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 class Song < ActiveRecord::Base
    # Uses an integer of seconds to hold the length of the song

    def length=(minutes)
      write_attribute(:length, minutes.to_i * 60)
    end

    def length
      read_attribute(:length) / 60
    end
  end

This is an easy example by rails api doc.

Is it possible overwrite all attributes for a model without overwrite each one?

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2 Answers 2

Do you look for something like that? Don't know why you would want to do it, but here you go :)

class Song < ActiveRecord::Base

  self.columns_hash.keys.each do |name|
    define_method :"#{name}=" do
      # set
    end

    define_method :"#{name}" do
      # get
    end

    # OR

    class_eval(<<-METHOD, __FILE__, __LINE__ + 1)
       def #{name}=
         # set
       end

       def #{name}
         # get
       end
    METHOD

  end

end
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In the case, I have a table with fields that stores internationalized content (title, title_portuguse, title_english), then I wanna modify the behaviour of this methods to display data according to language without modify the views. –  Lucas Renan Nov 3 '10 at 14:01
1  
You might take a look at the globalize2 plugin, which makes it possible to use localized attributes like content.title. I do not really like their approach. They essentially create a content_translations table where all translated attributes are columns and then load translation records matching I18n.locale. content.title then becomes a proxy to content.translation(locale).title. In my next localized application I will skip the plugin and just create those tables by hand and create a ContentTranslation model. It is more clear and you know what kind of object you're dealing with. –  balu Nov 3 '10 at 14:10

I'm not sure of a use case where this would be a good idea. However, all rails models dynamically have their properties assigned to them (assuming it isn't already in the class). The answer is partially in your question.

You can override the read_attribute() and write_attribute() methods. That would apply your transformations to every attribute whether they were written to by the accessor or populated in bulk in the controller. Just be careful to not mutate important attributes like the 'id' attribute.

Ruby has a shortcut that is used in rails code a fair bit that can help you. It's the %w keyword. %w will create an array of words based on the symbols inside the parentheses. Because it's an array you can do useful things like this:

@excludes = %w(id, name)

def read_attribute name
    value = super
    if(not @excludes.member? name)
        value = value.to_i * 60
    end

    value
end

def write_attribute name, value
    if(not @excludes.member? name)
        value = value.to_i / 60
    end

    super
end

That should get you started. There are more advanced constructs like using lambdas, etc. Keep in mind you should write some thorough unit tests to make sure you don't have any unintended consequences. You may have to include more attribute names in the list of excludes.

edit: (read|write)_attributes -> (read|write)_attribute

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I think (read|write)_attribute is used internally by AR. It's common to override accessors so I guess that's more safe. I'd be interested to know if it works though. –  balu Nov 3 '10 at 14:10
    
It is the only mechanism that takes care of all paths of managing the attributes. I.e. when you do @post = Post.new(params[:post]), edit the attribute directly or do @post.update_attributes(params[:post]). It used to be the way to do things like this for that reason. Not sure if it has changed in the newer versions. –  Berin Loritsch Nov 3 '10 at 16:15

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