Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am a bit new to templates in C++ so forgive me if this question is confusing or stupid, I just have a problem where I want to implement a clone smart pointer so I don't have to create copy constructors for each and every class that uses my underlying XML library that only seems to use object pointers and not smart pointers. The problem is that my traits need to create the new objects using functions from the underlying library and I do not know how I would go about doing that in a template/traits class. I have posted all the code with some comments below, if anybody could advice, I'd appreciate it.

If something is unclear, please ask and I will try to clarify.

#ifndef CLONE_PTR_H
#define CLONE_PTR_H

#include <algorithm>
#include <functional>
#include <xercesc/dom/DOM.hpp>
#include <xercesc/dom/DOMDocument.hpp>

struct DOMObject_cloner
{
    static DOMDocument* clone(DOMDocument* pPtr)
    {
        DOMImplementation* impl = DOMImplementationRegistry::getDOMImplementation(X("Core"));  // this looks wrong, depends on DOMIMplementation_cloner being done really... how do I do this properly
        return pPtr ?  : impl->createDocument(...) //I need this function for a DOMDocument* to be created!!!
    }
};

struct DOMImplementation_cloner
{
    static DOMImplementation* clone(DOMImplementation* pPtr)
    {
        return pPtr ? DOMImplementationRegistry::getDOMImplementation(X("Core")) : 0;
    }
};

template<typename T>
struct default_clone
{
    static T* clone(T* pPtr)
    {
        return pPtr ? pPtr->clone() : 0;
    }
};


template <typename T, typename Cloner = default_clone<T> >
    class clone_ptr
    {
    public:
        // types
        typedef T element_type;

        typedef element_type value_type;
        typedef const element_type const_value_type;
        typedef value_type* pointer;
        typedef const_value_type* const_pointer;
        typedef value_type& reference;
        typedef const_value_type& const_reference;

        // creation
        clone_ptr() :
        mPtr(0)
        {}

        explicit clone_ptr(pointer pPtr) :
        mPtr(pPtr)
        {}


        clone_ptr(const clone_ptr& pOther) :
        mPtr(pOther.get() ? Cloner()(pOther.get()) : 0)
        {}

      /*clone_ptr(const clone_ptr& pOther) :
        mPtr(pOther.get() ? pOther->clone() : 0),
        {}*/


        clone_ptr& operator=(clone_ptr pOther)
        {
            swap(*this, pOther);

            return *this;
        }

        ~clone_ptr()
        {
            delete get();
        }

        // observers
        pointer get() const
        {
            return mPtr;
        }

        pointer operator->() const
        {
            return get();
        }

        reference operator*() const
        {
            assert(get() != 0);
            return *get();
        }

        // modifiers
        pointer release()
        {
            pointer result = mPtr;
            mPtr = 0;

            return result;
        }

        void reset(pointer pPtr = 0)
        {
            *this = clone_ptr(pPtr);
        }

        // utility
        friend void swap(clone_ptr& pFirst, clone_ptr& pSecond)
        {
            std::swap(pFirst.mPtr, pSecond.mPtr);
        }

    private:
        pointer mPtr;
        //default_clone Cloner;
    };

    template <typename T1>
    bool operator!(const clone_ptr<T1>& pX)
    {
        return pX.get() == 0;
    };

    template <typename T1, typename T2>
    bool operator>=(const clone_ptr<T1>& pFirst, const clone_ptr<T2>& pSecond)
    {
        return !(pFirst < pSecond);
    };

    // compare
    template <typename T1, typename T2>
    bool operator==(const clone_ptr<T1>& pFirst, const clone_ptr<T2>& pSecond)
    {
        return pFirst.get() == pSecond.get();
    };

    template <typename T1, typename T2>
    bool operator!=(const clone_ptr<T1>& pFirst, const clone_ptr<T2>& pSecond)
    {
        return !(pFirst == pSecond);
    };

    template <typename T1, typename T2>
    bool operator<(const clone_ptr<T1>& pFirst, const clone_ptr<T2>& pSecond)
    {
        return std::less<void*>()(pFirst.get(), pSecond.get());
    };

    template <typename T1, typename T2>
    bool operator<=(const clone_ptr<T1>& pFirst, const clone_ptr<T2>& pSecond)
    {
        return !(pFirst > pSecond);
    };

    template <typename T1, typename T2>
    bool operator>(const clone_ptr<T1>& pFirst, const clone_ptr<T2>& pSecond)
    {
        return pSecond < pFirst;
    };

#endif
share|improve this question
1  
Tony, may I suggest you to remove the unnecessary code (such as dereferencing operators, etc.) to keep only the relevant part. And to provide a use case / example to clarify. Thanks. –  Julien-L Nov 2 '10 at 15:58
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I am not really sure if I understand your question, but I see one thing wrong with your code. DOMObject_cloner and DOMImplementation_cloner should be specializations of default_clone, like this:

template<>
struct default_clone<DOMDocument> {
    static DOMDocument* clone(DOMDocument* pPtr)
    {
        DOMImplementation* impl = DOMImplementationRegistry::getDOMImplementation(X("Core"));
        return pPtr ?  : impl->createDocument(...);
    }
};

Template specialization is the whole point of traits in C++.

share|improve this answer
    
This is usefull, if only you could tell me if creating a copy of this by calling createDocument again is correct for a template specialization? –  Tony The Lion Nov 3 '10 at 9:10
    
This depends on the library you are using, so you may want to make this a separate question. I do not know the answer here. –  Björn Pollex Nov 3 '10 at 9:12
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.