Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was writing a little test program to try out some things with Remote Actors that I was going to need in a Scala project.

The basic goal was to write a test application of one server that could handle a bunch of clients and more important clients that can send multiple messages at the same time (like pings, requests for updates and user induced requests for data)

What I came up with was this: brief overview: the client starts 3 different actors which again start actors in while loops with different offsets in order to simulate rather random messages.

import scala.actors.remote.RemoteActor
import scala.actors.remote.Node
import scala.actors.Actor

trait Request
trait Response

case object WhoAmI extends Request
case class YouAre(s:String) extends Response

case object Ping extends Request
case object Pong extends Response

case class PrintThis(s:String) extends Request
case object PrintingDone extends Response

object Server {
  def main(args: Array[String]) {
    val server = new Server
    server.start
  }
}

class Server extends Actor {
  RemoteActor.alive(12345)
  RemoteActor.register('server, this)
  var count:Int = 0

  def act() {
    while(true) {
      receive {
        case WhoAmI => {
          count += 1
          sender ! YouAre(count.toString)
        }
        case Ping => sender ! Pong
        case PrintThis(s) => {
          println(s)
          sender ! PrintingDone
        }
        case x => println("Got a bad request: " + x)

      }
    }
  }
}

object Act3 extends scala.actors.Actor {
  def act = {
    var i = 0
    Thread.sleep(900)
    while (i <= 12) {
      i += 1
      val a = new Printer
      a.start
      Thread.sleep(900)
    }
  }
}

class Printer extends scala.actors.Actor {
  def act = {
    val server = RemoteActor.select(Node("localhost",12345), 'server)
    server ! PrintThis("gagagagagagagagagagagagaga")
    receive {
      case PrintingDone => println("yeah I printed")
      case _            => println("got something bad from printing")
    }
  }
}

object Act2 extends scala.actors.Actor {
  def act = {
    var i = 0

    while (i < 10) {
      i+=1
      val a = new Pinger
      a.start
      Thread.sleep(700)
    }
  }
}

class Pinger extends scala.actors.Actor {
  def act = {
    val server = RemoteActor.select(Node("localhost",12345), 'server)
    server ! Ping
    receive {
      case Pong => println("so I pinged and it fits")
      case x    => println("something wrong with ping. Got " + x)
    }
  }
}

object Act extends scala.actors.Actor {
  def act = {
    var i = 0

    while(i < 10) {
      i+=1
      val a = new SayHi
      a.start()
      Thread.sleep(200)
    }

  }
}

class SayHi extends scala.actors.Actor {
  def act = {
    val server = RemoteActor.select(Node("localhost",12345), 'server)
    server ! "Hey!"
  }
}

object Client {
  def main(args: Array[String]) {
    Act.start()
    //Act2.start()
    Act3.start()
  }
}

The problem is that things don't run as smoothly as I'd expect them to: when I start only one of the client actors (by commenting the others out as I did with Act2in Client) things usually but not always go well. If I start two or more actors, quite often the printouts appear in bulk (meaning: there's nothing happening at once and then the printouts appear rather fast). Also the client sometimes terminates and sometimes doesn't.

This may not be the biggest problems but they're enough to make me feel quite uncomfortable. I did a lot of reading on Actors and Remote Actors but I find the available info rather lacking.

Tried to add exit statements where ever it seemed fit. But that didn't help.

Has anybody got an idea what I'm doing wrong? Any general tricks here? Some dos and donts?

share|improve this question
    
Related artima.com/shop/actors_in_scala (but might not fix your problem) –  oluies Nov 3 '10 at 13:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

My guess is that your issues stem from blocking your actor's threads by using receive and Thread.sleep. Blocking operations consume threads in the actors' thread pool, which can prevent other actors from executing until new threads are added to the pool. This question may provide some additional insight.

You can use loop, loopWhile, react, and reactWithin to rewrite many of your actors to use non-blocking operations. For example

import scala.actors.TIMEOUT

object Act extends scala.actors.Actor {
   def act = {
      var i = 0
      loopWhile(i < 10) {
         reactWithin(200) { case TIMEOUT =>
            i+=1
            val a = new SayHi
            a.start()
         }
      }
   }
}

Of course, you can eliminate some boilerplate by writing your own control construct:

def doWithin(msec: Long)(f: => Unit) = reactWithin(msec) { case TIMEOUT => f }
def repeat(times: Int)(f: => Unit) = {
   var i = 0
   loopWhile(i < times) {
      f
      i+=1
   }
}

This would allow you to write

repeat(10) {
   doWithin(200) {
      (new SayHi).start
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
hi Aaron. Thanks for the code, the link and all suggestions. I'm aware of reactWithin but let I point out again, that I used to the Thread.sleep to produce an offset between the messages. So that's something else. Anyway I kicked out all sleep commands. Should have thought about that one myself. Now it's more of a stress test ;) but that didn't really solve the problem: I experimented with react vs receive and with the usage of explicit exit. Got the best results with react and no exit but still in about 1 out of 10 runs the client program does not terminate :( –  Agl Nov 3 '10 at 7:40
    
Note that the code as written in my response will produce an offset between the messages. Since the actor receives no messages, it will always timeout and then execute the timout case. This should resolve the problem with the printouts occurring in bulk. –  Aaron Novstrup Nov 3 '10 at 16:12
    
As for the termination issue, I've observed the same thing with Scala actors and never had the time to figure out what was going on. –  Aaron Novstrup Nov 3 '10 at 16:14
    
It may be that your Printer actor is waiting interminably for a response that never comes. If that's the case, replacing receive with a receiveWithin will help. Of course, then there's the question of why the response never comes... –  Aaron Novstrup Nov 3 '10 at 16:46

You may try Akka actors framework instead http://akkasource.org/

share|improve this answer
1  
Instead of getting into details and figuring out what's happening? :) –  Vasil Remeniuk Nov 2 '10 at 20:24
    
I'm afraid I agree with Vasil :) On the other other hand: is there any advantage over Scalas Actors? The documentation's looking good which is a big Plus in my Book. –  Agl Nov 2 '10 at 22:17
    
@Agl This thread might help: groups.google.com/group/akka-user/browse_thread/thread/… –  Aaron Novstrup Nov 2 '10 at 23:00
2  
Disclaimer: I am involved in Akka. The only thing I'm aware of that Scala Actors does better than Akka is that it allows nesting receives and reacts, which come at a price of potential memory leaks and increasing mailbox scan times. On the other hand Akka offers robust remoting, a ton of integrations with basically all major NoSQL stores, Apache Camel, JAX-RS (Jersey), Comet (Atmosphere), Remote supervision etc etc etc. And also, as you correctly noted, we are very proud of our documentation. –  Viktor Klang Nov 3 '10 at 8:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.