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Is it a good practice to introduce a TestSettings class in order to provide flexible testing possibilities of a method that has many processes inside?

Maybe not a good example but can be simple: Suppose that I have this method and I want to test its sub-processes:

public void TheBigMethod(myMethodParameters parameter)
{

  if(parameter.Condition1)
   {
     MethodForCondition1("BigMac"); 
   }

  if(parameter.Condition2)
   {
     MethodForCondition2("MilkShake"); 
   }

  if(parameter.Condition3)
   {
     MethodForCondition3("Coke"); 
   }

  SomeCommonMethod1('A');
  SomeCommonMethod2('B');
  SomeCommonMethod3('C');
}

And imagine that I have unit tests for all

  • void MethodForCondition1 (string s)
  • void MethodForCondition2 (string s)
  • void MethodForCondition3 (string s)
  • void SomeCommonMethod1 (char c)
  • void SomeCommonMethod2 (char c)
  • void SomeCommonMethod3 (char c)

And now i want to test the TheBigMethod itself by introducing such test methods with required Asserts in them:

  • TheBigMethod_MethodForCondition1_TestCaseX_DoesGood
  • TheBigMethod_MethodForCondition2_TestCaseY_DoesGood
  • TheBigMethod_MethodForCondition3_TestCaseZ_DoesGood
  • TheBigMethod_SomeCommonMethod1_TestCaseU_DoesGood
  • TheBigMethod_SomeCommonMethod2_TestCaseP_DoesGood
  • TheBigMethod_SomeCommonMethod3_TestCaseQ_DoesGood

So, I want TheBigMethod to be exit-able at some points if it is called by one of my integration tests above.

public void TheBigMethod(myMethodParameters parameter, TestSettings setting)
{

  if(parameter.Condition1)
   {
     MethodForCondition1("BigMac"); 

     if(setting.ExitAfter_MethodForCondition1)
        return;

   }

  if(parameter.Condition2)
   {
     MethodForCondition2("MilkShake"); 

     if(setting.ExitAfter_MethodForCondition2)
        return;

   }

  if(parameter.Condition3)
   {
     MethodForCondition3("Coke"); 

     if(setting.ExitAfter_MethodForCondition3)
        return;

   }

  SomeCommonMethod1('A');
  if(setting.ExitAfter_SomeCommonMethod1)
       return;

  SomeCommonMethod2('B');
  if(setting.ExitAfter_SomeCommonMethod2)
       return;

  SomeCommonMethod3('C');
  if(setting.ExitAfter_SomeCommonMethod3)
       return;
}

Even though it looks it does what I need to introduce a TestSetting parameter can makee the code less readable and does not look nice to have testing logic and the main functionality combined to me.

Can you advise a better design for such cases so that it can replace a TestSetting parameter idea?

thanks

share|improve this question
    
In TDD, you write tests in order to help and achieve the correct design (that is, test first). You seem to be writing tests after you already have a design - this is not TDD. – Oded Nov 3 '10 at 10:06
1  
Why do you need to exit the method earlier? – Stefan Steinegger Nov 3 '10 at 10:09
    
@Oded: Correct. Thanks for highlighting it. Actually I came up with this question when I was given a legacy code that has no tests. Anyway, do you have an opinion or advise on my question? I would appreciate. – pencilCake Nov 3 '10 at 10:10
    
@StefanSteinegger: Because if it passes, I dont want to test the rest of the processes -talking on this example. Let's say, if the BIG method has to complete steps A,B,C,D,E,F. I want to test the steps in the BIG method first only A. Then in another test from A to B. And then A,B,C. And then A,B,C,D. Until I get GREEN light for A to F. – pencilCake Nov 3 '10 at 10:13
    
Adding a TestSettings parameter would really be my very last resort. Can't you stub the method calls you don't need? I would even prefer adding a parameter object that holds the methods to be called to adding a TestSettings parameter. – Lieven Keersmaekers Nov 3 '10 at 10:23
up vote 2 down vote accepted

It would (IMO) be a very bad thing to add this TestSetting. An alternative would be to add an interface (or set of interfaces) for MethodForConditionX and SomeCommonMethodX. The test each of the MethodForConditionX & SomeCommonMethodX in isolation and pass in a stub for TheBigMethod which validates that MethodForConditionX is called with value Z.

Edit: You could also make the methods virtual if you don't want to use an interface.

share|improve this answer
    
So maybe for all the processes that will be accomplished, I can introduce a IBigMehtodManager interface that has public methods for all processes (MethodForConditionX and SomeCommonMethodX) and I can create stub in my tests that implements IBigMethodManager Basicaly I replacec BigMehtodManager class with a stub TestableBigMethodManager : IBigMethodManager. – pencilCake Nov 3 '10 at 10:27
    
so in the end the method signature will be like this----> public void TheBigMethod(myMethodParameters parameter, IBigMethodManager manager) – pencilCake Nov 3 '10 at 10:28
    
I would likely inject the "IBigMethodManager" into the class rather than just that method (unless TheBigMethod is static). But that is the general idea. – mlk Nov 3 '10 at 10:46

A bit late to the game here, but I would concur that mixing test and production code is a big code smell to be avoided. Big methods in legacy code provide all sorts of issues. I would highly recommend reading Michael Feather's Working Effectively with Legacy Code. It's all about dealing with the myriad of problems encountered in legacy code and how to deal with them.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the pointing to this book. I have added to my list already. – pencilCake Nov 4 '10 at 8:27

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