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Recently, I was asked to implement a class as part of a selection process. I did the program as requested. However, I failed in the test. I am really curious to know what is wrong in my solution. Any help is much appreciated. The question and my solution are given below

Question:

Implement a thread safe class which fires an event every second from construction. There need to be a function for finding the seconds elapsed. This class has to implement IDisposable and any calls to seconds elapsed function after calling dispose should fail.

My solution:

namespace TimeCounter
{
public delegate void SecondsElapsedHandler(object o, EventArgs e);
/// <summary>
/// Summary description for SecondCounter
/// </summary>
public class SecondCounter : IDisposable
{
    private volatile int nSecondsElapsed;
    Timer myTimer;
    private readonly object EventLock = new object();
    private SecondsElapsedHandler secondsHandler;
    public SecondCounter()
    {
        nSecondsElapsed = 0;
        myTimer = new Timer();
        myTimer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(OneSecondElapsed);
        myTimer.Interval = 1000;
        myTimer.AutoReset = false;
        myTimer.Start();
    }

    public void OneSecondElapsed(object source, ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        try
        {
            SecondsElapsedHandler handlerCopy;
            lock (EventLock)
            {
                handlerCopy = secondsHandler;
                nSecondsElapsed++;

            }
            if (secondsHandler != null)
            {
                secondsHandler(this, e);
            }
        }
        catch (Exception exp)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Exception thrown from SecondCounter OneSecondElapsed " + exp.Message);
        }
        finally
        {
            if (myTimer != null)
            {
                myTimer.Enabled = true;
            }
        }
    }

    public event SecondsElapsedHandler AnotherSecondElapsed
    {
        add
        {
            lock (EventLock)
            {
                secondsHandler += value;
            }
        }
        remove
        {
            lock (EventLock)
            {
                secondsHandler -= value;
            }

        }
    }

    public int SecondsElapsed()
    {
        if (this.IsDisposed)
        {
            throw new ObjectDisposedException("SecondCounter");
        }
        return nSecondsElapsed;

    }

    private bool IsDisposed = false;
    public void Dispose()
    {
        Dispose(true);
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }
    private void Dispose(bool Disposing)
    {
        if (!IsDisposed)
        {
            if (Disposing)
            {

            }
            if (myTimer != null)
            {
                myTimer.Dispose();
            }

        }
        secondsHandler = null;
        IsDisposed = true;

    }
    ~SecondCounter()
    {
        Dispose(false);
    }
}
}
share|improve this question
    
Where's your Dispose method? –  BFree Nov 2 '10 at 20:47
1  
Were you told anything else other than that you failed? Was any rationale given for the decision to fail you? –  Mark Byers Nov 2 '10 at 20:48
    
BFree, Sorry for missing that. I edited the original post with dispose implementation. –  Jimmy Nov 2 '10 at 20:51
    
Mark, no explanation given. –  Jimmy Nov 2 '10 at 20:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are a few problems:

  1. You might have been penalized for general Exception swallowing though that's not specifically related to threading issues.

  2. There's a race condition on your timer.Dispose, as you could Dispose the timer before it is set Enabled again, resulting in an Exception.

  3. You never set myTimer to null in Dispose.

  4. You're accessing the managed class myTimer from the finalizer (disposing=false), which is a bad idea.

  5. The explicit implementation of the event with locking is unnecessary. Delegates are immutable and adding/removing an event will never result in an invalid delegate state, though there can be race conditions if delegates are added/removed around the same time that the callback is fired. If you use the standard 'public event' declaration without an explicit backing private delegate, the synchronization will be handled automatically.

  6. (minor point) If you're implementing the full Dispose pattern, it's customary to mark the Dispose(bool disposing) method as protected virtual, so that deriving classes can hook into the disposal mechanism. Better yet, mark your class sealed and you can eliminate the finalizer entirely.

share|improve this answer
    
That's a great review Dan. Thank you. –  Jimmy Nov 2 '10 at 21:52
    
@Jimmy, glad to help. I still mess up 'thread-safe' code regularly and try to write as little of it as possible. The best way to get thread-safety is to avoid having threads interact in the first place. –  Dan Bryant Nov 2 '10 at 22:26
    
@Dan Bryant: Why do you think locking on events is unnecessary? Delegates may be immutable, but that doesn't imply that += and -= are atomic. If two threads simultaneously attempt to remove subscriptions, they might both grab the old delegate, remove themselves to from, and write it back; the second removal attempt would generate a permanent wrong subscription. One could use CompareExchange spinloops instead of locks; this could be faster if subscription changes are rare, but could logjam if they are too frequent. –  supercat Nov 4 '10 at 15:42
    
@supercat, the compiler has special support for synchronizing the event add and remove, so you don't need to write this yourself. The exception is that, in versions prior to .NET 4.0, the synchronization will not occur if you subscribe to the event from within the class itself. In particular, the auto-generated event code adorns the event accessors with [MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.Synchronized)]. The main downside to this default implementation is that it does the locking on 'this'. –  Dan Bryant Nov 4 '10 at 16:00
    
@Dan Bryant: I may be confusing VB and C#, but I thought what the code here was doing was replacing the default add/remove handlers with custom ones (and the += notion simply meant 'delegate.combine'. What would one do in C# if one didn't want to have a lock on 'this'? In any case, if one is using .net prior to 4.0 and if any local code might now or in future add or remove subscriptions, that would sound like a good reason not to trust the built-in locking. –  supercat Nov 4 '10 at 18:00

Your finalizer is probably broken. It correctly passes false as the Disposing parameter. This should tell Dispose(bool) to avoid attempting to dispose other managed objects. But in that method you put:

if (Disposing)
{

}
if (myTimer != null)
{
    myTimer.Dispose();
}

So you ignore the value of Disposing. This means that you call the timer's Dispose method from the finalizer thread, when that object may already have been finalized (if it has a finalizer, which it probably does). Finalizers run in an unpredictable order. It's generally recommended to not make calls to other GC-managed objects from a finalizer.

In fact, it's usually recommended that you don't write finalizers at all these days. The question didn't ask you to write one! It's unfortunate that most tutorials about IDisposable also talk about finalizers. They're different subjects.

You also catch Exception, the universal exception base class. This means you catch things like NullReferenceException. Not usually a good idea. You also log to the console, which is not worth much in a GUI or server-based application.

You can replace:

myTimer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(OneSecondElapsed);

with:

myTimer.Elapsed += OneSecondElapsed;

Your variable naming is inconsistent. Refer to the Microsoft guidelines.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, Daniel. –  Jimmy Nov 2 '10 at 22:06
    
//In fact, it's usually recommended that you don't write finalizers at all these days// Is there any reason why one should //ever// add a finalizer to a base class which isn't explicitly designed for finalization? Even if one wants to log a cleanup failure, I would think that would be better handled by having the class create a finalizable object to which it holds the only reference. –  supercat Nov 4 '10 at 15:44

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