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I want to declare multiple variables in a function

function foo() {
    var src_arr     = new Array(); 
    var caption_arr = new Array();
    var fav_arr     = new Array();
    var hidden_arr  = new Array();
}

Is this the correct way to do this?

var src_arr = caption_arr = fav_arr = hidden_arr = new Array();
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4 Answers 4

up vote 43 down vote accepted

Yes, it is if you want them all to point to the same object in memory, but most likely you want them to be individual arrays so that if one mutates, the others are not affected.

If you do not want them all to point to the same object, do

var one = [], two = [];

The [] is a shorthand literal for creating an array.

Here's a console log which indicates the difference:

>> one = two = [];
[]
>> one.push(1)
1
>> one
[1]
>> two
[1]
>> one = [], two = [];
[]
>> one.push(1)
1
>> one
[1]
>> two
[]

In the first portion, I defined one and two to point to the same object/array in memory. If I use the .push method it pushes 1 to the array, and so both one and two have 1 inside. In the second since I defined unique arrays per variable so when I pushed to one, two was unaffected.

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7  
Bonuspoint for not using new Array() –  DanMan Nov 2 '10 at 22:18
1  
bonuspoint for demonstrating how it works ;) –  jcolebrand Nov 2 '10 at 22:24
    
I was having problems, as expected. Thanks for the explain! –  FFish Nov 2 '10 at 22:24
    
btw.. why is new Array() bad? –  FFish Nov 2 '10 at 22:27
    
it's not really "bad" it's just overly verbose. [] is more succinct. –  meder Nov 2 '10 at 22:29

Please stay away from that assignment pattern, even if you wanted to have all variables pointing to the same object.

In fact, only the first one will be a variable declaration, the rest are just assignments to possibly undeclared identifiers!

Assigning a value to an undeclared identifier (aka undeclared assignment) is strongly discouraged because, if the identifier is not found on the scope chain, a GLOBAL variable will be created. For example:

function test() {
    // We intend these to be local variables of 'test'.
    var foo = bar = baz = xxx = 5;
    typeof foo; // "number", while inside 'test'.
}
test();

// Testing in the global scope. test's variables no longer exist.
typeof foo; // "undefined", As desired, but,
typeof bar; // "number", BAD!, leaked to the global scope.
typeof baz; // "number"
typeof xxx; // "number"

Moreover, the ECMAScript 5th Strict Mode, disallows this kind of assignments. Under strict mode an assignment made to a non-declared identifier will cause a TypeError exception, to prevent implied globals.

By contrast, here is what we see if written correctly:

function test() {
    // We correctly declare these to be local variables inside 'test'.
    var foo, bar, baz, xxx;
    foo = bar = baz = xxx = 5;
}
test();

// Testing in the global scope. test's variables no longer exist.
typeof foo; // "undefined"
typeof bar; // "undefined"
typeof baz; // "undefined"
typeof xxx; // "undefined"
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mmm, so the best way is: var one_arr = []; var two_arr = []; I was wondering about the difference between declaration and assignment. So only the first one is declared? –  FFish Nov 2 '10 at 22:39
1  
@FFish: In the above example, the var statement is used only in the foo identifier, the rest of assignments at the right are evaluated from right-to-left, due the associativity of the assignment operator, (Imagine: var foo = value; where value is the expression with multiple assignments (bar = baz = xxx = 5), they have nothing to to with the var statement.) However you can use commas to declare multiple variables with a single var statement: var one_arr = [], two_arr = [], three_arr = []; –  CMS Nov 2 '10 at 22:53

no, your seconds statement will create 4 references to the same array, you want

var src_arr     = [],
    caption_arr = [],
    fav_arr     = [],
    hidden_arr  = [];
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all those variables will refer to one Array object

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