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Twitter limits each user account to 20 lists. I have three accounts with different purposes but need the 60 lists across these three accounts to be displayed on one page on my website. Each list link needs to be clickable to the status updates from that list (in that same page likely using ajax). They are private lists (created for viewing only in the app) and I would like to keep them that way though I will take them public if absolutely necessary.

I'm just the content manager asking this on behalf of the developer so I know little about oAuth but this is how it has been explained to me: "When you request an access token you send Twitter a current timestamp and that timestamp is used to make a signature_basestring. With that signature, you sign every request you send to Twitter. It's a bit tricky not to enter login/pass manually when Twitter asks you to do that."

The developer mentioned that even if we take the lists public, we would still need to use oauth/logins to retrieve status updates from the lists. What he proposed is doing the oauth/logins process behind the scenes periodically during the day (based on cron.php timer) and displaying cached messages to users of the app. My preference is to display in real-time assuming that I can get the other two accounts whitelisted. Only one of the accounts is whitelisted for 20,000 requests (per hour?).

So the advice I'm seeking is a bit open-ended as to how proceed from here. Private/public lists? Display real-time vs display cached version? Security concerns? The developer is still pretty new to the API so we're hoping someone can toss us a bone here. Thanks!

Summary (tl;dr)

I want to display links to 60 twitter lists across my 3 twitter accounts on one webpage and to make those list links clickable to the status updates from each list. How do I do this?

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Just for the record, you can see a snippet of your actual post on the questions page. I like (and so does Jon Skeet) to put my summary first so it shows up on the main page. Makes people more likely to click! –  Christopher Pfohl Nov 11 '10 at 17:54

1 Answer 1

Your developer is correct. Have to handle it on the backend. You have only need to authorize once for each account and get the OAuth token and secret and hardcode it since they will rarely change, if ever, for your different 3 accounts (no need to reauthorize). Can do that with twurl fairly easily.

If you can get the accounts whitelisted, then you can handle more realtime updates better (I would personally cache for something small like 5-20 seconds which is realtime enough without killing yourself if someone slams you with refreshes). But in all honesty, you get 350 API calls per hour without rate limiting. You can do one cache invalidation every 30 seconds and get by (as long as you are running something poll heavy on the accounts at the same time like Tweetdeck or Seesmic).

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Hi Zac, without much competition for the 50 reputation, I think I'll have to work you a bit here. 1) What is Twurl? I Googled & the first result was a Tweetburner site. 2) The api limit appears to be 150. I just discovered the Twitter dev console & found that I could test the rate limiting there & it spit out 150 at me instead of 20,000. Apparently, I was de-whitelisted at some point. –  Adam Nov 8 '10 at 17:55
    
Also, we made a few calls to the api that I know count against the rate limit but didn't decrease the 150 after we ran the console again. Strange. –  Adam Nov 8 '10 at 17:58

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