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I've read this article several times:

http://jonasboner.com/2008/10/06/real-world-scala-dependency-injection-di.html

I think that I get it. However there's something that I'm not quite getting.

Looking at his UserService example, I see that he's set up UserRepositoryComponent to encapsulate UserRepository. But what I don't understand is why UserRepositoryComponent plays two roles: it encapsulates UserRepository and also offers a reference to a UserRepository object.

I'm trying to imagine how I would use this pattern if I wanted to create a service that depends on two UserRepository instances. Maybe the job of the new service is to copy users from a "source" UserRepository to a "destination" UserRepository. So I'm imagining something like this:

trait CopyUserServiceComponent {
  val source: UserRepositoryComponent
  val destination: UserRepositoryComponent
  class CopyUserServiceComponent { 
    ... 
  }
}

But this is different from the original pattern. In this case I'm defining the dependencies in the component itself instead of inheriting them from some other component. But this seems to me to be the right way to do it: the components should declare their dependencies, not instances of their included services.

What am I missing here?

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1  
Actually I think that "source" and "destination" should be of type UserRepository, not UserRepositoryComponent... but in order for them to do that, they'd need to bring UserRepository into scope by inheriting in some way from UserRepositoryComponent... and then CopyUserServiceComponent would wind up with an extraneous UserRepository that it got from UserRepositoryComponent. –  Willis Blackburn Nov 2 '10 at 15:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In this case I'm defining the dependencies in the component itself instead of inheriting them from some other component.

The cake pattern doesn't use inheritance to declare dependencies. Did you see any "extend" in UserServiceComponent?

But this seems to me to be the right way to do it: the components should declare their dependencies, not instances of their included services.

But that's exactly what the cake pattern does: declare dependencies! Perhaps if the example contained def userRepositoryFactory = new UserRepository instead of val userRepository = new UserRepository, that would have been more clear?

So, let's go back to your example:

trait CopyUserServiceComponent {
  val source: UserRepositoryComponent
  val destination: UserRepositoryComponent
  class CopyUserServiceComponent { 
    ... 
  }
}

Let's see the things we can't do with that:

trait CopyUserServiceComponent {
  // The module will need to see my internals!
  private val source: UserRepositoryComponent
  private val destination: UserRepositoryComponent
  class CopyUserServiceComponent { 
    ... 
  }
}

trait CopyBigUserServiceComponent extends CopyServiceComponent {
  // Any change in implementation will have to be reflected in the module!
  val tmp: UserRepositoryComponent
  ...
}

On the other hand...

trait UserRepositoryComponent {
  val userRepositoryFactory: () => UserRepository

  class UserRepository {
    ...
  }
} 

trait CopyUserServiceComponent {
  self: UserRepositoryComponent =>
  // No problem here
  private val source: UserRepository = userRepositoryFactory()
  private val destination: UserRepository = userRepositoryFactory()
  class CopyUserServiceComponent { 
    ... 
  }
}

trait CopyBigUserServiceComponent extends CopyServiceComponent {
  self: UserRepositoryComponent =>
  // No problem here either
  val tmp: : UserRepository = userRepositoryFactory()
  ...
}

EDIT

Complementating the answer, let's consider two different needs:

  • I need many instances of UserRepository.

In this case, you are applying the pattern at the wrong level. In Jonas' example, UserRepository is at the level of a factory-providing singleton.

So, in that case, you wouldn't do UserRepository and UserRepositoryComponent but, say, UserRepositoryFactory and UserRepositoryFactoryComponent.

  • I need precisely two singleton UserRepository.

In this case, just do something like this:

trait UserRepositoryComponent {
  val sourceUserService: UserService
  val destinationUserService: UserService

  class UserService ...
}
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The service uses inheritance to declare its dependencies in that it requires that "this" or "self" conform to some interface other than its own. The service itself doesn't inherit, but it can only be used within some other component that does. –  Willis Blackburn Nov 2 '10 at 22:29
    
Anyway what bugs me about this pattern is that (getting back to Jonas's example) UserServiceComponent declares a "val userService: UserService." So by inheriting from UserServiceComponent (see previous comment...) I get a dependency on UserService. But it's on a single UserService. If I need two different ones, then what? I can't inherit twice. –  Willis Blackburn Nov 2 '10 at 22:31
    
@Willis I'll complement my answer to discuss these points. –  Daniel C. Sobral Nov 3 '10 at 12:15
    
Changing that afterwards is ugly, but if think you might need more instances later, you could just have val userServices:List[UserService]. However going from one to many UserServices is a big structural change, and such things wouldn't work for other strategies without refactoring neither. –  Landei Nov 3 '10 at 12:21
    
I think that this is becoming clearer for me. Thanks for all of your explanations. In the case of needing two UserRepository objects, think that what I'd really need is another component representing the two UserRepositories in combination--a SourceDestUserRepositoryComponent or something like that. –  Willis Blackburn Nov 4 '10 at 11:26

I assume, Jonas in his article refers to a widely accepted methodology of building scalable applications called Composite Software Construction that in a few words can be explained as follows: entire application (orchestrated on a meta-level) is an assembly built of independend components, which in their turn are compositions of other components and services. In terms of composite software, 'cake' (ComponentRegistry object in the example) is an assembly of components ('UserServiceComponent' and 'UserRepositoryComponent') etc. Whilst in the example components enclose service implementations it can hardly happen in the real-world.

In your example you don't need to define an inner class - you can put your workflow in an ordinary method:

trait CopyUserServiceComponent {
  val source: UserRepositoryComponent
  val destination: UserRepositoryComponent

  def copy = {...}
}

It perfectly conforms to original pattern - essential feature of the cake is not [only] specifying dependencies via self-type annotations, but also ability to abstract from the concrete implementation, till the moment when you need to build an assembly from the components.

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