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I grabbed a database of the zip codes and their langitudes/latitudes, etc from this This page. It has got the following fields:

ZIP, LATITUDE, LONGITUDE, CITY, STATE, COUNTY, ZIP_CLASS

The data was in a text file but I inserted it into a MySQL table. My question now is, how can i utilise the fields above to calculate the distance between two zip codes that a user can enter on the website? Working code in PHP will be appreciated

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5  
What is "distance"? Do you want distance "as the crow flies" / great-circle distance? Road distance? Actual 3D distance between the two points in space? –  ShreevatsaR Jan 2 '09 at 21:43
    
Good question, Preferably I'd want miles –  Click Upvote Jan 2 '09 at 23:05
3  
@Shreevats: Since he is asking for a calculation using lat/long, it's safe to assume that you're not going to get road distance. Actual distance between two points in space (e.g. through the earth's body) is probably also not useful. Therefore, "as the crow flies"/great circle is most likely. –  Adam Bellaire Jan 3 '09 at 0:35

9 Answers 9

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can also try hitting a web service to calc the distance. Let someone else do the heavy lifting.

http://www.codebump.com/services/PlaceLookup.asmx

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3  
that would work for 2 zipcodes, but imagine trying to select the top 100 closest locations to a given zipcode, from thousands of records in the database :) –  aryaxt Sep 29 '10 at 4:58

This is mike's answer with some annotations for the magic numbers. It seemed to work fine for me for some test data:

function calc_distance($point1, $point2)
{
    $radius      = 3958;      // Earth's radius (miles)
    $deg_per_rad = 57.29578;  // Number of degrees/radian (for conversion)

    $distance = ($radius * pi() * sqrt(
                ($point1['lat'] - $point2['lat'])
                * ($point1['lat'] - $point2['lat'])
                + cos($point1['lat'] / $deg_per_rad)  // Convert these to
                * cos($point2['lat'] / $deg_per_rad)  // radians for cos()
                * ($point1['long'] - $point2['long'])
                * ($point1['long'] - $point2['long'])
        ) / 180);

    return $distance;  // Returned using the units used for $radius.
}
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It can be done with just maths...

function calc_distance($point1, $point2)
{
    $distance = (3958 * 3.1415926 * sqrt(
    		($point1['lat'] - $point2['lat'])
    		* ($point1['lat'] - $point2['lat'])
    		+ cos($point1['lat'] / 57.29578)
    		* cos($point2['lat'] / 57.29578)
    		* ($point1['long'] - $point2['long'])
    		* ($point1['long'] - $point2['long'])
    	) / 180);

    return $distance;
}
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2  
Can you give a reference to where you took this calculation from? –  Eran Galperin Jan 2 '09 at 21:00
2  
Too many magic numbers, and far too much indentation to the right! –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 2 '09 at 21:03
    
What unit is this returning the distance in? For a zip code which should give 10 miles, it gave something like 7892.xx (approx). How can this be converted to miles? –  Click Upvote Jan 2 '09 at 21:11
1  
And shouldn't pi be 3.1415927 (with a 7 at the end, not a 6, since the next digit is 5? Or have I misremembered that...) –  Ben Jan 2 '09 at 21:55
1  
3958 is probably the mean radius: 3963 is the equatorial radius. Using a more accurate mean radius is probably meaningless given that the USA is not actually isometric to a subset of the surface of a sphere: what you'd want is a more accurate mean taken over the USA. Or use the GPS spheroid. –  Steve Jessop Jan 3 '09 at 1:19

Check out the Haversine formula for calculating great circle distances between two points. Some more samples can be found here

Haversine formula:

  • R = earth’s radius (mean radius = 6,371km)
  • Δlat = lat2− lat1
  • Δlong = long2− long1
  • a = sin²(Δlat/2) + cos(lat1).cos(lat2).sin²(Δlong/2)
  • c = 2.atan2(√a, √(1−a))
  • d = R.c

(Note that angles need to be in radians to pass to trig functions).

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See the SO question Geospatial Coordinates and Distance in Kilometres for insight and links. The conversion between miles and kilometres is discussed; you can omit it to get the answer in miles. The discussion also includes URLs to external sources of information.

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Check out the Aviation Formulary (http://williams.best.vwh.net/avform.htm) for more formulas than you could ever need for calculating things like this.

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There is a great php class for handling this sort of thing, including distance between zip codes, written by micah carrick originally. I've put together a step by step for implementing it which might help. http://go.sparkfire.net/2009/09/search-by-location-miles-from-zipcode-in-php/

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In your zip table you need to grab the coordinates (lat,long) for the two points for which you want to get the distance.

You can then either calculate the distance right in the SQL or with PHP. Both methods are outlined in this post:

http://dev.strategystar.net/2011/10/mysql-php-get-distance-between-two-coordinates-in-miles-kilometers/

The calculation in the example is based on the formula already discussed in this thread. It provides the radius for the earth in both miles and kilometers so it will allow you to get the distance between two points in both units.

The link above is great because the method for calculation does not include any magic numbers, just the radius of the earth!

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https://developers.google.com/maps/documentation/distancematrix/ - includes geocoding of city, state, country and postalcodes.

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NB: "Use of the service in an application that doesn't display a Google map is prohibited." –  webaware Dec 10 '13 at 1:34

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