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I downloaded OpenSSL sources, and did the config, make, sudo make install trilogy.

I then built my project, linking in libcrypto.a and libssl.a, but got:

ld: warning: in /usr/local/ssl/lib/libcrypto.a, file was built for unsupported file format which is not the architecture being linked (x86_64)
ld: warning: in /usr/local/ssl/lib/libssl.a, file was built for unsupported file format which is not the architecture being linked (x86_64)

I'm pretty sure I want to re-build OpenSSL as 32-bit (i386), because (for reasons not pertinent to this question) my project needs to be 32-bit.

How do I build OpenSSL as 32-bit on Mac OS X? (I didn't see anything about this in the "INSTALL" file.)

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1  
In general on OS X, 64-bit Intel is called x86_64, 32-bit Intel i386 (see man arch). –  Ned Deily Nov 3 '10 at 17:06
    
Note, it turns out I didn't need to download and build OpenSSL on Mac OS X (10.6.4). My project built fine once I got the linker (-l) arguments correct. (I'm told the OpenSSL libs "bundled" with Mac OS X are a fat binary that includes all of x86_64, i386 and PPC builds. –  Daryl Spitzer Nov 4 '10 at 19:44
1  
That's correct, pretty much everything included with OS X is multi-arch universal. About the only reason to build your own OpenSSL is if you need a newer version. –  Ned Deily Nov 4 '10 at 20:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 15 down vote accepted
$ curl http://www.openssl.org/source/openssl-1.0.0a.tar.gz | tar xz
$ cd openssl-1.0.0a
$ export CFLAGS="-arch i386"
$ export LDFLAGS="-arch i386"
$ ./config
$ make
$ lipo -info libssl.a
input file libssl.a is not a fat file
Non-fat file: libssl.a is architecture: i386
$ lipo -info libcrypto.a
input file libcrypto.a is not a fat file
Non-fat file: libcrypto.a is architecture: i386
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