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How can this if-statement be simplified? It makes a plus sign: http://i.stack.imgur.com/PtHO1.png

If the statement is completed, then a block is set at the x and y coordinates.

for y in range(MAP_HEIGHT):
    for x in range(MAP_WIDTH):
        if (x%5 == 2 or x%5 == 3 or x%5 == 4) and \
            (y%5 == 2 or y%5 == 3 or y%5 == 4) and \
            not(x%5 == 2 and y%5 == 2) and \
            not(x%5 == 4 and y%5 == 2) and \
            not(x%5 == 2 and y%5 == 4) and \
            not(x%5 == 4 and y%5 == 4):
            ...
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Maybe I didn't explain well enough. A block is set at the x and y coordinates where the if statement is completed. –  Azrathud Nov 3 '10 at 15:01
2  
Please don't add comments. Please update the question to be complete. Please fix the question and delete the comment. –  S.Lott Nov 3 '10 at 15:24
    
I'm pretty sure you could condense this a lot by using some smart slicing, but I'm a bit too lazy to work it out. –  Daenyth Nov 3 '10 at 18:21
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6 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

This is the same:

if (x % 5 == 3 and y % 5 > 1) or (y % 5 == 3 and x % 5 > 1): 
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1  
Damn, you win. ;-) But please remove the redundant parentheses. –  Konrad Rudolph Nov 3 '10 at 14:45
1  
Unless I'm mistaken, the OP's statement doesn't draw the block for e.g. x = 1; y = 3. –  Iain Galloway Nov 3 '10 at 14:50
    
@Iain Galloway - good point - have fixed it now. –  Dave Webb Nov 3 '10 at 14:51
    
Hehe. This fairly awesome. –  Azrathud Nov 3 '10 at 15:15
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Basically you're tiling a 5x5 binary pattern. Here's a clear expression of that:

pattern = [[0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
           [0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
           [0, 0, 0, 1, 0],
           [0, 0, 1, 1, 1],
           [0, 0, 0, 1, 0]]

for y in range(MAP_HEIGHT):
    for x in range(MAP_WIDTH):
        if pattern[x%5][y%5]:
           ...

This is a very simple and general approach which would allow the pattern to be easily modified.

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There are two trivial fixes:

  • Cache the result of x % 5 and y % 5
  • Use in or chained < to test the values:

Additionally, the test for <= 4 (or < 5) is actually redundant because every value of lx and ly will be < 5.

for y in range(MAP_HEIGHT):
    for x in range(MAP_WIDTH):
        lx = x % 5 # for local-x
        ly = y % 5 # for local-y
        if lx > 1 and y > 1 and \
           not (lx == 2 and ly == 2) and \
           not (lx == 4 and ly == 2) and \
           not (lx == 2 and ly == 4) and \
           not (lx == 4 and ly == 4):

Or you may just keep a list of the actually allowed tuples:

cross_fields = [(2, 3), (3, 2), (3, 3), (3, 4), (4, 3)]

for y in range(MAP_HEIGHT):
    for x in range(MAP_WIDTH):
        if (x % 5, y % 5) in cross_fields:
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1  
Wow. You made it so.. readable and I didn't think of using lists/tuples at all. Both of them work, except the first clip of code has a few mistakes. The last coupled conditional statements should be not (lX == 4 and lY == 4) and there should be a lX != 0 and lY != 0. –  Azrathud Nov 3 '10 at 15:04
    
@Azrathud: I actually find Dave’s answer somewhat better. Anyway, thanks for the corrections. –  Konrad Rudolph Nov 3 '10 at 15:06
    
I think that using the tuples is the way to go. Not only it's cleaner what it does, but it is also more flexible. –  Tamás Szelei Nov 4 '10 at 10:16
    
@Daniel Roseman, & @Iain Galloway: This solution and the others that use the in operator all suffer from the fact that their doing a linear searche through a sequence of modulo coordinates for each x and y. If you're going to do it this way it would generally be better and faster to use a set whose keys were tuples of (x%5,y%5). That way, regardless of whether this set was constructed from the original or an optimized if statement, a bitmap pattern, or from an explicit list or tuple of coordinates, the resulting statement would be just if (x%5,y%5) in setvar:. –  martineau Nov 19 '10 at 19:59
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Building on Konrad's answer, you can simplify it further:

for y in range(MAP_HEIGHT):
    for x in range(MAP_WIDTH):
        lx = x % 5 # for local-x
        ly = y % 5 # for local-y
        if (1 < lx < 5 and 1 < y < 5 and 
           (lx, ly) not in ((2, 2), (4, 2), (2, 4), (4, 2))):
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I don't think that list of tuples is correct. Should it not be (2,3), (3,3), (4,3), (3,2), and (3,4)? (Or wait, did you just miss a not?) –  Iain Galloway Nov 3 '10 at 14:55
    
Yes, missed a not, added it back in. –  Daniel Roseman Nov 3 '10 at 15:07
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Konrad's second answer:-

cross_fields = [(2, 3), (3, 2), (3, 3), (3, 4), (4, 3)]

for y in range(MAP_HEIGHT):
  for x in range(MAP_WIDTH):
    if (x % 5, y % 5) in cross_fields:

is probably the best one.

However, I'll contribute:-

for y in range(MAP_HEIGHT):
  for x in range(MAP_WIDTH):
    lx = x % 5
    ly = y % 5
    if (lx > 1 and ly == 3) or (ly > 1 and lx == 3):
share|improve this answer
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The general solution to optimizing a logic function like this is a Karnaugh map. Your truth table would be the literal plus shape you want with rows and columns being your modular tests.

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Ah. So similar to martineau's answer? –  Azrathud Nov 4 '10 at 6:06
    
The first step would be similar, but the Karnaugh map is a technique for distilling the minimum logic expression necessary to cover the cases. –  Ben Jackson Nov 4 '10 at 6:44
    
(& @Iain Galloway): The bitmap used in my answer is basically a K-map of two input variables (x%5 and y%5) -- so, yes, the result would be the same as my answer but was arrived at in a completely different (and simpler IMHO) way. –  martineau Nov 19 '10 at 20:15
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