Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a good way of implementing a fixed-size array in .NET that does not require unsafe code?

My goal is to create a value type which represents a fixed-size array which can be embedded (included as a member) in other types - i.e. I'm specifically hoping to avoid creating an array as a seperate object to the type which declares it.

I realize that .NET's implementation of arrays is superb and supported at CLR/CIL level - and don't really want to debate whether or not to just use arrays... the exploration here is to whether or not a safe, fixed-size, value type implementation is possible with almost as good efficiency.

share|improve this question
2  
Can you help me understand what benefit this provides that an ordinary array (declared within the type) cannot? It's hard to come up with an alternate implementation if I don't even know what the objective is. Is this about eliminating some of the objections to arrays outlined here?: blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2008/09/22/… –  Robert Harvey Nov 3 '10 at 3:32
1  
@Robert: The objective is to be able to have a fixed-size value-type array which can be used as a private member on other types. Consider a custom dictionary or linked-list implementation... the number of heap allocations can be reduced if each bucket/node is flattened to contain it's own, fixed-size array. –  Mark Nov 3 '10 at 3:52
add comment

2 Answers

The objective is to be able to have a fixed-size value-type array which can be used as a private member on other types. Consider a custom dictionary or linked-list implementation... the number of heap allocations can be reduced if each bucket/node is flattened to contain it's own, fixed-size array.

Making your array a value type does not necessarily mean it's going to be stored on the stack. In fact, if it's a value type embedded within a reference type, it's most likely going to be stored on the heap with the reference type, and not on the stack.

So making it a value type will not reduce heap allocations at all.

More info here: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2010/09/30/the-truth-about-value-types.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
Yup, this will end up on the heap. And he'll end up copying this 512 byte struct many times, no doubt. –  Hans Passant Nov 3 '10 at 11:11
2  
The idead behind this question was specifically aimed at embedding the struct into a class and having the struct allocated on the heap with the class. If implemented as a private member and used correctly, it should not be copied around many times. –  Mark Nov 4 '10 at 7:00
1  
...and it will reduce heap allocations since it now allocates just once (for the containing class) and not again for the array. –  Eamon Nerbonne Jun 22 '11 at 8:11
add comment

After some research using reflector, it turns out that the following represents an acceptable (performance-wise) solution, since C# compiles a switch statement against integers into a CIL switch statement, which is implemented as a jump-list... that is - the getter executes in about 11 CIL instructions, which it fine.

 public struct EmbeddedArray<T>
    {
        private T _element0;
        private T _element1;
        private T _element2;

        public int Length { get { return 3; } }


        public T this[int index]
        {
            get
            {
                switch (index)
                {
                    case 0:
                        return _element0;
                    case 1:
                        return _element1;
                    case 2:
                        return _element2;
                }
                throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("index");

            }
        }
    }

Please see Hans' comment below. It turns out that this is not as performant as I'd hoped... once the CIL is compiled to native machine code, the measured performance is far off what a .NET array will yield.

share|improve this answer
6  
Looking at IL is meaningless, only the machine code that the jitter generates is relevant. And this code should perform a lot worse than an array index. It has very poor cache locality due to the large jump table. And an almost guaranteed branch misprediction which are very expensive on modern cores. An array index has none of these problems. Profile it to see this, use real data. –  Hans Passant Nov 3 '10 at 10:59
1  
@Hans - Much respect, again, for your comment. Adfter doing a little profiling, it turns out that you're indeed correct... the IL switch statement was a little misleading. Also, the cost of allocating an array seperately from the class that uses it is a very inexpensive price to pay for the performance gains of an array. Thumbs up, Hans - I wish you'd posted an answer insterad of a comment - it would be the accepted answer here. –  Mark Nov 4 '10 at 6:56
    
The last paragraph in your question excluded the possibility of talking about the right answer. –  Hans Passant Nov 4 '10 at 7:11
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.