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I'm having some issues in RoR with some model methods I am setting. I'm trying to build a method on one model, with an argument that gets supplied a default value (nil). The ideal is that if a value is passed to the method, it will do something other than the default behavior. Here is the setup:

I currently have four models: Market, Deal, Merchant, and BusinessType

Associations look like this:

class Deal
  belongs_to :market
  belongs_to :merchant
end

class Market
  has_many :deals
  has_many :merchants
end

class Merchant
  has_many :deals
  belongs_to :market
  belongs_to :business_type
end

class BusinessType
  has_many :merchants
  has_many :deals, :through => :merchants
end

I am trying to pull some data based on Business Type (I have greatly simplified the return, for the sake of brevity):

class BusinessType
  def revenue(market=nil)
    if market.nil?
      return self.deals.sum('price')
    else
      return self.deals(:conditions => ['market_id = ?',market]).sum('price')
    end
  end
end

So, if I do something like:

puts BusinessType.first.revenue

I get the expected result, that is the sum of the price of all deals associated with that business type. However, when I do this:

puts BusinessType.first.revenue(1)

It still returns the sum price of all deals, NOT the sum price of all deals from market 1. I've also tried:

puts BusinessType.first.revenue(market=1)

Also with no luck.

What am I missing?

Thanks!

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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try this:

class BusinessType
  def revenue(market=nil)
    if market.nil?
      return self.deals.all.sum(&:price)
    else
      return self.deals.find(:all, :conditions => ['market_id = ?',market]).sum(&:price)
    end
  end
end

That should work for you, or at least it did for some basic testing I did first.

As I have gathered, this is because the sum method being called is on enumerable, not the sum method from ActiveRecord as you might have expected.

Note: I just looked a bit further, and noticed you can still use your old code with a smaller tweak than the one I noted:

class BusinessType
  def revenue(market=nil)
    if market.nil?
      return self.deals.sum('price')
    else
      return self.deals.sum('price', :conditions => ['market_id = ?', market])
    end
  end
end
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Try this!

class BusinessType
  def revenue(market=nil)
    if market.nil?
      return self.deals.sum(:price)
    else
      return self.deals.sum(:price,:conditions => ['market_id = ?',market])
    end
  end
end

You can refer this link for other functions. http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Ruby_on_Rails/ActiveRecord/Calculations

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