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the code “ : ” in php

I often see a lot of php code using ? and :, but I don't actually understand what it is for. Here an example:

$selected = ($key == $config['default_currency']) ? ' selected="selected"' : '';

Can someone clear me up, please? :)

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marked as duplicate by Quentin, Pekka 웃, poke, webbiedave, Rob Hruska Nov 2 '10 at 21:52

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
php.net/manual/… –  poke Nov 2 '10 at 21:45
1  
(related) What does that symbol mean in PHP –  Gordon Nov 27 '10 at 0:41

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted
(condition ? val1 : val2)

evaluates to val1 if condition is true, or val2 if condition is false.


Since PHP 5.3, you may also see an even more obscure form that leaves out val1:

(val0 ?: val2)

evaluates to val0 if val0 evaluates to a non-false value, or val2 otherwise. Yikes!


See http://php.net/manual/en/language.operators.comparison.php

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In pseudocode,

variable = (condition) ? statement1 : statement2

maps to

if (condition is true)
then
variable = statement1
else
variable = statement2
end if
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It's the ternary conditional operator, just like in C.

Your code is equivalent to:

if ($key == $config['default_currency'])
{
   $selected = ' selected="selected"';
}
else
{
   $selected = '';
}
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It's shorthand for an if statement

You can turn that statement into this:

if ($key == $config['default_currency']) {
    $selected = ' selected="selected"';
} else {
    $selected = '';
}
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It's the ternary operator. It's basically a if / else on one line.

For example, those lines :

if (!empty($_POST['value'])) {
    $value = $_POST['value'];
} else {
    $value = "";
}

can be shortened by this line :

$value = (!empty($_POST['value'])) ? $_POST['value'] : "";

It can make code easier to read if you don't abuse it.

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+1 for if you don't abuse it. I've seen many instances of nested ternary conditionals and it makes me want to cry every time. –  netcoder Nov 2 '10 at 21:48
    
+1 to if you don't abuse it. (for the love of all that is good, DO NOT NEST!) –  drudge Nov 2 '10 at 21:49

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