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What, if any, is the difference between list and list[:] in python?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 51 down vote accepted

When reading, list is a reference to the original list, and list[:] shallow-copies the list.

When assigning, list (re)binds the name and list[:] slice-assigns, replacing what was previously in the list.

Also, don't use list as a name since it shadows the built-in.

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+1 for warning about shadowing a builtin –  Kimvais Aug 16 '12 at 19:56
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The latter is a reference to a copy of the list and not a reference to the list. So it's very useful.

>>> li = [1,2,3]
>>> li2 = li
>>> li3 = li[:]
>>> li2[0] = 0
>>> li
[0, 2, 3]
>>> li3
[1, 2, 3]
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However, if the list elements are lists themselves, even list1 = list[:] has its problems. Consider:

>>> a = [[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]]
>>> b = a[:]
>>> b[0].remove(2)
>>> b 
[[1, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]]
>>> a
[[1, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]]

This happens because each list element being copied to b is a list itself, and this copying of lists involves the same problem that occurs with the normal list1 = list2. The shortest way out that I've found is to explicitly copy every list element this way:

>>> a = [[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]]
>>> b=[[j for j in i] for i in a]   
>>> b
[[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]]
>>> b[0].remove(2)
>>> b
[[1, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]]
>>> a
[[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]]

Of course, for every additional degree of nesting in the nested list, the copying code deepens by an additional inline for loop.

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This will run into serious problems if you have different or unknown levels of nesting in your outer list (i may not be iterable) If you have nested lists, you should be using the copy module, use b = copy.deepcopy(a) instead of nested for loops. –  RoundTower Jul 12 '11 at 11:53
    
^Thanks for the tip! –  Abhranil Das Jul 12 '11 at 15:18
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To apply the first list to a variable will create a reference to the original list. The second list[i] will create a shallow copy.

for example:

foo = [1,2,3]
bar = foo
foo[0] = 4

bar and foo will now be:

[4,2,3]

but:

foo = [1,2,3]
bar = foo[:]
foo[0] = 4

result will be:

bar == [1,2,3]
foo == [4,2,3]

: is to slice.

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li[:] creates a copy of the original list. But it does not refer to the same list object. Hence you don't risk changing the original list by changing the copy created by li[:].

for example:

>>> list1 = [1,2,3]
>>> list2 = list1
>>> list3 = list1[:]
>>> list1[0] = 4
>>> list2
[4, 2, 3]
>>> list3
[1, 2, 3]

Here list2 is changed by changing list1 but list3 doesn't change.

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