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The following sentences are a cause of confusion for me(from Guido's Tutorial on python.org):

"Note that comparing objects of different types is legal. The outcome is deterministic but arbitrary: the types are ordered by their name. Thus, a list is always smaller than a string, a string is always smaller than a tuple, etc."than a tuple, etc."

That means that for :

a=[90]
b=(1)
a<b

the result should be True. But it is not so! Can you help me out here?than a tuple, etc."

Also, what is meant by "The outcome is deterministic but arbitrary"?

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Also, what is meant by "The outcome is deterministic but arbitrary"? –  fixxxer Nov 3 '10 at 4:39
    
Please do not comment on a question you posted. Please update your question to be complete. Then delete your comment. –  S.Lott Nov 3 '10 at 10:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

(1) is an int. You probably meant (1,), which is a tuple.

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Also, what is meant by "The outcome is deterministic but arbitrary"? –  fixxxer Nov 3 '10 at 4:40
3  
@fixxxer: It means that given the same input you will get the same answer each time within the same execution run, but you should not depend on this property as it may change in the future. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Nov 3 '10 at 4:46
    
Thanks Ignacio. –  fixxxer Nov 3 '10 at 4:47
    
Actually no, the deterministic part means you will always get the same outcome (across execution runs and into the future, barring changes to the Python language)... arbitrary just means that there's no particular sense to the order, it's probably not useful to compare objects this way. –  Anentropic Oct 11 '11 at 11:27

Please note that you should not rely upon this behavior anymore. Some built-in types cannot be compared with other built-ins, and new data model provides a way to overload comparator functionality.

>>> set([1]) > [1]
Traceback (most recent call last):
   File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: can only compare to a set

Moreover, it was removed in py3k altogether:

>>> [1,2] > (3,4)
Traceback (most recent call last):
   File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: unorderable types: list() > tuple()
>>> [1,2] > "1,2"
Traceback (most recent call last):
   File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: unorderable types: list() > str()
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Thanks Ignacio. –  fixxxer Nov 3 '10 at 5:19

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