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Is there a way to write a conditional switch statement in javascript?

I'm guessing not, since the following is always going to default:

    var raw_value = 11.0;
    switch(raw_value)
    {
        case (raw_value > 10.0):
          height = 48;
          width = 36;
          break;
        case (raw_value > 5.0):
          height = 40;
          width = 30;
          break;
        default:
          height = 16;
          width = 12;
          break;
    }

If not, what should I use instead - a long if/else statement?

thanks :)

share|improve this question
    
One nice solution would be an array, and a JavaScript version of this recent PHP question.... but that's not going to be trivial to port. –  Pekka 웃 Nov 2 '10 at 21:24
    
It's not THAT long of an if - else statement (if, else if, else). Pretty standard (and less indentation). –  Jared Updike Nov 2 '10 at 21:26
    
If/else takes less space, easier to read, less to write and less prone to self inflicted bugs.. –  BGerrissen Nov 2 '10 at 22:10

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

In a switch statement, the evaluated value of the switch expression is compared the the evaluated values of the cases. So here the value of raw_value (number) is compared to raw_value > 10.0 (comparison expression) and raw_value > 5.0 (comparison expression).

So unless one of your case expressions yield a number equal to 11.0 or you use the switch expression true, you will always get the default case.

Just use a simple if/else instead:

var raw_value = 11.0;
if (raw_value > 10.0) {
    height = 48;
    width = 36;
} else if (raw_value > 5.0) {
    height = 40;
    width = 30;
} else {
    height = 16;
    width = 12;
}
share|improve this answer
    
And without the need for break, it's just as clean as the original. –  user166390 Dec 15 '10 at 22:25

Like this:

var raw_value = 11.0;
switch(true) {
    case (raw_value > 10.0):
      height = 48;
      width = 36;
      break;
    case (raw_value > 5.0):
      height = 40;
      width = 30;
      break;
    default:
      height = 16;
      width = 12;
}

The expressions in the case statements will evaluate to true or false, and if that matches the switch condition... violá.

Bonus: you can invert the whole logic by simply replacing true with false. With if ... else if statements, you'd have to rewrite every if-clause individually.

share|improve this answer
1  
This should be the right answer, as it does what the OP asked in the style asked. However, I had a hard time the first time I saw a switch(true) statement. –  Juan Mendes Dec 15 '10 at 22:16
    
Glad to have helped at least one person. :) –  DanMan Dec 17 '10 at 21:49
1  
Up voted and should be marked as the answer. Most programmers (or maybe just me) with server language exp. find the JS implementation non-intuitive. Its kind of weird starting the evaluated expression and working backwards! –  Matthew Pitts May 29 '14 at 22:53

No, the switch statement does not work used like that. However, this statement is not always simpler. For example, the switch version takes 15 lines:

var raw_value = 11.0;
switch(raw_value) {
    case (raw_value > 10.0):
      height = 48;
      width = 36;
      break;
    case (raw_value > 5.0):
      height = 40;
      width = 30;
      break;
    default:
      height = 16;
      width = 12;
      break;
}

and the "long" if/else version only 11:

var raw_value = 11.0;
if (raw_value > 10.0) {
      height = 48;
      width = 36;
} else if (raw_value > 5.0) {
      height = 40;
      width = 30;
} else {
      height = 16;
      width = 12;
}

So in your case, it is better to use the second one than the first...

share|improve this answer

You can't really do conditional switches. I'd probably try something like this

height_weight = (r > 10.0) ? [48,36]:
                (r > 5.0)  ? [40,30]:
                [16,12];
share|improve this answer
    
do your really think so? javascriptkit.com/javatutors/switch.shtml –  netadictos Nov 2 '10 at 21:52
1  
Only useful if you don't use a minifier like YUI compressor or Google Closure Compiler. Otherwise, don't do this! –  BGerrissen Nov 2 '10 at 22:09
    
Yes you can do it, did you see DanMan's answer? –  Juan Mendes Dec 15 '10 at 22:25

Don't try this at home, or take it seriously, this is just for fun...

function conditionalSwitch( value, cond, callback /* cond, callback, cond, callback, ... */ ) 
{
  for (var i = 1; i < arguments.length; i += 2) {
    if ( arguments[i](value) ) {
      arguments[i+1](value);
      return;
    }
  }
}

var width, height;

conditionalSwitch( 5.1,

  function(val) { return val > 10 },
  function () {
    height = 48;
    width = 36
  },

  function(val) { return val > 5 },
  function () {
    height = 40;
    width = 30
  },

  //Default

  function(val) { return true },
  function () {
    height = 16;
    width = 12;
  }
)

console.log(width, height);
share|improve this answer
    
With these sort of things it's mostly about syntactic sugar.... –  Lodewijk Jan 8 at 14:35

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