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DELETE is supposed to be idempotent.

If I DELETE http://example.com/account/123 it's going to delete the account.

If I do it again would I expect a 404, since the account no longer exists? What if I attempt to DELETE an account that has never existed?

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5  
In addition to the answers, I'd suggest not to focus too much on the idempotent characteristic in general: it doesn't say anything about commutativity and concurrent requests. For example N+1 of the same "R1" PUT request should have the same effect, but you don't know if another client made a different PUT/DELETE "R2" request in between yours, so while nR1=R1 and mR2=R2, something where you get interleaved "R1" and "R2" requests won't necessarily "look" idempotent if you only take the perspective of a single client. – Bruno Nov 3 '10 at 15:22
up vote 107 down vote accepted

Idempotence refers to the state of the system after the request has completed


In all cases (apart from the error issues - see below), the account no longer exists.

From here

"Methods can also have the property of "idempotence" in that (aside from error or expiration issues) the side-effects of N > 0 identical requests is the same as for a single request. The methods GET, HEAD, PUT and DELETE share this property. Also, the methods OPTIONS and TRACE SHOULD NOT have side effects, and so are inherently idempotent. "


The key bit there is the side-effects of N > 0 identical requests is the same as for a single request.

You would be correct to expect that the status code would be different but this does not affect the core concept of idempotency - you can send the request more than once without additional changes to the state of the server.

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Side-effects !== server state – wprl Nov 20 '13 at 14:01
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@wprl There is a debate on what this "side-effect" really is. It may be "server state" or it may be response sent to client.leedavis81.github.io/is-a-http-delete-requests-idempotent – Alireza Jan 5 at 0:35
    
@Alireza Nice reference – Chris McCauley Jan 6 at 10:26

Idempotent is about the effect of the request, not about the response code that you get.

http://www.w3.org/Protocols/rfc2616/rfc2616-sec9.html#sec9.1.2 says:

Methods can also have the property of "idempotence" in that (aside from error or expiration issues) the side-effects of N > 0 identical requests is the same as for a single request.

While you may get a different response code, the effect of sending N+1 DELETE requests to the same resource can be considered to be the same.

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From the HTTP RFC:

Methods can also have the property of "idempotence" in that (aside from error or expiration issues) the side-effects of N > 0 identical requests is the same as for a single request.

Note that's "side effects", not "response".

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I think the same thing, 404 - Account doesn't exist.

You could argue 400 - Bad Request. But in the sense of REST the object you requested to perform an action on doesn't exist. That translates to 404.

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To generate a 400 you would have to know that the object used to exist, which is very un-restful. – annakata Nov 3 '10 at 15:10
    
@annakata, 400 is not even for resources that used to exist (perhaps you have 410/Gone in mind), it's for bad requests "The request could not be understood by the server due to malformed syntax." – Bruno Nov 3 '10 at 15:13
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@Bruno - I'm aware of what it means, the OP cited it. – annakata Nov 3 '10 at 15:53
    
I think 200 would be fine. You want the state of the server to be that the account is gone. Does it matter which request actually made it go away? It's still gone on the second request, server state hasn't changed. – Andy Oct 22 '15 at 1:42

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