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In Mercurial I have an old changeset which is all good apart from the alterations to a single file. How would I revert the alterations to that single file?

Even just being able to view the state of the file at the previous changeset would be good then I could cut & paste.

My Mercurial client is TortoiseHg.

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6 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

As of TortoiseHg 2.8.1

  1. Commit in case something goes wrong
  2. Right click the revision you want to roll back to, select Browse At Revision
  3. Find the file you want to revert to this revision, right click, 'Revert to this revision (Ctrl+Shift+R)
  4. Repeat 3 for all files you want to revert
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Raghuram's answer is no longer correct due to stylistic(~) changes to TortoiseHG. "Repository Browser" has been renamed "TortoiseHG Workbench", but, more importantly, "Revert file contents" is no longer an action on the context menu.

As of version 2.0.4, you'll want to:

  1. Commit your current repository in case something goes wrong.
  2. Open the relevant changeset in "TortoiseHG Explorer"
  3. In the file listing, right-click on the file you which to revert.
  4. Select "Revert to Revision" from the context menu.
  5. You'll be presented with a confirmation dialog that contains a checkbox labeled "Revert all files to this revision". Make sure that it's unchecked.
  6. Hit "OK".
  7. Verify that only that file was reverted. If everything was reverted, update to the revision created in step 1.

The first time I tried this, I'm not sure what I did wrong, but I reverted the whole repository instead of the single file. So, definitely make sure you commit a new revision before trying it.

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It reverts to this revision, but doesn't revert the change in the revision itself. Very inconvenient. –  Dmitry Osinovskiy Sep 16 '12 at 11:47
    
I'm not quite sure what you're looking for. Maybe you're wanting to revert to the revision before that? –  Brian Geppert Sep 19 '12 at 18:56
    
Yes, I want to revert half of some commit, say, several files. This means that I want to revert them to revisions that they had before this commit. So I have to look in each file's history, find revision before my commit and revert it separately. 10 files and you hate HG. –  Dmitry Osinovskiy Sep 20 '12 at 10:30
    
If you want to make a separate question I'll answer it. ;) –  Brian Geppert Sep 21 '12 at 15:58
    
Yeah, this didn't work well for me. I think the interface has changed some, but I managed to revert the whole codebase even though it said it was only for one file. –  Tom Jan 17 '13 at 15:16
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Open Repository Browser, go to the interested changeset. You will see a list of changed files. Choose the file you are intersted and Click on Revert file contents

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I've discovered the answer to the second part at least. To view the contents of a single file at an old revision do the following in TortoiseHg:

  1. Right click on the file and select repository explorer.
  2. Click on the revision you'd like to revert back to.
  3. Right click on the file in the bottom left pane. Select either view at revision or save at revison.
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To view an old version of a file using TortoiseHg (as of version 2.2.1), open TortoiseHG Workbench, right click on an old rev, and click "Browse at rev..."

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CLI-version, applicable to any (fresh) version of TortoiseHG

In order to undo changes only in FILE, introduced in changeset CSET, use this form of backout

hg backout -r CSET --include FILE

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I'm not sure this would do what I want. I think this would revert alterations for a file in a specific changeset. I'd like to revert a file back to exactly how it was in a specific changeset, ignoring all subsequent changsets. –  Giles Roberts Jan 9 '13 at 12:29
    
Works perfectly –  Pykler Jul 24 '13 at 19:45
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