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Currently our company uses an escalation database within Lotus Notes. Our escalation database handles issues that can't be solved by L1-L3 support and are therefore escalated to development. This database is used by the entire company and thus encompasses many departments (hardware, firmware, software) and products. Each department and product has specific information that is needed to help in debugging a particular customers problem.

Recently we have been having a lot of trouble with the Lotus Notes database in terms of performance and I'm looking for other options. As a company we are also moving away from Lotus Notes in the future. I was wondering what kind of workflow management software other people are using to handle something like this?

I've been looking around and haven't found anything that looks entirely promising, and so I have been contemplating how to homeroll one should the need arise. My current planning path is to have completely dynamic forms that are stored in a database and as someone moves through the forms additional inputs are added based on selections they have made. I understand this is going to be difficult to do right and not confuse people as they add products and departments in the future. So another question would what major pitfalls would you encounter with the above design, and what to look out for? And if anyone has home-rolled a system before any problems that you have ran into?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't know of anything to handle what your asking, although there must be an off the shelf solution for such a task.

If your considering Roll Your Own, I would recommend taking a look at CouchDB as it has many similarities with Lotus Notes and features that have greatly enhanced the whole experience.

http://couchdb.apache.org

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CouchDB

You would need to get up to speed with it, but since you are familiar with Lotus notes, should be an easy learning curve.

Hope this helps.

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what kind of workflow management software other people are using to handle something like this?

  • At work we have people using a system called Gotcha, I just googled it and can't find it (!) and I'm not at work so can't easily get more info.
  • The main LOB workflow is provided by an old legacy Main-Frame system (don't go there!).
  • I was involved in building a major workflow system in .Net a few years ago - we used K2 Workflow (current product name is 'BlackPearl') as the core workflow system. K2 is really powerful and is well suited to a .Net / Microsoft environment,and (in theory at least) it will integrate with SharePoint.

My current planning path is to have completely dynamic forms ... what major pitfalls would you encounter with the above design?

Not so much a pitfall - but managing the data will be a challenge. Having Dynamic Forms is probably going to mean one of several things in terms of the physical design of the database:

  • The table structure reflects the forms structure; adding a field to the form means adding a column to the DB; and adding a new form means adding a new table to the DB. This is probably ok if the forms aren't going to change much - the more they change the harder it will be to maintain.
  • Semi generic table structure: some common columns and then some generic columns like FormField1, FormField2, etc. This would be more manageable, and you could realistically automate this so that users could self provision fields. The downside is that you'd be working to a constrained number of columns / table schema. Changes to this would be very challenging.

In both of the cases above the physical data structure closely matches the logical one. One of the key problems with this is that for your app to auto-magically make extra columns requires it to have greater security rights on the system - so you won't want to do that on anything that was public internet facing. Alternatively:

  • Have a single 'narrow' table where the field values are stored more like key-value pairs.

This approach would support a solution that let users self provision fields and forms, and there's no limit. The downside is that reporting is much more difficult and will be slower; you can get around that by migrating the 'volatile' transactional data to a database designed for reporting.

A term often used for this sort of database design is 'NoSql Database', CouchDB (suggested by @WeNeedAnswers) is an example of this.

A related pitfall (if you allow users to self provision forms/fields) is managing the data and it's quality; you don't want people using different terms for the same thing, or the same term meaning multiple things.

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I've been looking around and haven't found anything that looks entirely promising, and so I have been contemplating how to homeroll one should the need arise

Look harder. No offense!

From an architectural perspective my first question would be 'do we really need to build'? Building software is non-trivial, specifically one that you're going to maintain overtime.

It's not clear what your functional requirements or existing technology standards are, but both will influence which options in the market are best for you. Then of course you have the support aspects, licensing, etc.

I'd say you need to draw up a list of relevant evaluation criteria and evaluate any likely candidate COTS solutions you can find (Open Source might be an option too), as well as a custom build; you need to evaluate against a firm set of criteria and work out the TCO (Total Cost of Ownership). Yes TCO might sound like marketing hype / business buzzword - but at the end of the day it's something you simply have to do (unless you're a millionaire and money is no issue).

Tools that do the kind of thing you're after are pretty common - hence my initial (and admittedly somewhat flippant) response.

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here to help, why spend hours googling when stackover flow might be a quicker and a more informed solution. –  WeNeedAnswers Nov 3 '10 at 1:28
2  
WeNeedAnswers is aptly named to make apt comments. –  Stefan Kendall Nov 3 '10 at 1:34
    
My answer was focused on the 'contemplating how to homeroll' aspect, which I think is valid at this stage - I (mistakenly?) got the impression Patrick was possibly going down that route too soon. I note @WeNeedAnswers also included a comment along that vein. –  Adrian K Nov 3 '10 at 2:28

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