Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here are the facts:

  • We have a lot (L O T) of data coming in everyday.
  • Each file we receive is in a csv format and while there are a couple of headers that reoccur more often than others, there is not really a standard.
  • The normalization of each file to be uploaded into a mySQL database is highly time consuming and often pushes us to change the schema (new field appeared in on file that was not existing before..).
  • While the primary key is unique, anything else can be duplicated
  • These are customers records (i.e.: email,firstname,lastname,city,state,address...etc)
  • We could have multiple emails for the same individual ..
  • We read 70% of the time and we write 30% of the time
  • Scalability could be a concern but it is not right now, though availability is key
  • Speed is what we are looking for. Mysql is too slow to answer queries where tables are over 50 million records. Even well optimized we have too many speed issue. Breaking down the tables has become an organizational concern. Schema less noSQL seemed attractive. What would you recommend, what did you implement? (Please do not answer to optimize mysql .. pointless and off topic)

--

share|improve this question
    
why are your queries taking so long with such a small number of rows 50+ million ? can you post some more info ??? –  f00 Nov 3 '10 at 11:47
    
I've used tables of over 300 million records and it was blazing fast! I think you have problems with your indexing or your queries. Also note that MySQL is much faster if you disable all of the transactional stuff. We use to compile it out, but I think some table formats may do the same. –  Jeach Feb 1 '12 at 20:55

1 Answer 1

Let's go over the points:

We have a lot (L O T) of data coming in everyday.

NoSQL solutions are basically all created to scale to large numbers (Riak, MongoDB, Cassandra, etc.)

... headers that reoccur more often than others, there is not really a standard... The normalization of each file to be uploaded into a mySQL database is highly time consuming and often pushes us to change the schema

NoSQL definitely fits this model many of them are "schema-less" so it's easy to store those extra fields. This will however cost you extra space as the field names are typically stored with the document.

While the primary key is unique, anything else can be duplicated

"Document-oriented" and "Key-Value" databases are a good fit for this as long as the key is provided. If you have to run duplicate checks, then most key-value database are ill-equipped. The "document-oriented" database might be slightly better equipped, but not by much.

We could have multiple emails for the same individual

Most of these databases have some notion of "arrays as a basic type". CouchDB and MongoDB both store objects as JSON, so it's easy to see how a customer could have an array of e-mails without the need for a "join table". MongoDB also provides "atomic update" features like "$addToSet" that plays nicely with arrays.

We read 70% of the time and we write 30% of the time Scalability could be a concern but it is not right now, though availability is key

The major NoSQL DBs are all designed to scale. (both reads and writes)

The only way to availability is through hardware and locational redundancy (no different that MySQL or other databases). Despite their low version numbers, many of these Databases are being used in production environments by very big companies, so many of the simple cases are covered. It's still virgin territory, but we're also past the "randomly crashes when nothing has changed" phase.

Speed is what we are looking for... Schema less noSQL seemed attractive. What would you recommend, what did you implement?

We have 100s of M of flexible user records in MongoDB. Performance on individual seeks is really awesome.

However, you have to wary about the type of queries you're running.

If you need to run queries that bring back several Users at once, you're going to have speed issues with basically any of these Key-Value or Document-Oriented database. You may want to look at Graph database or some other fancy solution. However, if your use cases all center around one user at a time then take a look at MongoDB.

MongoDB also supports native map-reduce so you'll be able to scale "non-real time" queries.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.