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I have a question.

class A
{
    static void m1()
    {
       int x=10;
    }
}

class B
{
    // if i want to access the variable x in b class how can i access it 

    A a = new A();
    // a. what should i write here to access x variable
}
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by jalf, Neil Knight, abatishchev, Alastair Pitts, leppie Nov 3 '10 at 11:28

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
What is "call A"? Not valid C#, certainly. – jalf Nov 3 '10 at 11:21
    
i want to know how can i access some public methods variable in some other class or in the same class – NoviceToDotNet Nov 3 '10 at 11:23
    
or mehods variables have scop limited to the methods only so we can not access them.... – NoviceToDotNet Nov 3 '10 at 11:24
    
I want to know what "call" means. – jalf Nov 3 '10 at 11:24
    
You cannot access a variable declared in a method from any other place than the method itself. It is scoped within the method. If you want the variable to be accessible from outsede the method you need to make it a class level field. – Nivas Nov 3 '10 at 11:26
up vote 2 down vote accepted

In order to access x you must make it a field on A:

class A
{
    public int X;
}
class B
{
    static void Main()
    {
        A a = new A();
        a.X = 17;
    }
}

However it is generally bad practice to expose public fields from a class - it is better to wrap the field in a property to encapsulate it:

class A
{
    int _x;
    public int X
    {
        get { return _x; }
        set { _x = value; }
    }
}

If this syntax seems cumbersome you can simplify it a bit. C# has a feature called automatically implemented properties in which the compiler will generate the code above for you if you do this:

class A
{
    public int X { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
sir what is default type for property, is it private or public? – NoviceToDotNet Nov 3 '10 at 11:37
    
By default all members on a class are private. – Andrew Hare Nov 3 '10 at 13:26

It should be either property or a public variable.

share|improve this answer
    
are properties always public or we hav to explicitly declare them public and by default they are private? – NoviceToDotNet Nov 3 '10 at 16:45
    
Please read this link stackoverflow.com/questions/653536/… – PradeepGB Nov 4 '10 at 6:34

First, when asking a question, please spend just 30 seconds trying to get it right. Your code is nonsense.

call isn't a valid keyword in C#. Did you mean class? Or something else? Second, is it unreasonable to ask you to run the text through a spell checker? None of us are getting paid to answer your questions, we're doing it for free, in our own free time. So if you want answers, make it easy for us to understand and answer your questions. Don't be lazy at our expense, because then we'll be lazy too, and ignore your question.

Now, as I understand your question, you can't. x is a local variable declared inside the function. It's not visible anywhere else.

share|improve this answer
    
ok sir i am sorry, i will do the same told by you ...thanks for our answer – NoviceToDotNet Nov 3 '10 at 11:25
    class Class1
    {
        public int x;

        public void M1()
        {
            x = 10;
        }

    }

class ClassB
{

void Method()
{
    Class1 a = new Class1();
    a.M1();
    a.x = 5;
    //at this point the x will contain 5
}
}

The exmaple uses instance variables , not static.

To access static variables you must have a static method M1 then in ClassB you access the x variable usign the class name not the object name, like this:

Class1.x = 5;

Variable x1 must also be declared as static like: public static x = 10;

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