the user there is a new entry in the database and gives the option to refresh the page. –  Bill Nov 2 '10 at 14:50

Edit: Sorry, I would of posted this as a comment to Catie's reply, but as a new user I do not have sufficient 'reputation' points. Despite that, I'm sure most will agree with the validity of my comment.


@catie, As developers we all have our issues with IE, but it would seem odd for a teacher to instruct students "not to bother with IE" as this would do little to prepare you for the real world.

The reality is IE is not going away anytime soon and between versions 6/7/8 they still have over 50% of the market share globally. As a best practice it is always better to ensure your site/code works in all browsers as expected, much like @august solution / suggestion.

share|improve this answer
1  
Hi Betard. This sort of thing is better as a comment. –  Paul D. Waite Nov 2 '10 at 15:37
    
I fully agree. I'm new to stackoverflow and it seems I can only comment on my own post. Unless I am missing something, it doesn't look like I have the ability to comment on others. –  Betard Fooser Nov 4 '10 at 12:52

Do you have to submit your assignment on IE? Our teacher (when I took the relevant similar course) asked us to not bother with IE as a lot of things don't work on it. Try refreshing your browser or something.

share|improve this answer
1  
Yes, it does need to work in IE.... I'm not so concrened with IE 6, but definitely IE 7 and 8 as they are still a decent part of the market, and the ajax creates some core functionality of the page –  Bill Nov 2 '10 at 14:33
8  
Thing is, outside of classroom assignments, sometimes people want things to work in IE. It’s quite popular. –  Paul D. Waite Nov 2 '10 at 14:34

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