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In the method below there are numerous case statements (many have been removed) that make calls to Manager classes. For example, the first one calls ApplicationManager.GetByGUID. Any time a "manager" class is used, security checks occur.

Problem: I have entities that may be permitted to some of these but not all. So when this method gets run, if one of them craps out it'll throw a security exception and crash the whole report.

Someone has suggested to me that I could just throw try-catch blocks around each case but the more I read the more I feel like that might be sloppy. I admittedly am not very knowledged about exceptions...I was hoping someone could suggest a way to do this with more finesse...I need to be able to get back good data and ignore the ones that throw security exceptions....or maybe try-catches are ok in this case?

Hope that makes sense...thanks


private string GetLookup(string value, string type)
{
    MySqlConnection mconn = new MySqlConnection(ConfigurationSettings.AppSettings["UnicornConnectionString_SELECT"]);

    try
    {
        mconn.Open();

        lock (reportLookups)
        {
            if (reportLookups.ContainsKey(type+value))
                return reportLookups[type+value].ToString();
            else if (reportLookups.ContainsKey(value))
                return reportLookups[value].ToString();
            else
            {
                switch (type)
                {
                    case "ATTR_APPLICATIONNAME":
                        if (value != Guid.Empty.ToString())
                        {
                            reportLookups.Add(type + value, applicationManager.GetByGUID(value).Name);
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            reportLookups.Add(type + value, "Unknown");
                        }
                        mconn.Close();
                        return reportLookups[type + value].ToString();
                        break;
                    case "ATTR_CITYNAME":
                        reportLookups.Add(type + value, UMConstantProvider.UMConstantProvider.GetConstant<UMString64>(int.Parse(value), UMMetricsResourceLibrary.Enumerations.ConstantType.CITY_NAME, ref mconn));
                        mconn.Close();
                        return reportLookups[type + value].ToString();
                        break;
                    case "ATTR_COUNTRYNAME":
                        reportLookups.Add(type + value, UMConstantProvider.UMConstantProvider.GetConstant<UMString2>(int.Parse(value), UMMetricsResourceLibrary.Enumerations.ConstantType.COUNTRY_NAME, ref mconn));
                        mconn.Close();
                        return reportLookups[type + value].ToString();
                        break;
                    case "ATTR_ITEMDURATION":

                        MediaItem mi = mediaItemManager.GetMediaItemByGUID(value);
                        if (mi.MediaItemTypeID == (int)MediaItemType.ExternalVideo || mi.MediaItemTypeID == (int)MediaItemType.ExternalAudio)
                        {
                            reportLookups.Add(type + value, mediaItemManager.GetMediaItemByGUID(value).ExternalDuration);
                            mconn.Close();
                            return reportLookups[type + value].ToString();
                        }
                        else
                        {

                            List<BinaryAsset> bins = fileSystemManager.GetBinaryAssetsByMediaItemGuid(value, mi.DraftVersion);
                            var durationasset = from d in bins
                                                where d.Duration != 0
                                                select d.Duration;

                            if (durationasset.Count() > 0)
                            {

                                reportLookups.Add(type + value, durationasset.ToList()[0]);

                            }
                            else
                            {
                                reportLookups.Add(type + value, 0);
                                mconn.Close();
                                return reportLookups[type + value].ToString();
                            }


                        }

                        break;
                }
            }
            return string.Empty;
        }
    }
    finally 
    {
        mconn.Close();
    }
}
share|improve this question
5  
i think this is more a case of code refactoring here. your switching on the type parameter, which is passed in - so why not seperate out into different methods? will make your code much more readable/easier to maintain. also, why are you doing mconn.Close(); in both the case statements and the finally block? just do it once in the finally. –  RPM1984 Nov 2 '10 at 22:59
    
+1 @RPM1984, i agree –  Alex Lo Nov 2 '10 at 23:03
    
wow that was quick, thanks guys –  J Benjamin Nov 2 '10 at 23:14
    
something else I came across was to use "using" on the connection so I won't have to worry about closing it...anyway, I kinda like the idea of separating out into methods best so I'll try that (and ya, I dunno why the original coder put in all those .close(), I'll zap 'em) :) –  J Benjamin Nov 2 '10 at 23:21
    
@J Benjamin - yes, go for the using statement whenever possible. then you don't need to call .Close() at all. The benefit of using is also that you can scope the database code inside the block, resulting in the open late, close early advice on db connections. good luck. –  RPM1984 Nov 2 '10 at 23:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As a rule, Exceptions should indicate that something went wrong. If you're expecting exceptions during the course of a typical run through this method, you should change your APIs to allow you to avoid that exception:

if (mediaItemManager.CanAccessMediaItem(value))
{
    MediaItem mi = mediaItemManager.GetMediaItemByGUID(value);
    ....
}

Here's a quick attempt on my part to refactor this code into something more reasonable:

private string GetLookup(string value, string type)
{
    var lookupKey = type + value;                        
    using (MySqlConnection mconn = new MySqlConnection(ConfigurationSettings.AppSettings["UnicornConnectionString_SELECT"]))
    {
        mconn.Open();
        lock (reportLookups)
        {
            if (reportLookups.ContainsKey(lookupKey))
            {
                return reportLookups[lookupKey].ToString();
            }
            var value = GetLookupValue(type, value);
            reportLookups[lookupKey] = value;
            return value;
        }
    }
}

private string GetLookupValue(string type, string value)
{
    switch (type)
    {
        case "ATTR_APPLICATIONNAME":
            return value == Guid.Empty.ToString() 
                ? "Unknown"
                : applicationManager.CanGetByGUID(value)
                    ? applicationManager.GetByGUID(value).Name
                    : string.Empty;
        case "ATTR_CITYNAME":
            return UMConstantProvider.UMConstantProvider.GetConstant<UMString64>(int.Parse(value), UMMetricsResourceLibrary.Enumerations.ConstantType.CITY_NAME, ref mconn);
        case "ATTR_COUNTRYNAME":
            return UMConstantProvider.UMConstantProvider.GetConstant<UMString2>(int.Parse(value), UMMetricsResourceLibrary.Enumerations.ConstantType.COUNTRY_NAME, ref mconn);
        case "ATTR_ITEMDURATION":
            if(mediaItemManager.CanGetMediaItemByGUID(value)) {
                MediaItem mi = mediaItemManager.GetMediaItemByGUID(value);
                if (mi.MediaItemTypeID == (int)MediaItemType.ExternalVideo || mi.MediaItemTypeID == (int)MediaItemType.ExternalAudio)
                {
                    return mediaItemManager.GetMediaItemByGUID(value).ExternalDuration;
                }
                else
                {
                    List<BinaryAsset> bins = fileSystemManager.GetBinaryAssetsByMediaItemGuid(value, mi.DraftVersion);
                    var durationasset = from d in bins
                                        where d.Duration != 0
                                        select d.Duration;
                    return durationasset.FirstOrDefault() ?? "0";
                }
            }
            else 
            {
                return string.Empty;
            }
        default:
            return string.Empty;
    }
}

Since I don't understand the full scope of this code, I probably oversimplified some aspects of it, but you can see that there is a lot of refactoring to be done here. In the future, you might want to run some code by http://refactormycode.com/, until you get accustomed to using best practices.

share|improve this answer
    
Though it's often still necessary to have the try-catch just in case the validity can change between the check and the usage. The classic case is FileNotFound, where a file existed, but was deleted right after you checked. It's still better to check first, if possible or have a 'Try' version of the method that doesn't throw. –  Dan Bryant Nov 2 '10 at 23:32
    
@Dan Bryant: Good point. I especially like the TryGet... strategy as it avoids race conditions. In many cases, we still need to ask ourselves, "What should really happen if that occurs?" In this example, if the user has their rights to a particular class of object revoked midway through the generation of a report, do I still want them to see the first half of the report, which may contain some of those values they're no longer allowed to see? In such off-the-wall cases, I'm usually content to say it's not that bad if the report generation throws an exception now and then. –  StriplingWarrior Nov 2 '10 at 23:44
    
Thanks for all your comments everyone...I've lurked to StackOverflow in the past for answers but this was the first time I've signed up and gotten involved. Great site, great minds, ...I look forward to being a part of more discussions in the future –  J Benjamin Nov 3 '10 at 15:40

Somewhere you will have some code like:

foreach(Request req in allRequests)
{
   Reply result = MakeReply(req);
   WriteReply(result);
}

Turn this into:

foreach(Request req in allRequests)
{
   Reply result;
   try
   {
      result = CreateReply(req);
   }
   catch(SecurityException ex)
   {
      result = CreateReplyUnauthorized();
   }
   catch(Exception ex) // always the last
   {
      LogException(ex); // for bug hunting

      // Don't show the exception to the user - that's a security risk
      result = CreateReplySystemError();
   }

   WriteReply(result);
}

You might want to put the try-catch into a separate function as the body of your foreach loop is getting large once you catch several types of exceptions.

StriplingWarrior is also right in his reply: "Exceptions should indicate that something went wrong." Let them propagate to the main loop and show them there.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for all your comments everyone...I've lurked to StackOverflow in the past for answers but this was the first time I've signed up and gotten involved. Great site, great minds, ...I look forward to being a part of more discussions in the future –  J Benjamin Nov 3 '10 at 15:39

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