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i am trying to create a module which is like this

package MyModule;

use strict;
use Exporter;
use vars qw($VERSION @ISA @EXPORT @EXPORT_OK %EXPORT_TAGS);

$VERSION = 1.00;
@ISA = qw(Exporter);
@EXPORT = qw(func1);

sub func1 {    
    my x = shift;    
    print x;    
    func2();    
}

sub func2 {    
    print x;    
}

and from a perl script, i am calling func1 of the module and passing a variable x. how do i make that variable visible to both subroutines or say all the functions inside that module. Please help.

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Declare $x in the scope of the file using my or our:

my $x;

# subroutines definition

File has the largest lexical scope, so the variable will be visible for the rest of code (unless you re-declare it in some inner scope using my).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it worked – alp Nov 2 '10 at 15:35
    
our is a somewhat funny thing, insofar is it is actually a lexical alias to a global variable. – tchrist Nov 2 '10 at 19:00

Make $x lexical to the package file rather than a single subroutine:

package MyModule;

use strict;
use Exporter;
use vars qw($VERSION @ISA @EXPORT @EXPORT_OK %EXPORT_TAGS);

$VERSION = 1.00;
@ISA = qw(Exporter);
@EXPORT = qw(func1);

my $x;

sub func1 {

    $x = shift;
    print $x;

    func2();
}

sub func2 {

    print $x;
}

But this example doesn't really make sense. A more sensible example would be to define a lexical filehandle that multiple subroutines within the package print to:

package PoorManLogger;

my $fileHandle;

sub initialize { open $fileHandle, '<', +shift }

sub alert { print $fileHandle 'ALERT: ', @_, "\n"; }

sub debug { print $fileHandle 'DEBUG: ', @_, "\n"; }

sub close { close $fileHandle; }  # Though this isn't technically needed.

1;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it worked. – alp Nov 2 '10 at 15:34
2  
Lexicals have file and block scope. They aren't related to packages. – eugene y Nov 2 '10 at 16:09
    
It’s more correct to say that lexicals have scope — which is a concept unrelated to packages — and that a scope is a file, a block, or an eval string. Another way to think of it is to equate scopes and blocks, but then you have to put imaginary curlies around files and eval strings. – tchrist Nov 2 '10 at 18:57

see our

(comments to my suggestion are correct, my suggestion wasn't)

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1  
That creates a variable that is visible outside the current file scope, which is more than what the OP asked for. – Ether Nov 2 '10 at 18:05
1  
One could quibble over whether our actually creates a variable, rather than merely granting a view into the package. But I fear that would turn into some sort of deep ontological inquiry. ☹ – tchrist Nov 2 '10 at 19:25

One of the main benefits of OO is encapsulation:

#!/usr/bin/perl

package MyModule;

use strict; use warnings;

sub new {
    my $class = shift;
    bless { x => shift } => $class;
}

sub x {
    my $self = shift;
    $self->{x} = shift if @_;
    return $self->{x};
}

sub func2 {
    my $self = shift;
    print $self->x, "\n";
}

package main;

use strict; use warnings;

my $m = MyModule->new(5);

$m->func2;

$m->x(7);

$m->func2;
share|improve this answer
    
I just love how the same sub is a getter and setter... – Zaid Nov 2 '10 at 17:36
    
wouldn't if (@_) { work better than the defined test, catching the case of legitimately assigning undef to x – Eric Strom Nov 2 '10 at 17:45
    
@Eric Of course. It's been a long time since I last wrote accessors. – Sinan Ünür Nov 2 '10 at 17:59
    
Moose has spoiled you :) – Eric Strom Nov 2 '10 at 18:12
    
Well, it’s an advantage if you want each object to have independent state. It’s a disadvantage if it complicates the code. Using either file-scoped lexicals or regular old package variables is more straightforward, and it does a reasonable job at providing class variables aka static data members. If you wind up making a private scope for common shared state between several functions, this can suffer from the straightforwardness troubles, since order of initialization can become a problem requiring an out-of-order execution block like BEGIN{} or INIT{} to solve. – tchrist Nov 2 '10 at 19:05

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