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Can someone provide me a regex for SSN that matches either

123-45-6789

OR

XXX-XX-XXXX

I currently have ^\d{3}-?\d{2}-?\d{4}$ which matches the first expression, but I need to add the second expression to it as an alternative.

Thanks!

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solution with unit tests regex101.com/r/rP8wL0/1 – The Muffin Man May 11 at 18:44
up vote 25 down vote accepted

(^\d{3}-?\d{2}-?\d{4}$|^XXX-XX-XXXX$) should do it.

---- EDIT ----

As Joel points out you could also do ^(\d{3}-?\d{2}-?\d{4}|XXX-XX-XXXX)$ which is a little neater.

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3  
I'd abstract out the ^$ part,but this should work. – Joel Coehoorn Nov 3 '10 at 13:29
    
I figured it would be something trivial, I'm just not that familiar with regex rules. Thanks! – Chris Conway Nov 3 '10 at 13:41
    
@Chris Conway : I can't recommend the O'Reilly book Mastering Regular Expressions by Jeffrey E F Friedl enough, also the regex tool Expresso (ultrapico.com/Expresso.htm) is awesome too. – Lazarus Nov 5 '10 at 10:17
    
FWIW, the original answer above worked for me, but the EDIT answer did not. This was in the context of a jquery validator. Not sure why the second didn't work. – Kirk Liemohn Jun 24 '14 at 14:15
    
Gotta add that regex101.com is an incredible tool as well – TheH Apr 13 '15 at 20:00

To strictly answer you question:

^(123-45-6789|XXX-XX-XXXX)$

shoud work. ;-)

If you read the section "Valid SSNs" on Wikipedia`s SSN article then it becomes clear that a regex for SSN validation is a bit more complicated.

Accordingly a little bit more accurate pure SSN regex would look like this:

^(?!(000|666|9))\d{3}-(?!00)\d{2}-(?!0000)\d{4}$
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+1 for the link. – jensgram Nov 3 '10 at 13:51
    
thanks a lot helpful – rOcKiNg RhO Dec 6 '12 at 7:27
1  
As I write this comment, this answer was last edited Nov. 3 of 2010. However, the referenced Wikipedia article states that SSN validation has changed on June 25 2011, allowing more numbers in more places. – Chris May 5 '13 at 22:10
    
want to add here, in case someone is concerned with the SSN changes, to keep in mind those changes do only apply to NEW assigned SSNs... as in if someone receives his SSN for the first time, meaning everyone 4 years old and younger will have this new one and immigrants, residents or temp. residents. everyone who moved to or was born before 2011 has the old format. – Tobias Jul 28 '15 at 10:55
    
Figured it out. To match either xxx-xx-xxxx or xxxxxxxxx you'd just have to alternate between two patterns with or without the dashes. ^(?!(000|666|9))\d{3}-(?!00)\d{2}-(?!0000)\d{4}$|^(?!(000|666|9))\d{3}(?!00)\d{‌​2}(?!0000)\d{4}$ – The Muffin Man May 10 at 15:19

So you currently have: ^\d{3}-?\d{2}-?\d{4}$

What you need is to allow any of those numeric blocks to be "X"s instead. This is also fairly simple as a regex - just adapt your existing one to have X instead of \d in each of the three places it occurs: X{3}-?X{2}-?X{4}

You won't want to be combining a numeric code with and X code, so you just need to allow either one case or the other, so wrap them up in brackets and us a pipe character to specify one or the other, like so:

^((\d{3}-?\d{2}-?\d{4})|(X{3}-?X{2}-?X{4}))$

You'll probably also want to allow upper- or lower-case X. This can be specified using [Xx] or by making the whole thing case insensitive, using the i modifier outside the regex.

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Then it can be

/^[\dX]{3}-?[\dX]{2}-?[\dX]{4}$/

if you want x to be valid too, you can add the i modifier to the end:

/^[\dX]{3}-?[\dX]{2}-?[\dX]{4}$/i

On second thought, the regex above will accept

123-xx-xxxx

as well, so depending on whether you want this form to be accepted or not, you can use your original form "or" the other form:

/^(\d{3}-?\d{2}-?\d{4})|(xxx-xx-xxxx)$/i
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1  
you gonna have 1X3-XXX-4451 string valid – Andrew Nov 3 '10 at 13:30
    
For example 12XX0-123X will also match. Probably not what was intended. – Michael Kjörling Nov 3 '10 at 13:32
    
oh ha, we were entering the text at the same time – 太極者無極而生 Nov 3 '10 at 13:32

A more generic match would be:

(^[^-]{3}-?[^-]{3}-?[^-]{4}$)

This would match any sequence of characters other than "-" in 3-3-4 char configuration. For example:

my @str = qw/
  1adfasdfa
  adsfaouaosd90890
  111-232-adafd
  xXX-232-1234
  111-222-4444
  $$%-AF#-131@
/;

foreach(@str)
{
  print "$_\n" if /^[^-]{3}-?[^-]{3}-?[^-]{4}$/;
}
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^\d{3}-?\d{2}-?\d{4}$|^XXX-XX-XXXX$

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