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I have been experimenting with a game that I'm trying to make. I found I had two methods that were identical except for the for loop, which was simply the reverse of the former.

I tried to make it so I can use the same code forwards or backwards. I have ended up with:

for (int i = start; i != (finish + 1 * ((start < finish) ? 1 : -1)); i += 1 * ((start < finish) ? 1 : -1))

A) B) I wanted to share this concept with everyone.

B) I'm curious about efficiencies of such a loop. I know it is calculating the target number and the incriment factor when accessed, but I have no idea how to test it.

C) While I'm at it, I found a single line that swaps two variables without using a temporary. It takes a moment to read, but is this better (code wise) than using a temp? (3rd line in main below)

I have tested it for function, and it runs as expected. If the second number is larger than the first number, it counts up. If not, it counts down. My test code was:

// A generic loop that can go up or down
import java.io.*;

public class reversable
{
  public static int start = 1;
  public static int finish = 10;

   public static void main(String[] args)
  {
     for (int i = start; i != (finish + 1 * ((start < finish) ? 1 : -1)); i += 1 * ((start < finish) ? 1 : -1))
     {
        System.out.println("i = " + i);
     }
     finish = (start + finish) - (start = finish);  
System.out.println("Finish = " + finish);
System.out.println("Start = " + start);
     for (int i = start; i != (finish + 1 * ((start < finish) ? 1 : -1)); i += 1 * ((start < finish) ? 1 : -1))
     {
        System.out.println("i = " + i);
     }
     finish = 10;
     for (int i = start; i != (finish + 1 * ((start < finish) ? 1 : -1)); i += 1 * ((start < finish) ? 1 : -1))
     {
        System.out.println("i = " + i);
     }
  }
}

Based on comments, would this be acceptable:

public static void reversable (int i, int j)
{
  if (i > j) int inc = -1;  // Count down
  else       int inc = 1;  // Count up
  j += inc;
  for (i; i != j; i += inc)
  {
    dostuff();
    morestuff();
    mostuff();
  }
}
share|improve this question
2  
The outcome of finish = (start + finish) - (start = finish); is not defined because different compilers are free to evaluate the two clauses in either order. See a similar example at the bottom of this page: cppreference.com/operator_precedence.html –  AlcubierreDrive Nov 3 '10 at 4:00
1  
@Jon: Java != C++. Java does not follow the same rules, and most things that are undefined in C/C++ have very precise definitions in Java. –  Mark Peters Nov 3 '10 at 15:59
    
@Mark Peters Oops, my mistake. Thanks for pointing that out. –  AlcubierreDrive Nov 4 '10 at 4:42

4 Answers 4

You should strive to write readable code, not code that does a lot of things in one line or has fancy tricks.

If I worked on a project with you I would likely want to strangle you after I read that for loop for the first time, that is if my head didn't explode trying to understand it first. Same goes for assignment within an assignment.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah. Try not to use ? and :, or I will think about coming over there and strangling you personally. Most likely, though, I'll send one of my assassins to do it. –  muntoo Nov 3 '10 at 2:33
4  
this code is evil. –  Ramp Nov 3 '10 at 2:36
2  
@muntoo: I am not against ternary, ? .. : .., nor I consider it evil. But I am definitely against smelly codes. –  Adeel Ansari Nov 3 '10 at 4:24
2  
"Always code as if the guy who ends up maintaining your code will be a violent psychopath who knows where you live." — Rick Osborne. From the list of favorite quotes programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/39/… –  K.U. Nov 3 '10 at 15:07

If I saw this code in production I would immediately refactor it in to something more readable, which would probably be something like what you started with.

Think about the reason you want to reduce code duplication. It's to make your code more maintainable. Do you feel like you've done that?

While I'm at it, I found a single line that swaps two variables without using a temporary. It takes a moment to read, but is this better (code wise) than using a temp?

This only works with numeric types, so I don't find it to be that useful. You've made your code less readable to someone who doesn't know the trick, which slows down maintenance of the code. I don't think it's worth the savings of one temp variable.

share|improve this answer
2  
I would change "slightly less readable" to "much less readable". With about 30 years of programming experience I am still not convinced it works as intended after looking at it for 10 minutes. –  Lawrence Dol Nov 3 '10 at 3:28
1  
@Software Monkey: I split the difference and just made it "less readable." :) –  Bill the Lizard Nov 3 '10 at 3:45

Um not trying to be a brick, but I think you tried to write:

public static void doAction(int i) {
    System.out.println("i = " + i);
}

public static void loopValues(int i, int j) {
    if (i > j) while (i >= j) doAction(i--);
    else       while (i <= j) doAction(i++);;
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    int start = 1, finish = 10;
    loopValues(start, finish);
    loopValues(finish, start);
}

Reason why you have 2 loops is efficiency and your case readability. Comparing is costly operation and you do not generally want to add extra compares to loop just to alter its normal course.

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2  
+1 for clarity. –  Kevin Stricker Nov 3 '10 at 4:17

Indeed the code is hard to follow... but enough with the critics. When someone ask for reusable methods where only the loop is different, the only thing that comes to mind is an Iterator. The iterator pattern is exactly what you need for this reusable case. If your wrap your iterator in an Iterable interface, then you can easily use it inside a for block. Example :

public class IntegerRange implements Iterable<Integer> {
   private boolean reverse;
   private int start;
   private int end;

   public IntegerRange(int start, int end) {
      this.reverse = (start > end);
      this.start = start;
      this.end = end;
   }

   @Override
   public Iterator<Integer> iterator() {
      return new IntegerIterator();
   }


   private class IntegerIterator implements Iterator<Integer> {

      private int current;

      private IntegerIterator() {
         current = start;
      }

      @Override
      public boolean hasNext() {
         if (reverse) {
            return (end <= current);
         } else {
            return (current <= end);
         }
      }

      @Override
      public Integer next() {
         if (!hasNext()) {
            throw new NoSuchElementException();
         }
         if (reverse) {
            return current--;
         } else {
            return current++;
         }
      }

      @Override
      public void remove() {
         throw new UnsupportedOperationException("Cannot remove from this iterator");
      }
   }

}

Then use and reuse your iterator...

static public void main(String...args) {
   doStuff(new IntegerRange(1, 10));
   doStuff(new IntegerRange(10, 1));
}

static private void doStuff(IntegerRange range) {
   for (int i : range) {
      System.out.println("i = " + i);
   }
} 

Code more readable now.

share|improve this answer
    
Ummm...You code is beyond my skills. I'm reading it, thinking wow... –  Joe's Morgue Nov 3 '10 at 23:25

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