Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to filter out rows within a SQL table which has values in one column that are in a specified list of values. The simplified table looks something like: (Sorry for the bad formatting, never posted here before)

Error Codes     | Other Column 1 | Other Column 2 ...

--------------------------------------------------
F010,F123,F345, |  ......        | .....

F231,FC85,F904, |  ......        | .....

FC432,F0425,NA, |  ......        | .....

 ....

I first split the Error Codes column to get each of the 3 error codes, which is a comma separated string of values. Then I need to filter out rows with all three error codes within a given list such as ('F010', 'FC542', 'FB943'). I am running this on a Teradata DB, this is the portion of the query, but does not seem to be filtering out all combinations within the list:

SELECT ... , 

CASE
WHEN ( substr(a.error_code, 1, position(',' in a.error_code)-1) in ('F010', 'FC542', 'FB012' 'FB943', 'NA')

AND substr(a.error_code,
              position(',' in a.error_code)+1, 
              position(',' in substr(a.error_code,  position(',' in a.error_code)+1, Characters(a.error_code)-position(',' in a.error_code)))-1) in ('F010', 'FC542', 'FB012' 'FB943', 'NA')

AND substr(a.error_code,
          position(',' in a.error_code) + position(',' in substr(a.error_code,    position(',' in a.error_code)+1, Characters(a.error_code)-position(',' in a.error_code)))+1,
          Characters(a.error_code)-(position(',' in a.error_code) + position(',' in substr(a.error_code,  position(',' in a.error_code)+1, Characters(a.error_code)-position(',' in a.error_code))))-1) in ('F010', 'FC542', 'FB012' 'FB943', 'NA') )

THEN 'No'

ELSE 'Yes'

end Error_Module,

...
FROM Error_code_table a

WHERE Error_Module = 'Yes'

As a side, the Characters() function is the same as Length().

Thanks, Mike

share|improve this question
2  
as Bob Jarvis has observed, multiple values in a comma-separated list in a single field make this much harder. I will go further, and say that this should never be done if at all avoidable - it is a violation of first normal form, and completely goes against all relational design principles. –  Mark Bannister Nov 3 '10 at 13:38
    
I agree, unfortunately this is how the database is set up, and what I have to work with. –  Mike Nov 3 '10 at 17:00

2 Answers 2

Having multiple values in a comma-separated list contained in a single column makes this much more difficult. This task would be much easier if this could be reworked so that there's only a single error code per row.

I'm not familiar with Teradata, but looking at Google it appears they're big into analytics and business intelligence. As such, I'd hope they have some regular expression functionality available and I think that would be a good place for you to start looking. For example, in Oracle I'd do something like the following to extract the error codes from the string:

SELECT TRIM(REGEXP_REPLACE(ERROR_CODES, '(.*),.*,.*', '\1')),
       TRIM(REGEXP_REPLACE(ERROR_CODES, '.*,(.*),.*', '\1')),
       TRIM(REGEXP_REPLACE(ERROR_CODES, '.*,.*,(.*)', '\1'))
  INTO strErr1, strErr2, strErr3
  FROM DUAL;

Good luck.

share|improve this answer
    
Regular expression support is not available in Teradata through release 12. It should be available in either Teradata 13 or 13.10 –  Rob Paller Nov 3 '10 at 12:53

If the error code does not appear at the start of the list, it will always appear in the form ,<error code>,.

SELECT
    CASE
        WHEN substr(a.error_code, 1, position(',' in a.error_code) - 1) in ('F010', 'FC542', 'FB012', 'FB943', 'NA')
            OR a.error_code LIKE ANY ('%,F010,%', '%,FC542,%', '%,FB012,%', '%,FB943,%', '%,NA,%')
        THEN 'No'
        ELSE 'Yes'
    End Error_Module
FROM Error_code_table a
WHERE Error_Module = 'Yes';
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.