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DELETE is supposed to be idempotent.

If I DELETE http://example.com/account/123 it's going to delete the account.

If I do it again would I expect a 404, since the account no longer exists? What if I attempt to DELETE an account that has never existed?

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In addition to the answers, I'd suggest not to focus too much on the idempotent characteristic in general: it doesn't say anything about commutativity and concurrent requests. For example N+1 of the same "R1" PUT request should have the same effect, but you don't know if another client made a different PUT/DELETE "R2" request in between yours, so while n*R1=R1 and m*R2=R2, something where you get interleaved "R1" and "R2" requests won't necessarily "look" idempotent if you only take the perspective of a single client. –  Bruno Nov 3 '10 at 15:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 70 down vote accepted

Idempotence refers to the state of the system after the request has completed


In all cases (apart from the error issues - see below), the account no longer exists.

From here

"Methods can also have the property of "idempotence" in that (aside from error or expiration issues) the side-effects of N > 0 identical requests is the same as for a single request. The methods GET, HEAD, PUT and DELETE share this property. Also, the methods OPTIONS and TRACE SHOULD NOT have side effects, and so are inherently idempotent. "


The key bit there is the side-effects of N > 0 identical requests is the same as for a single request.

You would be correct to expect that the status code would be different but this does not affect the core concept of idempotency - you can send the request more than once without additional changes to the state of the server.

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Side-effects !== server state –  wprl Nov 20 '13 at 14:01

Idempotent is about the effect of the request, not about the response code that you get.

http://www.w3.org/Protocols/rfc2616/rfc2616-sec9.html#sec9.1.2 says:

Methods can also have the property of "idempotence" in that (aside from error or expiration issues) the side-effects of N > 0 identical requests is the same as for a single request.

While you may get a different response code, the effect of sending N+1 DELETE requests to the same resource can be considered to be the same.

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From the HTTP RFC:

Methods can also have the property of "idempotence" in that (aside from error or expiration issues) the side-effects of N > 0 identical requests is the same as for a single request.

Note that's "side effects", not "response".

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I think the same thing, 404 - Account doesn't exist.

You could argue 400 - Bad Request. But in the sense of REST the object you requested to perform an action on doesn't exist. That translates to 404.

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To generate a 400 you would have to know that the object used to exist, which is very un-restful. –  annakata Nov 3 '10 at 15:10
    
@annakata, 400 is not even for resources that used to exist (perhaps you have 410/Gone in mind), it's for bad requests "The request could not be understood by the server due to malformed syntax." –  Bruno Nov 3 '10 at 15:13
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@Bruno - I'm aware of what it means, the OP cited it. –  annakata Nov 3 '10 at 15:53

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