Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm fairly new to SQL, and I'm trying to work out how to speed up a complex SQL query in postgres, perhaps by improving my use of indexes. This is the query:

SELECT
    (SELECT ev.code FROM classification_item ci, enumeration_value ev
        WHERE ev.key_id = :ak_0
        AND ci.entry_id = t.id AND ci.value_id = ev.id) AS axis_0,
    (SELECT ev.code FROM classification_item ci, enumeration_value ev
        WHERE ev.key_id = :ak_1
        AND ci.entry_id = t.id AND ci.value_id = ev.id) AS axis_1,
    SUM(t.amount) as amount,
    (SELECT ev.code FROM classification_item ci, enumeration_value ev
        WHERE ev.key_id = :key_time_id
        AND ci.entry_id = t.id AND ci.value_id = ev.id) AS time
FROM "entry" t
WHERE t.dataset_id = :dataset_id
AND t.id IN (SELECT ci.entry_id FROM classification_item ci, enumeration_value ev
    WHERE ev.key_id = :k_0
    AND ev.code = :v_0 AND ci.value_id = ev.id)
GROUP BY time, axis_0, axis_1

This is basically the database schema (as defined in Pylons):

table_dataset = Table('dataset', meta.metadata,
    Column('id', Integer, primary_key=True),
    )
table_entry = Table('entry', meta.metadata,
    Column('id', Integer, primary_key=True),
    Column('dataset_id', Integer, ForeignKey('dataset.id')),
    Column('amount', Float()),
    )
table_classification_item = Table('classification_item', meta.metadata,
    Column('id', Integer, primary_key=True),
    Column('entry_id', Integer, ForeignKey('entry.id'), index=True),
    Column('value_id', Integer, ForeignKey('enumeration_value.id'), index=True)
)
table_enumeration_value = Table('enumeration_value', meta.metadata,
    Column('id', Integer, primary_key=True),
    Column('key_id', Integer, ForeignKey('key.id'), index=True),
    Column('code', UnicodeText(), index=True),
    )

And it has indexes as follows:

"dataset_pkey" PRIMARY KEY, btree (id)
"entry_pkey" PRIMARY KEY, btree (id)
"classification_item_pkey" PRIMARY KEY, btree (id)
"ix_classification_item_entry_id" btree (entry_id)
"ix_classification_item_value_id" btree (value_id)
"enumeration_value_pkey" PRIMARY KEY, btree (id)
"ix_enumeration_value_code" btree (code)
"ix_enumeration_value_key_id" btree (key_id)

Am I missing any obvious index that would speed up the query? In particular:

  • should I be using 'clustered' indexes?
  • should I also be indexing amount on entry, or would that make no difference to SUM(t.amount) as amount?

Thanks for your help. I know this is a pretty complex question, so please tell me if I can do anything to improve it.

------ UPDATE --------------

The output from EXPLAIN ANALYZE on the above query.

share|improve this question
    
would be helpful if you post the explain plan –  J-16 SDiZ Nov 3 '10 at 13:48
1  
As a rule you should always have clustered indexes. There are some rare exceptions but they are really rare. –  JNK Nov 3 '10 at 13:50
    
Sorry, I think I'm a bit confused about what a 'clustered' index actually is. Are the indexes I have above actually clustered? I was wondering if I could create a 'joint' index on two keys at once... –  AP257 Nov 3 '10 at 14:10
    
1  
@AP257: did you read the link? Clustering is a one-time operation: when the table is subsequently updated, the changes are not clustered. That is, no attempt is made to store new or updated rows according to their index order. CLUSTER reorders a heap-based table according to an index, but does not maintain the order, and the table remains heap-based. –  Quassnoi Nov 3 '10 at 16:39
show 6 more comments

2 Answers

If the enumeration_value table is small, I guess you can get some improvment by making axis_1 and axis_0 as join and add an extra index.

something like this (not tested)

CREATE INDEX idx_ci_vi_ei ON classification_item(value_id, entry_id);

CREATE INDEX idx_id_ki ON enumeration_value(id, key_id);

SELECT
    ci_0.code AS axis_0,
    ci_1.code AS axis_1,
    SUM(t.amount) as amount,
    ci_t.code AS time
FROM 
   "entry" t,
   (SELECT ev.code FROM classification_item ci, enumeration_value ev
        WHERE ev.key_id = :ak_0 AND ci.value_id = ev.id) ci_0,
   (SELECT ev.code FROM classification_item ci, enumeration_value ev
        WHERE ev.key_id = :ak_1 AND ci.value_id = ev.id) ci_1,
   (SELECT ev.code FROM classification_item ci, enumeration_value ev
        WHERE ev.key_id = :key_time_id AND ci.value_id = ev.id) ci_t
WHERE t.dataset_id = :dataset_id 
AND t.id IN (SELECT ci.entry_id FROM classification_item ci, enumeration_value ev
    WHERE ev.key_id = :k_0
    AND ev.code = :v_0 AND ci.value_id = ev.id)
AND t.id = ci_0.entry_id AND t.id = ci_1.entry_id AND t.id = ci_t.entry_id
GROUP BY time, axis_0, axis_1
share|improve this answer
    
enumeration_value is large, alas... so are entry and classification_item. only dataset and key are small. –  AP257 Nov 3 '10 at 14:25
    
the second CREATE INDEX may still works. give it a try –  J-16 SDiZ Nov 3 '10 at 15:50
add comment

What has EXPLAIN ANALYZE to say about the queryplan?

share|improve this answer
    
Ah OK, I've added this - see the update in the question. –  AP257 Nov 3 '10 at 14:18
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.