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I have two files:

file 1

dsf
sdfsd
dsfsdf

file 2

ljljlj 
lkklk 
dsf
sdfsd
dsfsdf

I want to display what is in file 2 but not in file 1, so file 3 should look like

ljljlj 
lkklk 
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10 Answers 10

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You can try

grep -f file1 file2

or

grep -v -f file1 file2
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4  
This won't work. Try adding dsfblah to file2. –  dogbane Nov 2 '10 at 15:22
2  
You can fix it with grep -F -x –  tripleee May 30 '13 at 14:50
grep -Fxvf file1 file2

What the flags mean:

-F, --fixed-strings
              Interpret PATTERN as a list of fixed strings, separated by newlines, any of which is to be matched.    
-x, --line-regexp
              Select only those matches that exactly match the whole line.
-v, --invert-match
              Invert the sense of matching, to select non-matching lines.
-f FILE, --file=FILE
              Obtain patterns from FILE, one per line.  The empty file contains zero patterns, and therefore matches nothing.
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Option -n could be added to number the differing lines –  Maciej Jończyk Nov 27 '14 at 12:59

You can use the comm command to compare two sorted files

comm -13 <(sort file1) <(sort file2)
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FYI, it is actually comm -1 -3 file1 file2. The two flags 1 and 3 are merged into one. –  cevaris Feb 19 at 20:30

if you are expecting them in a certain order, you can just use diff

diff file1 file2 | grep ">"

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join -v 2 <(sort file1) <(sort file2)
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I successfully used

diff "${file1}" "${file2}" | grep "<" | sed 's/^<//g'  > "${diff_file}"

outputting the difference to a file

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an awk answer:

awk 'NR == FNR {file1[$0]++; next} !($0 in file1)' file1 file2

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A tried a slight variation on Luca's answer and it worked for me.

diff file1 file2 | grep ">" | sed 's/^> //g' > diff_file

Note that the searched pattern in sed is a > followed by a space.

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If you want to use loops You can try like this: (diff and cmp are much more efficient. )

while read line
do
    flag = 0
    while read line2
    do
       if ( "$line" = "$line2" )
        then
            flag = 1
        fi
     done < file1 
     if ( flag -eq 0 )
     then
         echo $line > file3
     fi
done < file2

Note: The program is only to provide a basic insight into what can be done if u dont want to use system calls such as diff n comm..

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file1 
m1
m2
m3

file2 
m2
m4
m5

>awk 'NR == FNR {file1[$0]++; next} !($0 in file1)' file1 file2
m4
m5

>awk 'NR == FNR {file1[$0]++; next} ($0 in file1)' file1 file2
m2

> What's awk command to get 'm1 and m3' ??  as in file1 and not in file2? 
m1
m3
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